The 10,000 Year Clock #ilmaBlog

I want to build a clock that ticks once a year. The century hand advances once every 100 years, and the cuckoo comes out on the millennium. I want the cuckoo to come out every millennium for the next 10,000 years.

(Danny Hillis, a polymath inventor, computer engineer, and designer, inventor and prime genius of the Clock. He and Stewart Brand, a cultural pioneer and trained biologist)

The full scale 10,000 Year Clock is now under construction. While there is no completion date scheduled, we do plan to open it to the public once it is ready. The essay below by Long Now board member Kevin Kelly discusses what we hope the Clock will be once complete. This is one of several projects by Long Now to foster long-term thinking in the context of the next 10,000 years. Click here to read the rest of the story.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


CELS Earns Honorable Mention Among @USGBCNJ Gala Award Winners – 2019

NEWS – The U.S. Green Building Council New Jersey Chapter (USGBC NJ) celebrated nine New Jersey-based projects at its Annual Awards Gala. The Gala took place on Wednesday, May 22, 2019 at the LEED registered Hyatt Regency, New Brunswick, NJ.

Each year, USGBC NJ recognizes and presents these distinguished awards to companies and individuals that have demonstrated outstanding achievement and best practices in green building and sustainability.

“The Annual Awards Gala is a stellar event,” said USGBC NJ Board Chair Daniel Topping, Principal with NK Architects. “It is our opportunity to celebrate innovative green New Jersey projects, while networking and financially supporting the mission of USGBC NJ. This year’s winners are exciting and inspiring. They range from corporate campuses, higher education facilities, sustainably built residential projects, a comprehensive green cleaning initiative and an urban resiliency park.”

This year, USGBC NJ’s Gala celebrated the following Award Winners (click for list of winners).

Honorable Mention

Included as an honorable mention was the Center for Environmental and Life Sciences (CELS) facility, a 107,500 square foot, LEED® Gold–certified science facility devoted to environmental and pharmaceutical life sciences research.  CELS enables Montclair State University’s College of Science and Mathematics (CSAM) to build on its collaborative culture combining strengths across disciplines and building research programs of exceptional power. In the process, Montclair State University demonstrates that it can make a large impact on the advancement of science and technology, especially in the sustainable use of natural resources and improved human health. The building comprises of a comprehensive array of laboratories, seminar rooms, classrooms, and other facilities that enable collaborative transdisciplinary research in the pharmaceutical life sciences and environmental sciences. It joins three existing science buildings around a “learning and discovery landscape” to give science research a high-visibility position on the campus.

The Project Team

  • Montclair State University Project Manager: Frank Cunha III, AIA
  • Architect of Record: The S/L/A/M Collaborative, Inc.
  • Engineer of Record: Vanderweil Engineers
  • Contractor: Terminal Construction Corporation
  • LEED Consultant: Green Building Center – New Jersey
  • Commissioning Agent: NORESCO

Some of the LEED-specific features include:

  • Both bus and rail transportation options within a half-mile walking distance.
  • The building is situated on an area that was previously developed.
  • The site is near to basic services such as places of worship, a convenience store, day care center, library, park, police department, school, restaurants, theaters, community center, fitness center, and museums.
  • A green roof with sedum mats is located above the second floor. This absorbs stormwater, restores habitat, adds insulation to the building roof, and provides a scenic study site and retreat for building occupants.
  • Exterior landscaping includes water efficient plantings and two rain gardens in front of the building.
  • A 35 percent reduction of water use in flush & flow fixtures.
  • Separate collection of refuse and recyclables with color-coded storage containers to avoid contamination of the waste stream.
  • Smoking is prohibited in the building and within 25 feet of entries, outdoor intakes and operable windows.
  • The building is mechanically ventilated with CO2 sensors programmed to generate an alarm when the conditions vary by 10 percent or more from the design value.
  • The design outdoor air intake flow for all zones is 30 percent greater than the minimum outdoor air ventilation rate required by ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, Ventilation Rate Procedure.
  • Lighting controls include scene controllers and occupancy sensors for classrooms, conference rooms and open plan workstations, with task lighting provided.

Further reading about the facility:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


[Repost] Futurist Thomas Frey Makes Predictions About Our Children’s Future #ilmaBlog #Children #Futurism #Technology #Innovation #STEM #Education #2040

Understanding the future through the eyes of a child: 29 insane predictions and why it matters?

by  | Mar 6, 2019 | Predictions

Last week my grandson Raymund turned 5 years old, and it caused me to think about the kind of world he’ll be entering into.

The workforce of tomorrow will need to be resilient, flexible, resourceful, creative problem solvers, ethical, epithetical, situationally aware, perseverant, purpose-driven, relentless, and totally distraction-proof. Yes, somehow they need to be distraction-proof.

As I started writing down a list of future attributes, the last one – distraction-proof – has become a recurring theme in most of my thinking. Most of today’s children are the complete opposite of distraction-proof. In fact, I would go so far as to say they have a squirrel phobia. If they haven’t gotten distracted in the last 10 seconds they’ll start wondering if something is wrong.

Training someone to have extreme focus, with the ability to block out all bright shiny objects, is not only a tall order; it’s also a topic that virtually no one is teaching.

In my way of thinking, it’s ok to push future generations towards things we ourselves struggle with, because the demands of the future will be far more intense for them!

The future will require they be better at virtually everything – smarter, quick to adapt, high energy, work long hours, durable, and much more resilient when things go wrong. Yet we’ve been doing just the opposite, instilling a sense of frailty, trying to protect them from everything that can possibly go wrong. Keep in mind, a great captain is never made from calm seas.

How will today’s 5-year olds grow into their roles in the future?

In 2040 the life of today’s five-year olds will look far different than they do today.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THE STORY

We would love to hear from you about what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Hanging with the Cool Kids of @MSUCSAM

On August 21st, 2017, The College of Science and Mathematics at Montclair State University hosted an impromptu gathering for 

Click on The College of Science and Mathematics to learn more about Science at MSU, which has been designated by the state as a public research university.

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Thanks!
Frank  Cunha IIITwitter | Facebook | LinkedIn | Blog


Better Than a Selfie

cels-004-selfiecels-003-have-funEveryone likes to take a selfie (these days).  Only thing better is when someone else takes a selfie some place you helped design and build.

What: Center for Environmental Life Sciences

Where: Montclair State University

Who: Architect ; Photographer ; Builder ; Project Manager

Happy New Year!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook
FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
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Amazing Facts to Blow Your Mind via @AsapSCIENCE

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
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e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
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My Number Three | 03111211371151 — Collaboration by @FC3ZMD @Zorlone @FrankCunhaIII

Photo taken by Lorenzo Bernardino – Philippines (using iPhone) | Re-Edited by Frank Cunha III in Photoshop – USA.

The original photo taken by my friend and international collaborator, Lorenzo Bernardino, inspired me to talk about the #3 and why I think it is such a fantastic number (besides the fact that it is my name).

Here is link to other projects we have worked together on and click here to see other posts about numbers.

Original Photo taken by Lorenzo Bernardino – Philippines (using iPhone).

The following is borrowed from Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia:

Read the rest of this entry »