Materiality and Green Architecture: The Effect of Building Materials on Sustainability and Design

The types of building materials you use on your home can greatly affect the sustainability and design for years to come. Here are some high-quality, green building materials to look into for your home.

Home-2

Solar Reflective Roofing Shingles

Having high-quality roofing shingles on your house is important to help your home stay protected longer.  There are many sustainable materials on the market for roofing shingles that you should consider for your home.

One type of sustainable roofing shingles is made up of solar reflective granules with a type of polymer modified asphalt, making your roof tough and long-lasting against the effects of harsh weather. This type of material reflects solar rays that may enter your home and heat up your house which raise your electric bill for A/C. By reflecting the solar rays, the color of your roofing shingles also lasts longer, maintaining the beauty of your home for many years.

The asphalt is strong enough to keep your roofing shingles in perfect condition even during storms with high winds and high volumes of rain. This type of product will have warranties on the roofing shingles, ensuring that they will last for usually at least 12 years and in up to 110 mph wind. Investing in high-quality roofing shingles is something that you are sure to benefit from.

Home-3

Strong, Sustainable Exterior Siding

When it comes to the exterior of your home, fiber cement siding is a great alternative compared to more traditional materials like vinyl and wood. This type of siding will ensure the sustainability of your home for longer, often with a warranty of up to 50 years. With great protection against the harsh elements of the weather, fiber cement siding does not warp or fade as quickly as other materials, keeping the design of your home looking its best.

This material comes in a variety of textures so you can customize your home with whatever color and finishing look that your desire.  Fiber cement siding protects your home from water, frost, and cold weather, keeping you warm and dry. Being a product that has the designation of National Green Building Standard, fiber cement siding is a building material to use when thinking about high-quality, green architecture.

Home-1

Eco-Friendly Interior Design Material

For the interior design of your home, consider using bamboo panels. Made from bamboo grass, these panels are sustainable and support green architecture. Bamboo panels can be used in many places of your home. From cabinets to tables, and even accent walls, bamboo is an innovative material that will also give your space a modern feel.

Great for designing, this material comes in a variety of designs and textures including chocolate bamboo, natural bamboo, carbonized bamboo, and bamboo veneer. Bamboo panels are very strong and dense, long lasting and may qualify you for eco-friendly construction credits.

Picture1

Reduce Your Heating Bill with Great Insulation

Insulated concrete blocks are a great material to consider that often outperforms other building materials for the exterior of your home.

This type of material is installed as one continuous system with no breaks in the wall, ensuring complete protection of your house from bugs and elements of the weather. Insulated concrete blocks keep your house warmer in cold weather and can greatly reduce your heating bill, which is also good for the environment.

The core is made up of concrete, making this wall material durable and strong.  These concrete blocks are easier and safer to install than other materials, taking out some of the risk of constructing the exterior of your home. With this type of material, you can also design the exterior and interior walls however you would like as insulated concrete blocks come in a variety of finishes.

Picture3

Materials for Green Architecture

These eco-friendly materials can have a large effect on the sustainability and design of your home. They can increase the lifespan of your home, saving you time and money and the long run. These materials also come in a variety of designs so you can build and design your home how you want, making it the beautiful place to live that you imagined.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

 

Advertisements

@FC3ARCHITECTURE – New Project Under Construction

Dear Readers,

We are sharing a recent project we completed the design and it is currently under construction.  As you can see it is quite an expansion to a modest home.  We are happy to see it is on schedule and on budget and should be completed this summer.

