Frans Johansson: “Act & Collaborate to Drive Change”

Frans Johansson is an innovation expert and author of The Medici Effect. As CEO of The Medici Group, he leads a team which helps clients improve their innovation efforts through an approach they call Intersectional Thinking.

In the following video Frans Johansson illustrates how relentless trial-and-error – coming up with an idea, executing it on a small scale, and then refining it – is THE distinguishing characteristic of the greatest artists, scientists, and entrepreneurs. Why? Because humans are not very good at predicting which ideas are going to be a success. Thus, nearly every major breakthrough innovation has been preceded by a string of failed or misguided executions. So, as Frans says quoting Churchill, “If you’re going through hell, keep going.”

The idea for the book “The Medici Effect” is based on intersection.  The best way to come up with groundbreaking ideas is to combine very different ideas – like termites and architecture; ice and beds; and bikinis and burqas.  Diversity drives innovation.

What Drives Innovation?

We innovate best when we connect with others and share new ideas/perspectives. The key is to connect across our differences.

Technology increasingly drives new operational and business models.

He created a magazine “Catalyst” to bring stuff together, started a software company that “went really well until it didn’t.”.

He investigates how intersections lead to innovations.

We have the best chance to innovate when we connect across our differences.

Innovation is important because the world is changing very quickly.

Example:  Spanish fashion company Zara can go from design to selling a dress across the world in 7 days.

A more sobering example; only 68% of recent law school graduates are working in a job that requires a J.D.

Yet our ability to innovate constricts as our firms get larger.  Innovation tends to come from newcomers, upstarts.

One reason is that we tend to use logic as the only guidance for reaching success.  For instance, Audi and Volvo might both to decide to address their minor deficiencies, then end up with cars that look quite similar.

Why is it Necessary to Innovate Quickly?

If you want to keep your competitive advantage, you have to keep innovating because there has been a stunning drop in the amount of time it takes for your competitors to catch up with you.

Why is it so Hard to Innovate?

Because change is difficult and intimidating, we tend to settle for tweaking things around the edges rather than making a comprehensive change. The impact of this is adding more widgets to a Yahoo search engine until the clutter is overcome by the spare and elegant design of a Google search engine.

New Ideas Are Combinations of Other

Johansson proposes that all new ideas are combinations of existing ideas.  But not all combinations of ideas are created equal.

Working Understanding

Most truly stunning innovations result from combination two different ideas. The greater the number of ideas that you generate and implement, the greater your chance of a breakthrough. You need to try many things because humans are very bad at predicting what will work. The key is to keep trying until you perfect your execution. When your first idea doesn’t work, you have to try again. Diverse teams can unleash an explosion of new ideas. You end up with an exponential increase in new ideas that leads to more opportunities for innovation.

Create the Environment Necessary to Foster Innovation

We can help organize our firms to foster innovation. This ranges from seating people within your department in such a way that they can’t help be exposed to new ideas and new ways of working. Individually, you also can ensure that you personally make connections with people within the firm who are in different disciplines or from different backgrounds or have different interests.

Don’t Give Up! Innovators Fail More Often

We are horrible at predicting what will work. We don’t often hear the tales of the bad ideas only the heroic ending of how someone became successful with their one brilliant idea and how they were able to envision a new future and make that future a reality.

What is the Most Effective Way to Execute?

Directional ideas often are executed in step-by-step fashion.  More innovative ideas can take longer and get developed less directly.

We use up energy, money, and reputation in getting to a goal. So start by taking the first step; an easy manageable step.

Start with a good idea. And then act on it. Johansson calls this the “smallest executable step.” It’s not about going directly to the desired Big Hairy Audacious Goal. Rather, execute the first step; adjust based on results; execute again. The key is to iterate your way to success.

