Open Call: Topics for Future Articles

::::::: TOPICS ::::::: 
  • ARCHITECTURE: FROM THE INSIDE OUT
  • I LOVE MY ARCHITECT: I DON’T CARE IF HE/SHE IS INSANE    
  • ARCHITECTURE IN MOTION: HOW TRANSPORTATION IN AMERICA CHANGED THE CITY AND ALTERED OUR ENVIRONMENT
  • HOW DO DESIGNERS SEE THE WORLD AROUND THEM: ARTISTIC EXPRESSIONS OF AN ARCHITECT
  • LEARNING FROM TWITTER: HOW I DESIGN & CARVE SPACE UTILIZING SOCIAL MEDIA

If you woud like to contribute some text or a quote please contact me by email.

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Architecture in Motion

Riverside Museum by Zaha Hadid Architects

When I think of the “flow” of a space the first image to come to mind is the motion of the occupant and how he or she experiences the space.  Of course the building itself (and/or site) can have a flow as well (visual flow) both outside with the facade (think strong horizontal/vertical features, or curved forms of aluminum panels for example) or inside with the finishes (think flow of flooring material/texture from one space to another), but to me the perception of the space through movement has a greater impact on the occupant’s perception and experience of the space.  If the “space” is correctly designed by someone who understands the flows of a particular building type, it will certainly make for a joyous experience for the occupant.  When this not the case the occupant will feel uneasy and will not be able to have a pleasant experience.  A seasoned designer will be able to work simultaneously in plan and section to develop a design concept that will result in proper flow for the type of function being asked of the space that he/she is creating.  When the layout of the space, the material/textures used, the colors used, the use of light, and the flow of movement of  are properly executed the space just feels right.

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Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook 


SPACE & PROCESS

I was recently asked about my thoughts on the physics of Architecture and the spatial aspects of Architecture.  Below are some of my initial thoughts….
Space is not the “left-overs” of Architecture but rather the space itself is the Architecture. As a
life-long student of Architecture it is my humble opinion that it is the voids created by the solids
that make the experience of Architecture interesting and pleasurable. The only reason I design
and construct walls (and other solids) is to create the space (the negative). Space can be
experienced in various dimensions (as was portrayed in the film Powers of Ten, 1968 American
documentary short film written and directed by Ray Eames and her husband, Charles Eames.
The film, rereleased in 1977 depicts the relative scale of the Universe in factors of ten.)

“The only reason I design and construct walls….is to create the space….”

Robert Irwin, untitled, 1971, synthetic fabric, wood, fluorescent lights, floodlights, 96 x 564" approx., Collection Walker Art Center, Gift of the artist, 1971.

The process of producing Architecture from a monolithic form is to subtract from the solid what
is needed to create the negative space for the occupants to inhabit and enjoy. Then again, my
first memories of Architecture were great massive, heavy cathedrals and medieval castles, so
perhaps I am biased in some ways. The added dimension of a regular, monotonous grid and
violent irregular collisions and penetration of the pure form are yet another layer of interest in
post-modern Architecture (as can be seen in the work of Bernard Tschumi – Parc de la Villette).

Robert Irwin, Untitled, 1980, mixed media: fiberboard, paper, plastic and fabric, 22-3/4 x 22-1/8 x 10", Smithsonian American Art Museum, Transfer from the General Services Administration, 1980.49.6.

Finally, as a self-proclaimed photographic-artist/Architect, I use still images in my creation of the
artwork. The capturing of a single moment of time is much like an Architect’s plan. When I create
images from my photographs I am also exploring “the absence” or “the void” or what you call “the
reveal.” What fascinates me is that the process of creativity in and of itself can inform the final
form of what will become the Architectural space, which will be built by the hands of others and
eventually inhabited and experienced by others. This is very different from the assembly of a car,
a computer mouse, or other industrial item. Perhaps a more appropriate comparison is to that
of conductor who leads the orchestra in a certain direction but allows some interpretation by the
band.

Robert Irwin, untitled, 1971, synthetic fabric, wood, fluorescent lights, floodlights, 96 x 564" approx., Collection Walker Art Center, Gift of the artist, 1971.

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Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


CENTRAL PARK: The Lungs of the City as a Skyscraper

When I visited Central Park earlier this year with our guests from out-of-town I could not help but to image this incredible space as an edifice.  Architects have always been fascinated with towers and skyscrapers.

What if we turned Central Park from the horizontal to the vertical.  Of course the image below is very literal, but–

Can we apply some of the theories of Fredrick Olmsted to a skyscraper in the city?  Could this be the beginning of the resurgence of the city?

Click here for more Architectural theory and concepts.

Sincerely,
@FrankCunhaIII 


Attention Deficit Disorder – Designing Every 2 to 3 Minutes

A.D.D. may be over diagnosed these days (especially in schools), but during Architecture School one of my professors wanted my friend to see how long I could stay at my drafting table (remember those? I’m dating myself here, although my class may have been one of the last to use them).  After a few minutes I would get restless, now with social media I can work on several things at once which satisfies the A.D.D.

What we discovered (after several all-nighters) was a direct link between where I lived and the airplane “noise” I would hear subconsciously (after living under the flight zone my entire life my consciousness had completely tuned it out).  I used the timing of the flights (every 2 to 3 minutes) to help inform my Architectural design theories.  For example;

Recording Apparatus

New York City Recording Apparatus

Here is a map of where I grew up:

Where I grew up and lived for close to 30-years

A Closer Look

Perhaps this helps shed some light on how I operate!

Sincerely,
@FrankCunhaIII 


Bye House (Wall House) by John Hejduk

The Bye House (Wall House) was designed by John Hedjuk in the 1970s, built posthumously (Groningen, The Netherlands, 2001).

John Hejduk (July 19, 1929 – July 3, 2000), was an Architect, Artist and Educator who spent much of his life in New York City. Hejduk is noted for his use of attractive and often difficult-to-construct objects and shapes; also for a profound interest in the fundamental issues of shape, organization, representation, and reciprocity.

Hejduk studied at the Cooper Union School of Art and Architecture, the University of Cincinnati, and the Harvard Graduate School of Design, from which he graduated with a Masters in Architecture in 1953. He worked in several offices in New York including that of I. M. Pei and Partners and the office of A.M. Kinney and Associates. He established his own practice in New York in 1965.

One of my favorite days is June 9, 2001, when I got married to the love of my life and received the book “Mask of Medusa” written by John Hedjuk from my great friend.  It is a rare book and one of my prize possessions which I treasure (I love my wife too).


City of Culture by Eisenman Architects

I love Architectural design theory and I love skate boarding; Peter Eisenman combined them both when he designed the 173-acre site on Mount Gaiás.  The project neighbors Santiago de Compostela where the cathedral houses the remains of the apostle St. James, brought to Spain from Jerusalem after his death in AD 44. Since the eighth century, pilgrims have trekked to the medieval town to pay homage to his shrine.

Photo © Duccio Malagamba

Eisenman Architects’ winning scheme, folded into the earth and seductively represented by a molded wood model, beat out varied proposals by ten finalists: Steven Holl Architects, OMA/Rem Koolhaas, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, Gigon Guyer Architects, Dominique Perrault Architecture, Studio Daniel Libeskind, Juan Navarro Baldeweg, César Portela, Ricardo Bofill/Taller de Arquitectura, and José Manuel Gallego Jorreto.

Click here for more info.