IMG_0612IMG_0616IMG_0611IMG_0610IMG_0614IMG_0615IMG_0613IMG_0618IMG_0621IMG_0619IMG_0617IMG_0620IMG_0609IMG_0608We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

FRANKCUNHAIII


Latest @FC3Architecture Project UnderWay

Axonometric View

Axonometric View

Axonometric View

Axonometric View

Proposed Front Elevation - Option #1

Proposed Front Elevation – Option #1

Proposed Front Elevation - Option #2

Proposed Front Elevation – Option #2

Also Check Out:


Cachalotes House by Gonzalez Moix Arquitectura

Cachalotes House Plan

Cachalotes House
Location: Lima, Peru
Firm: Gonzalez Moix Arquitectura
Residential › Private House
Year: 2010
Photographs: Juan Solano Ojasi

Cachalotes House 01 Cachalotes House 02 Cachalotes House 03

Cachalotes House Interior 01 Cachalotes House Interior 02

Cachalotes House 04Cachalotes House Interior 03Cachalotes House Interior 04


HOT & Sensational “Sentosa House” with COOL Design Details by Nicholas Burns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Architects: Nicholas Burns
Location: Sentosa Island,  Year: 2012
All Photographs: Patrick Bingham-Hall
Content/Article/Photo Source: “Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns” 04 Dec 2012. ArchDaily.

A series of open spaces clustered against the core. The core provides, structure, vertical circulation, services and adjacent has all baths and the kitchen maximising efficiency.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Adaptable space, these open spaces and freed from pre determined function, the structure is designed to allow reconfiguration to future needs, walls can be erected where required.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Materials are chosen for their inherent qualities. Recycled golden teak, fair faced concrete, stone and steel all offer duality of function. Their richness and texture provides the decorative element.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Structure, the bones of the house are on display creating clear open space with a sense of seamlessness interconnecting with the gardens and landscape, framing views. The structural grid provides a logic, an order with which every element and detail diminishing in scale relates to and relies on.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Detail, details are painstakingly distilled and resolved, nothing is left undone. The intention is the create an ease, a wholeness, a stillness…a sense of timelessness….

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Experience, the journey through the house is one of wholeness with distinct parts offering a layered and complex series of experiences. Enclosure and compression expands to openness, the contrasts emphasis the feeling of space. Views are framed, and vary in scale, sometimes intimate and close into a court, other times expanding into borrowed landscape of the jungle and out to distant vistas.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Environment, the house is designed for the tropical climate. The recycled teak screen and desk fits over the concrete structure and glazing protecting it from the sun allowing the thermal mass of the concrete to stabilise the internal temperature. Cross ventilation, the other critical element of tropical design is maximises, the glass openness allowing even slight breezes to freely flow throughout he house creating a level of comfort. On the mechanical side, the climate control is the energy efficient aided by double glazing. The hot water is heated using a heat pump, utilising the free heat form the air and then circulated so hot water is available at taps with wasting water. Materials are reduced, the structure is exposed. The structural design using flat slabs reduces concrete usage by 25%. All of the timber is recycled. All of the materials are chosen to minimise surface treatments and unnecessary materials.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Landscape, the landscape uses species that suit the climate, that thrive with minimal intervention. The rear area merges with the jungle enhancing the element of borrowed landscape

  
 Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-HallSentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall

@FC3ARCHITECTURE – Restoration to a Custom Home – Currently Under Construction (Northern NJ)

FC3 Architecture + Design LLC was brought on board as the design professional to address the damage to this existing home due to plumbing failures.  This large four-bedroom suburban home located in Northern NJ (approximately 5,690 square feet) is in the process of being completely restored — just about every square inch of the home was damaged, repaired, and restored.  This presentation chronicles the “before” and “during construction” photographs.  We hope to upload the photos of the final project in the near future.

1279_DSC2341

1279_DSC2288

PROJECT COST:
Withheld

HOME OWNER:
Withheld

CONTRACTOR:
QUALITY CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN, LLC
17 New Hampshire Street
Newton, NJ 07860

ARCHITECT:
Frank Cunha III, AIA, NCARB, LEED Green Assoc.
Principal / CEO / Registered Architect
Licensed in CT, DE, FL, NJ, NY, PA
Website: http://www.frankcunha.com

ARCHITECTURE FIRM:
FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335
Hamburg, NJ 07419
Tel. (973) 718.4640
Fax. (973) 718.4641
Email: fcunha@fc3arch.com
Website: http://fc3arch.com
Blog: https://fc3arch.wordpress.com/about-frank

I.LM.A. Team
I Love My Architect – Facebook


WHAT SHOULD I LOOK FOR WHEN HIRING AN AIA ARCHITECT?