Some examples provided by Johansson:

ANTS & TRUCK DRIVERS

The example of ants and truck drivers, which I talk about in one of the chapters. So there is this telecommunications engineer that has been is trying to figure out how to efficiently route telecom messages through a haphazard routing system. And one day the communications engineer met an ecologist, who studies social insects, like wasps and ants. And they started talking, and the ecologist described how ants search for food. As it turned out, the ant’s search strategy turned out to be very applicable to the routing of telecom message packets. Once the engineer realized this, he decided to explore this particular intersection between ant ecology and computer search algorithms, so he spent three years looking at the connection between the way social insects behave and the way you can use computers to optimize particular types of search algorithms. And that has now lead to an entirely new field called swarm intelligence, which essentially came out of the intersection of the study of social insects and computer search algorithms. This methodology has been used in everything from helping truck drivers find their way around the Swiss Alps to helping unmanned aerial vehicles search for terrorists in Afghanistan.

TERMITES & ARCHITECTURE

A man was commissioned to build the largest office building complex in Harare, Zimbabwe without air conditioning.

He did it by combining the ideas of architecture and termite houses.

Termite houses open and close vents to regulate heat and cold. He combined ideas from these two fields to break new ground and build an energy efficient office complex that was able to maintain a comfortable temperature.

512px-Natural_ventilation_high-rise_buildings.svg.png

BURKINI

At the intersections of different ideas and cultures, the Medici effect happens.

For example, if you wanted to come up with a new, creative idea for swimwear, usually you would combine swimwear with the beach. But what if you combined swimwear with the idea of a burqa?

A lady moved to Australia where the normal female swimwear was bikinis. Many traditional Moslem women go swimming in their burqas. She combined the ideas of bikinis and burqas – and made a burqa out of bikini material.

After the fact, an innovative idea seems somewhat obvious.

People that change the world try far more ideas than others because we are horrible at predicting what ideas will work. Einstein published over 240 papers, many of which not a single person referenced. Google has launched hundreds of products. Picasso painted lots of paintings to figure out what paintings did work.

To be successful, you have to take this notion into account – that you won’t always be successful.

WIKIPEDIA

Take Wikipedia, for example. We may have thought – is that even possible? Creating Wikipedia takes understanding the altruistic nature of people and understanding the Internet. Before he launched

Wikipedia, Jimmy Wales launched Newspedia and asked experts to contribute to it. After six months, there were only twenty posts. Jimmy’s new idea was to allow anyone to make posts. Wikipedia has been one of the most successful Internet projects. Jimmy Wales kept trying.

How does this play out? Maybe you have an idea. Often from an idea you create a large goal and then you use 100% of your resources (your money and your reputation) to reach it. After all that work and effort, you now realize how you should have done it. You realize what would have been a better goal or a better way to do it.

ICE & BEDS

For example, a guy in northern Sweden saw a future with the cold and snow. He combined the idea of ice with a hotel. He created a hotel made out of ice. Everything is made out of ice – the beds, walls, tables, etc. It is one of Sweden’s largest tourist attractions. He realized he could do something no one else could do. But it didn’t start with The Ice Hotel.

First, he had an idea to “sell” the winter. His first idea was to fly in some ice sculptures from Japan. He had an ice exhibition. It wasn’t successful because the ice melted.

Next, he tried a snow gallery and had paintings hung in an ice building.

Then he created an event hall with everything made out of ice, including a movie screen. A few backpackers who saw it said they would like to sleep on a bed made of ice. He made a bed of ice and they loved it.

Then he created The Ice Hotel. Within weeks Newsweek named it one of the ten coolest hotels in the world.

MGMT 561 Assignment #3 Reflection CUNHA 01.pngSource: Frans Johansson: The Secret Truth About Executing Great Ideas

CONCLUSION

You have to start with an idea – a step.

Take your first step to change the world. The best way to come up with this idea is at the intersection of different cultures and ideas.  Figure out something you can do and make it happen. The world is connected – there is somebody making those connections and it should be YOU!

MGMT 561 Assignment #3 Reflection CUNHA 02.pngSource: Frans Johansson: The Secret Truth About Executing Great Ideas

MGMT 561 Assignment #3 Reflection CUNHA 03.pngSource: The Medici Effect

MGMT 561 Assignment #3 Reflection CUNHA 04.pngSource: The Medici Effect

References & Sources:

Frans Johansson Keynote #ILTA12 David Hobbie

Frans Johansson: The Secret Truth About Executing Great Ideas

Frans Johansson Keynote #ILTA12 VMaryAbraham

How do people get more creative?

