What is the Eden Project?

The Eden Project — The world’s largest man-made complex of greenhouses in Cornwall, United Kingdom, inspired by Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome design.

The world’s largest man-made complex of greenhouses in Cornwall, United Kingdom.

Total surface  39.540 m2
Total steel  weight 700 tons
Total length  off all beams 36000 m
Steel weight per surface less than 24 kg/m2
Biggest hexagon area 80 m2 at a span of 11 m
Biggest dome diameter (dome B) 125 m
Column free area 15590 m2 WTB and 6540 m2 for HTB

Official website: Click Here 

Grimshaw Architects’ Site: Click Here

Video (bottom of webpage): Click Here

The Eden Project is a visitor attraction in Cornwall in the United Kingdom, including the world’s largest greenhouse.  Inside the artificial biomes are plants that are collected from all around the world. The project is located in a reclaimed Kaolinite pit, located 1.25 mi (2 kilometres) from the town of St Blazey and 5 kilometres (3 mi) from the larger town of St AustellCornwall.

The complex is dominated by two huge enclosures consisting of adjoining domes that house thousands of plant species, and each enclosure emulates a naturalbiome. The domes consist of hundreds of hexagonal and pentagonal, inflated, plastic cells supported by steel frames. The first dome emulates a tropicalenvironment, and the second a Mediterranean environment.

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Building the Seed Cathedral by Thomas Heatherwick

Seed Cathedral Thomas Heatherwick (Image Rights: Heatherwick Studio)

An oldie but goody I wanted to share with all.

The UK Pavilion [won the] 2010 RIBA Lubetkin Prize In September 2007, Heatherwick Studio led the winning team in the competition to design the UK Pavilion for the Shanghai 2010 Expo. The event [was] the largest Expo ever [to date] with two hundred countries taking part and over 70 million visitors expected. The theme of the Expo is “Better City, Better Life” and a key client objective is for the UK Pavilion to be one of the five most popular attractions. The studio’s design has three main aims: the first is to be a pavilion whose architecture is a direct manifestation of the content it exhibits; the second is to provide significant public open space in which visitors can relax; the third is to find a simple idea that is strong enough to stand out amidst the busy-ness of the hundreds of competing pavilions.

Click here to read the rest of the story.

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Architect Thomas Heatherwick shows five recent projects featuring ingenious bio-inspired designs. Some are remakes of the ordinary: a bus, a bridge, a power station … And one is an extraordinary pavilion, the Seed Cathedral, a celebration of growth and light. Watch Thomas Heatherwick’s talk on TED.com, where you can download it, rate it, comment on it. (Recorded at TED2011, March 2011, in Long Beach, CA. Duration: 16:52) 

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FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
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e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
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Library of Birmingham by Mecanoo Architects

Whenever I see innovative design I like to share it with my friends.  I hope you enjoy this project by Mecanoo Architects.

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Frank Cunha III 
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© Mecanoo Architects

© Mecanoo Architects

© Mecanoo Architects

© Mecanoo Architects

© Mecanoo Architects

The Library of Birmingham (located in the UK) will comprise of 10 levels, with nine above ground and a lower ground floor. It is being constructed using 21,000m³ of concrete in the frame, enough to fill more than eight Olympic sized swimming pools. The frame is reinforced by 3,000 tonnes of steel reinforcement, the equivalent weight of around 35,750 average UK men. 30,000m³ of material, enough to fill 60,000 bath tubs, had to be dug out of the basement. The building will feature a spacious entrance and foyer with mezzanine, the gateway to both the Library and the Birmingham Repertory Theatre, to which the new Library will be physically connected. There will also be a new flexible studio theatre, a lower ground level with indoor terraces, four further public levels and two outdoor elevated garden terraces. A ‘golden box’ of secure archive storage will occupy two levels of the building, within which the city’s internationally significant collection of archives, photography and rare books will be stored. A new state-of-the-art exhibition space will open up public access to the collections for the first time. The exterior of the building, from the first to the eighth floor will be wrapped with an intricate metal façade, echoing the tunnels, canals and viaducts which fuelled Birmingham’s industrial growth. Besides the Shakespeare Memorial Room and the new shared studio theatre with neighbouring Repertory Theatre, Birmingham’s 35,000m² new library will comprise a study centre, music library, community health centre, multimedia, archives, offices, exhibition halls and cafes.  For the rest of the article click here.  Text provided by Mecanoo Architecten.