Ask the Architect


by Frank Cunha III

How Do I Hire an Architect?

Everyone’s needs are different   To make sure you get the best person for your project, you should request information on qualifications and experience from a few AIA Architects. After reviewing their qualifications, you may want to interview a number of AIA Architects to determine their understanding of your project and your compatibility. Make sure you select someone you can work with (not just the least expensive fee).  During the selection process, you may want to ask some or all of the following questions:

General Information

  1.  How long have you been in business?
  2.  How many persons are employed by your firm?
  3. Do you have a valid Architect’s license for the state you are doing the design work? If so, what is your license number?
  4. How have you kept current in your practice?
  5. Do you intend to use consultants for this project? If so, who do you propose to use? What are their qualifications?
  6. What has been your experience with them?
  7. What percentage of your practice involves the type of structure I intend to build/renovate?
  8. Do you carry insurance? If so, what type(s)? How long have you carried each type and what are the policy limits?

Experience

  1. Have you recently designed the type of structure I intend to build / renovate? How many times?
  2.  When and what was your most recent project?
  3.  May I see examples of your previous projects that are similar to my project (sketches, photos, plans)?
  4.  May I have the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of the clients for these previous similar projects?
  5.  What was the actual construction cost versus budgeted cost for these projects?

Services

  1. What services did you provide for these clients during the design, bidding, and construction phases?
  2. What services do you propose to provide for my project during each of these phases?
  3. Who will provide these services, you or your employees?

Fees & Schedule

  1. What will the fee schedule be?
  2. How will your fees for my project be determined and what services do the fees cover?
  3. Will you provide probable construction cost estimates for my project?
  4. If consultants (civil, structural, mechanical, electrical, geotechnical, testing and inspection, etc.) are necessary, are their fees included in your basic fee or are they separate services?
  5. What additional costs (e.g., permit and other governmental fees) or services (e.g., time spent obtaining necessary permits and other approvals) do you anticipate for my project?
  6. How do you establish your fees for additional services and reimbursable expenses?
  7. Will there be a charge for redesign if it is necessary to meet the construction budget?
  8. Will there be additional charges for changes required by the building department or other government agency?
  9. How are additional charges computed for design changes requested by me or requested by a contractor?
  10. Can you meet my proposed schedule?

Making the Final Decision

It is wise to check the references that each AIA Architect gives you and ask the following questions:

  1. Did the Architect adhere to required schedules and budgets?
  2. Were you pleased with the Architect’s services and your working relationship with the Architect?
  3. Did the Architect listen to your concerns and attempt to resolve them?
  4. Would you hire the Architect again?
  5. What problems surfaced during the project?
  6. If possible, visit the projects the Architects have used as examples of their services.
  7. In addition, you may call the State Board of Architects or visit their website to verify the license status of any Architect(s) you are considering. Upon written or telephone inquiry, the Board will also inform you of any public complaints, or enforcement or disciplinary action against the Architect.

Example: Building Section – Commercial Project

Architect-Sketch

Example: Architect’s Concept – Residential Floor Plan Sketch

Note:

When responding to advertisements or solicitations offering professional Architectural Design Services, disaster victims should verify whether the person offering services has a valid license. Only persons licensed by the State Board of Architects may call themselves architects and provide Architectural Design Services.

During a declared state of emergency, the penalty against an unlicensed person who represents that he or she is an Architect in connection with the offer or performance of architectural services for the repair of damage to a structure caused by a natural disaster is increased and punishable (enforcement and punishments varies by state).

Important Links:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.