An Interview with Frans Johansson: The Medici Effect

Frans Johansson: The Secret Truth About Executing Great Ideas 

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

Gift Ideas from ILMA

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Our Exclusive ILMA Interview with Matthew B. Jarmel, AIA, MBA of @JarmelKizel

Mr. Jarmel is an Architect, Real Estate Developer, Renewable Energy Enthusiast, Entrepreneur and Owner of Jarmel Kizel Architects and Engineers Inc.

He received a Bachelors of Architecture from NJIT in 1990 and an MBA from Rutgers University in 1994. He can be found online at the following social media sites: LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.

About the Firm

Since the firm’s founding in 1975, Jarmel Kizel has worked its way from the inside out; originally concentrating on the interior design of corporate offices and since has grown into a full-service Architectural, Engineering, and Interior Design firm that provides a single point of accountability for all aspects of design services. The firm’s size and abilities enable it to handle a broad spectrum of projects while allowing the principals to put their seal on every one. With in-house Civil, Structural, Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing and Fire Protection Engineering, clients can look to Jarmel Kizel to have all aspects of their projects designed and managed by one firm.

Today the firm provides a unique service platform that provides a single point of accountability for architectural and engineering services formatted to assist clients with managing their project’s design needs from site design and land entitlements to building design through construction oversight.

ILMA INTERVIEW

When and why did you decide to become an Architect?     

I knew when I was in Junior High School that I wanted to become an architect.  I grew up in the industry in that my father is a commercial interior designer, he actually founded our firm in 1975, and I was exposed to design and construction at a very early age.  My dad totally remodeled our home and he had my brother Richard, who is a civil engineer and partner in our firm, and myself helping and working with tools. 

What were some of the challenges of achieving your dream?  

The architectural and engineering industry can be very rewarding.  There is tremendous emotional fulfillment to see your ideas first take shape on paper and then through construction.  I take great pride driving by a building our firm has designed and saying we did that.  Despite the rewards the business of architecture can be very difficult.  Our industry is first hit by a recession, hardest hit and usually the last to recover.   One of the greatest challenges of working in the profession is learning how to batten down the hatches and weather the economic storms when they come. 

Any memorable clients or project highlights?  

I have many projects I am proud of many clients that I respect and that have become good friends and even partners over the years.  Some of the more notable projects I have worked on include designing the Bear Stearns Campus in Whippany, NJ.  This project was developed over years and ultimately included approximately 700,000 sf of office and data center space in five buildings, two of which we designed and the rest we designed major renovations to.  Unfortunately Bear Stearns does not exist anymore but the campus is still there.  We also were fortunate to design the first major redevelopment project in Plainfield, NJ where we designed four buildings for the Union County Improvement Authority that included a 100,000 sf office building, two retail buildings totaling 40,000 sf and a parking structure.   This project acted as a catalyst for new development in the city.   Over the last several years the firm has been very active in NYC designing many mixed use large scale projects, we have a 17 story building under construction in Queens right now.   One of my most memorable clients is The Learning Experience.   The Learning Experience is a national and soon to be international brand of child development centers.  We designed their first center 16 years ago and have since completed over 200 projects throughout the country for them.  Because of the volume of projects we have completed for them, about 70 in NJ alone, I gained tremendous experience in land entitlements and have become an expert in land entitlement strategy.

How does your family support what you do?    

The creative process can be very time consuming, running a business and being creative magnifies the time required to be an architect.  Some days I leave the house at 7 and if I have a hearing don’t get home until midnight.   Other times I am hopping on an airplane and away overnight.   My family is supportive in that they understand the taxing requirements of the job.   With that said everything I do is for my family.  So I make sure my wife and children get the attention they need from me and we plan as much quality time as possible.

How do Architects measure success?     

Some might say you measure the success of an architect by the quality and aesthetic of the buildings he or she designs, or by how much wealth and fame they have obtained.  To me a successful architect you have to be a strong leader, a strong communicator and be able to balance the aesthetic and technical issues of a building’s design all while understanding the functional and economical goals of your client.  The architect that can achieve this can become successful.  Ultimately success is measured by obtaining the respect of your peers, clients and even contractors in the industry.  

What matters most to you in design?      

Achieving my clients goals of function and budget while creating a building that is safe and attractive.   

What do you hope to achieve over the next 2 years? 5 years?  

Our firm has developed strong skills in real estate development which include land entitlements and real estate economics.   Many times we set the strategy for how to present a project to planning and zoning boards, explain the process to our clients and even their attorneys, advise on PILOT and other incentives, building valuation and assist in making introduction to equity investors and lenders.   These skills make us stand out from our competitors but not necessarily obtain higher fees.  Our goal for the next 2 to 5 years is to expand our Real Estate Advisory services to create additional revenue as a “Fee Developer” and on our own development account.

Who is your favorite Architect? Why?     

I respect the design styles of many current and historic architects.  I am a big fan of the Chicago School and of those architects Louis Sullivan is probably my favorite.  I like this style for the buildings of the time were the first commercial buildings and first to break away from using ancient detailing by employing and emphasizing technology in design.

Do you have a coach or mentor?

I do not have a specific coach or mentor but I like to bounce ideas off of my team, clients and friends.  

What is your favorite historic and modern (contemporary) project? Why?  

My favorite historic building is the Roman Pantheon.  It was built around 113 AD and has the largest unreinforced concrete dome ever made which has a giant hole in the center that allows the sun and the moon to shine in along with the rain.  It still stands 2000 years later.  The Romans were great builders, they invented concrete, experimented with reinforcing concrete with brass chains and even developed zoning rules and regulations.   As far as contemporary buildings there are so many that I love.   I lean towards high rise sky scrapers

Where do you see the profession going over the next few decades?

Although new technologies are implemented in the profession and we go through these stages where we preach design build vs a separation between design and construction professionals the industry has not changed much in my career.  I find it interesting that Ayn Rand’s “The Fountainhead” which was written in the 40’s and takes place in the 20’s and uses the architectural industry as a back story to promoting her political views speaks to many of the same type of players and issues in the industry today.  There are developers, contractors, politicians and architects.  There are residential, public and commercial buildings and she even tackles issues such as affordable housing.  All the same issues we deal with today.   I do not see major changes in the business of the profession.  Although I do see major technical influences which will affect the way we design and build buildings.  There is a robot that lays brick now.  I think as the world gets smaller through technology building codes and licensing laws will become more standardized.

What type of technology do you see in the design and construction industries?

The use of BIM is becoming the most prevalent tool used in the design of buildings.  It allows architects and engineers to work in 3 dimensions, quickly and efficiently to improve coordination and actually see the building take shape on the screen.  Despite my comment about the brick laying robot above most construction is still done with heavy machinery and by hand.  However, technology has taken over the management of projects from creating schedules, to tracking financing and creating a database of information.  

Who / what has been your greatest influence in design?      

This answer may seem odd to most architects but my great influence in design arrives from an understanding of real estate economics tied to a building’s function and economics.   When a student at NJIT I took an elective in real estate development.  It was taught by a gentleman who ran the development arm of a now defunct savings and loan so we will allow him to remain nameless.  However, he was very influential in that he said he hated architects and found them to be a necessary evil in the process because the law forced them on him to use.  Obviously, this got most of the students in the class upset but I wanted to know why he felt that way.  He thought that architects only cared about what the building looked like and had no understanding or really care for what it might cost to build, what’s its function was to be or how it generated revenue for its owners.  He introduced me to the business side of why clients build in the first place.  This motivated me to go on and obtain an MBA with a concentration in real estate development and urban land use after architectural school.  I feel that the business education in conjunction with my architectural education make me a stronger architect and have been the most influential on my design.

Which building or project type would you like to work on that you haven’t been part of yet?     

I have been fortunate to work on almost any type of commercial project.  I would like to be exposed to more hospitality projects.

How do you hope to inspire / mentor the next generation of Architects?   

I hope to mentor the next generation of architects in a way that they can understand the business goals of the client and why they are building so that they can better respond to the client’s needs I also want to mentor them to be strong leaders and great communicators.

What advice would you give aspiring architects (K-12)? College students? Graduates?

I would advise them to not only pursue their dream of designing buildings but to learn about the profession as a whole, to learn about the process of becoming an architect and career choices in the industry.  When I was in school no one told me how to become a licensed architect I had to figure it out on my own.

What does Architecture mean to you?     

It is my profession, it is my life!

What is your design process?     

First understand the client’s program goals and budget, then study the site and zoning constraints, roll up my sleeves and dive in.

If you could not be an Architect, what would you be?     

A civil engineer and or real estate developer.

What is your dream project?     

A really tall building in a major city that becomes a landmark for years to come.  If I can be a partner in its ownership even better.

What advice do you have for a future Executive leader?     

Respect and care about the people you are leading, be kind but stern.

What are three key challenges you face as a leader in business today and one trend you see in your industry?     

All challenges revolve around people.  First finding qualified people, there is a tremendous shortage of qualified architects and engineers, second finding people that can see the big picture first before the crawl into the details and finally finding people that can communicate effectively.   As far as trends see my answer to where I see the industry going above

What one thing must an executive leader be able to do to be successful in the next 3 years?      

I am optimistic that we are at the beginning of a sustainable economic growth period.  This will provide many of us with significant projects to choose from and an even more challenging labor shortage.  An executive leader will need to be able to recruit talent and keep them motivated to stay.

What are some executive insights you have gained since you have been sitting in the executive leadership seat – or what is one surprise you have encountered as the world of business continues to morph as we speak?     

I do not know if I am any smarter today at 50 then I was when I got out of school in my early 20’s what I have gained is life experience.  The most important lesson is that people will surprise you. Some will impress you, some will disappoint you, some will be loyal and others not.  I have seen some crazy things happen some good and some bad.   Just when I think I have seen everything someone surprises me. 

Final Thoughts on How to Be Successful?      

Learn your trade, be good at and then learn to be a good communication and leader and business person.

For more exclusive ILMA interviews click here.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

Gift Ideas from ILMA


Furniture & Product Design by Famous Architects

Picture1Ludwig Mies van der Rohe – “Barcelona Chair”

Le Corbusier CollectionLe Corbusier – “The LC4” (a chaise lounge)

Edge of the SeatRem Koolhaas – “Edge of the Seat”

Ball ChairEero Aarnio – “Ball Chair”

Ettore SottsassEttore Sottsass – Art Deco Post-Modernism

Rocking ChaiseFrank Gehry – “Rocking Chaise”

“Mesa” Glass TableZaha Hadid – “Mesa” Glass Table

Paradigm ShiftRem Koolhaas – “Paradigm Shift”

Kettle Tea RexMichael Graves – “Kettle Tea Rex” tea kettle

Paragon Lamp for ArtemideDaniel Libeskind – “Paragon Lamp” for Artemide


Wall Street Journal Headlines – October 6, 2017 by @FrankCunhaIII

  1. Russian Hackers Steal NSA Spy Secrets
  2. US Shale Companies Ease Up on Drilling
  3. End year at 9.69 million barrels a day, down from 9.82
  4. Amazon.com
    • Hiring 50,000 office workers, mostly software developers
  5. Illegal Entry to US Gets Rarer, Riskier
    • President’s harder line, longer-term trends make SW border tougher to sneak across
  6. Price Pressures for Renters Begins to Ease Down
    • Those that spend more than 30% of incomes on rent
    • Fell from 48.9% to 47.7% between 2012 and 2015
  7. Iraq Drives ISIS From Stronghold
  8. Turkey Arrests US Consulate Worker
  9. Saudis, Russia Get Closer
  10. NATO to Increase Funding for Counterterror Programs
  11. Catalan Parliament Session Blocked
  12. Prospects for a Gun – Measure Deal Grow
  13. Legislation restricting rifle accessory used in L.V. gunman draws GOP support
  14. Columbia Sets $100M to Diversify Faculty
  15. Ishiguro’s Quiet Power Claims the Nobel Prize
  16. Opinion – Why America Needs Tax Reform
  17. Trump needs to stress the growth payoff and rebut falsehoods from critics at the Tax Policy Center.
  18. Finge Clips Rank High on YouTube
    • Google looking to promote more reliable content
  19. Uber Steers Steadier Course
  20. Forget bitcoin, IMFcoin could be the digital future of SDRs
    • IMF – International Monetary Fund
    • SDR – Special Drawing Rights (ISO 4217currency code XDR, also abbreviated SDR) are supplementary foreign-exchange reserve assets defined and maintained by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The XDR is the unit of account for the IMF, and is not a currency per se.
  21. Ship Building Alliance to Target Asia
  22. SpaceX Aims to Launch at Fast Pace
    • Planning 30 launches next year (50% of total)
    • There are about 60 launches each year
  23. Netflix Raises Prices as Content Tab Balloons
  24. Honeywell Pursues Purchase of Evoqua
    • Honeywell International Inc. is an American multinational conglomerate company that produces a variety of commercial and consumer products, engineering services and aerospace systems for a wide variety of customers, from private consumers to major corporations and governments. The company operates four business units, known as Strategic Business Units – Honeywell Aerospace, Home and Building Technologies (HBT), Safety and Productivity Solutions (SPS), and Honeywell Performance Materials and Technologies.
    • Evoqua is the global leader in helping municipalities and industrial customers protect and improve the world’s most fundamental natural resource: water. We have a more than 100-year heritage of innovation and industry firsts, market-leading expertise, and unmatched customer service. Our cost-effective and reliable treatment systems and services ensure uninterrupted quantity and quality of water, enable regulatory and environmental compliance, increase efficiency through water reuse, and prepare customers for next-generation demands.
  25. Nostalgic Beef Slogan Makes Cut
    • “It’s What’s For Dinner” Slogan
    • Beef consumption in the US declined 15% in the decade through 2015
  26. Facebook Cut Russia from Report on Election
    • FB under fire for playing down role of influence campaigns
  27. Equifax timeline Criticized
  28. New Federal Rule Clamps Down on Payday Loans
  29. OPEC Pushes Russia to Stick to Plan
    • The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries is a group consisting of 12 of the world’s major oil-exporting nations.
    • OPEC was founded in 1960 to coordinate the petroleum policies of its members, and to provide member states with technical and economic aid.
  30. Treasury Yields Climb to 3-Month High
  31. Financial, Tech Stocks Fuel Rally
  32. Data Center Firm “Switch” Prices IPO Above Range, Raises $531 Million
    • Switch Inc.
    • Pricing is latest sign of strengthening in tech initial public offering space.
    • The data-center company that powers businesses of Amazon.com Inc., eBay Inc. and other tech companies is the latest to cash in on a renewed interest among investors in technology IPOs.
    • After pricing above the $14-to-$16 range it initially outlined to investors, Las Vegas-based Switch Inc.’s initial public offering raised roughly $531 million Thursday, excluding shares allotted to underwriters.
    • Shares sold at $17 apiece, valuing the company at roughly $4.2 billion.
    • NASDAQ
    • IPO Price
  33. Gold Loses Luster as Global Angst Eases
  34. Bad Timing for Monte Dei Paschi
    • Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena
    • Known as BMPS or just MPS is the oldest surviving bank in the world and the third largest Italian commercial and retail bank by total assets.
    • BMPS and Banco BPM, Banco BPM overtook BMPS as the third largest bank in terms of total assets on 31 December 2016. Since the end of 2016, BMPS has been struggling to avoid a collapse.
    • Founded in 1472 (545 years ago) by the magistrates of the city state of Siena, Italy, as a “mount of piety”, it has been operating ever since. In 1995 the bank, then known as Monte dei Paschi di Siena, was transformed from a statutory corporation to a limited company called Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena (Banca MPS).
    • The Fondazione Monte dei Paschi di Siena was created to continue the charitable functions of the bank and to be, until the bailout in 2013, its largest single shareholder.
    • Today Banca MPS has approximately 2,000 branches, 26,000 employees and 5.1 million customers in Italy, as well as branches and businesses abroad. A subsidiary, MPS Capital Services, handles corporate and investment banking.
  35. This Market Bubble Isn’t Everything It Appears to Be

Love It or Hate It The Spaceship Has Landed – How Apple Built a Campus Shaped Like a Mac-Pro

Apple Park

Apple Park is Apple’s second campus in Cupertino, California. It is often referred to as the “spaceship” campus due to its unique ring-shaped design. Encompassing 2.8 million square feet and spanning 176 acres, construction on the campus started in 2013 with a completion date set for Summer 2017. Employees will begin moving to the campus in April of 2017.
The first event to be held at Apple Park is scheduled for September 12, 2017, at the Steve Jobs Theater.

The entire front of the main building features iconic curved glass windows, letting employees look out at the rest of the campus, which will be covered in greenery and an orchard. Along with the primary building that will house 13,000 employees, there’s an underground auditorium for hosting events, a fitness center, a cafe, and a visitor’s center. Underground parking is available, and there are also two research and development facilities located nearby.

Apple Park was designed by late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs in partnership with Norman Foster.

Apple’s new ‘campus’ to include hundreds of fruit trees for 14,200 employees in Cupertino

Apple Campus 2 Construction Update

At its October 15, 2013 adjourned regular meeting, the Cupertino City Council approved the Apple Park project.

Most of the 175 acre area is located on the former Hewlett Packard (HP) campus and is bounded by I-280 to the south, Wolfe Road to the west, Homestead Road to the north and North Tantau Avenue to the east. The replacement and rebuild proposal includes:

  • Demolition of approximately 2.65 million square feet of existing office, research and development buildings;
  • Construction of:
  • An office, research and development building comprising approximately 2.8 million square feet;
  • A 1,000 seat corporate auditorium;
  • A corporate fitness center;
  • A central plant;
  • Research facilities comprising up to 600,000 square feet located east and west of Tantau Avenue between Pruneridge Ave and I-280;
  • Associated parking

The City’s Review consisted of:

 

Read about my thesis on “technology-driven” space while at School of Architecture at NJIT: Click Here

Sincerely,
Frank

 


Hanging with the Cool Kids of @MSUCSAM

On August 21st, 2017, The College of Science and Mathematics at Montclair State University hosted an impromptu gathering for 

Click on The College of Science and Mathematics to learn more about Science at MSU, which has been designated by the state as a public research university.

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Thanks!
Frank  Cunha IIITwitter | Facebook | LinkedIn | Blog


Best Toys for Architects….Countdown

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Hardware:

5. The “lazzzer” – documenting existing condition dimensions has never been easier, my brand of choice: Hilti

4. The laptop – today’s technology allows us to “Architect” on the go, great models available for both pc and mac platforms but be sure to max out RAM, video, and get a solid state harddrive; if you are going with a mac like me, check out this sound advise

3. Twin 30″ displays – for cad work and photoshop at the office, today there are great choices under $1,000 for each display

2. Mobile phone – responding to clients and contractors on the go, from Blackberrys to iPhones to Droids, Architects cannot be productive without one

1. The Tablet – great for referencing drawings in the field, meeting minutes, and notes, I love my iPad, it’s my favorite device, most effective for the price and syncs with all my other hardware, can’t image living without it, next time I’m upgrading from Wifi to a network plan so I can be limitless

Software:

5. Microsoft Project – manage projects utilizing this software to track milestones, durations, critical path activities, delays and recovery, from predesign to post-occupancy

4. Microsoft Suite – boring, yes, but still most effective way to prepare proposals, spreadsheets, and presentations

3. Adobe Photoshop – makes our cool projects look even cooler

2. Adobe Acrobat Pro – this is an unbelievable investment to help organize data for printing, distribution, and easy access, I can’t image not being able to use this software

1. Autodesk Revit – allows us to design and document our designs in 3-D, visualizing and presenting our ideas in a way unimaginable 20-30 years ago. Clients love the 3-D renderings and Architects love the ability to coordinate between plan, elevation, and section. It’s definitely worthy of the investment dollars to gain productivity and the ability to design in a “real” three dimension environment – You get to build the building “virtually” before building the building.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
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