The ‘Allegory of the Cave’

The Allegory of the Cave is a story from Book VII in the Greek philosopher Plato‘s masterpiece The Republic, written in 517 BCE. It is probably Plato’s best-known story, and its placement in The Republic is significant, because The Republic is the centerpiece of Plato’s philosophy, and centrally concerned with how people acquire knowledge about beauty, justice, and good. The Allegory of the Cave uses a metaphor of prisoners kept chained in the dark to explain the difficulties of reaching and sustaining a just and intellectual spirit.

The ‘Allegory Of The Cave‘ is a theory put forward by Plato, concerning human perception. Plato claimed that knowledge gained through the senses is no more than opinion and that, in order to have real knowledge, we must gain it through philosophical reasoning.

Plato’s “The Republic Book 7” ‘On Shadows and Realities in Education

As our interaction with technology accounts for more of each day, I cannot help but wonder if our perceptions of reality will shift as a civilization. What is real and what is an illusion?

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My 10 All-Time Favorite Architecture Books by @FrankCunhaIII plus a BONUS Book (Updated with Video & Audio Track)

Audio Version:

https://soundcloud.com/frank-cunha-iii/my-top-10-architecture-books

These are my top Architecture books to read:

(#10)

A History of Architecture: Settings and Rituals
By Spiro Kostof

(#9)

Architecture and Disjunction
By Bernard Tschumi

(#8)

Delirious New York: A Retroactive Manifesto for Manhattan
By Rem Koolhaas

(#7)

Intertwining
By Steven Holl

(#6)

Learning from Las Vegas – Revised Edition: The Forgotten Symbolism of Architectural Form
By Robert Venturi, Steven Izenour, Denise Scott Brown

(#5)

S M L XL
Rem Koolhaas

(#4)

The Space of Encounter
By Daniel Libeskind

(#3)

Ten Books on Architecture
By Vitruvius

(#2)

Towards a New Architecture
By Le Corbusier

(#1)

A Field Guide to American Houses: The Definitive Guide to Identifying and Understanding America’s Domestic Architecture
By Virginia Savage McAlester

BONUS!

Mask of Medusa
By John Hejduk

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FRANK CUNHA III
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Contemporary Philosophy – Postmodernism & Critical Theory – Álvaro Siza Vieira

Álvaro Siza Vieira

Broadly and variously defined, Postmodernism refers to a specific period of time that began in the 1940s, a style of literature, architecture, art philosophy, or the plight of Western society in post-capitalist age.  This movement encompasses a set of critical and rhetorical practicesemploying concepts such as difference, repetition, and hyperreality to break apart or deconstruct other the structural elements achieved through modernism, including temporality, presence, identity, historical progress, epistemic certainty, and meaning achieved through unity.  For more information on Postmodernism, please click here.

Álvaro Joaquim de Melo Siza VieiraGOSEGCIH, is a contemporary Portuguese architect, born 25 June 1933 in Matosinhos a small coastal town by Porto. He is internationally known as Álvaro Siza (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈaɫvɐɾu ˈsizɐ].

He graduated in architecture in 1955, at the former School of Fine Arts from the University of Porto, the current FAUP – Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto. He completed his first built work (four houses in Matosinhos) even before ending his studies in 1954, the same year that he first opened his private practice in Porto. Siza Vieira taught at the school from 1966 to 1969, returning in 1976. In addition to his teaching there, he has been a visiting professor at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University; the University of Pennsylvania; Los Andes University of Bogota; and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne.

Along with Fernando Távora, he is one of the references of the Porto School of Architecture where both were teachers. Both architects worked together between 1955 and 1958. Another architect he has collaborated with is Eduardo Souto de Moura, e.g. on Portugal’s flagship pavilions at Expo 98 in Lisbon and Expo 2000 in Hannover, as well as on the Serpentine Pavillon 2005. Siza’s work is often described as “poetic modernism“; he himself has contributed to publications on Luis Barragán.

Most of his best known works are located in his hometown Porto: the Boa Nova Tea House (1963), the Faculty of Architecture (1987–93), and the Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art (1997). Since the mid-1970s, Siza has been involved in numerous designs for public housing and universities. Most recently, he started coordinating the rehabilitation of the monuments and architectonic heritage of Cidade Velha (Old Village) in Santiago, an island of Cape Verde.

Álvaro Siza Vieira Hompage

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Contemporary Philosophy, Critical Theory and Postmodern Thought

Theodor Adorno Louis Althusser Roland Barthes
Michael Bakhtin Jean Baudrillard Walter Benjamin
Maurice Blanchot Kenneth Burke Albert Borgmann
Jacques Derrida Gilles Deleuze Terry Eagleton
Stanley Fish Michel Foucault Frankfurt School
Hans-George Gadamer Anthony Giddens Antonio Gramsci
Felix Guattari Jurgen Habermas Donna Haraway
Martin Heidegger Agnes Heller Max Horkheimer
Edmund Husserl Ivan Illich Fredric Jameson
Julia Kristeva Jacques Lacan Bruno Latour
Jean Francois Lyotard Georg Lukács Paul de Man
Herbert Marcuse Karl Marx Maurice Merleau-Ponty
Richard Rorty Jean-Paul Sartre Edward Said
Charles Taylor Paul Virilio Ludwig Wittgenstein

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Frank Cunha III
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Gordon Matta-Clark

Gordon Matta-Clark (June 22, 1943– August 27, 1978) was an American Artist best known for his site-specific artworks he made in the 1970s. He is famous for his “building cuts,” a series of works in abandoned buildings in which he variously removed sections of floors, ceilings, and walls.

In the early 1970s as part of the Anarchitecture group, Matta-Clark was interested in the idea of entropy, metamorphic gaps, and leftover/ambiguous space. Fake Estates was a project engaged with the issue of land ownership and the myth of the American dream – that everyone could become “landed gentry” by owning property. Matta-Clark “buys” into this dream by purchasing 15 leftover and unwanted properties in Manhattan for $25–$75 a plot. Ironically, these “estates” were unusable or inaccessible for development, and so his ability to capitalize on the land, and thus his ownership of them, existed virtually only on paper.

In 1971 Matta-Clark cofounded Food, in SoHoNew York, with Carol Goodden, a restaurant managed and staffed by artists. The restaurant turned dining into an event with an open kitchen and exotic ingredients that celebrated cooking. The activities at Food helped delineate how the art community defined itself in downtown Manhattan.  The first of its kind in SoHo, Food became well known among artists and was a central meeting-place for groups such as the Philip Glass EnsembleMabou Mines, and the dancers of Grand Union. He ran Food until 1973.

In 1974, he performed a literal deconstruction, by removing the facade of a condemned house along the Love Canal, and moving the resulting walls to Artpark, in his work Bingo.

For the Biennale de Paris in 1975, he made the piece titled Conical Intersect by cutting a large cone-shaped hole through two townhouses dating from the 17th century in the market district known as Les Halleswhich were to be knocked down in order to construct the then-controversial Centre Georges Pompidou.

For his final major project, Circus or The Caribbean Orange (1978), Matta-Clark made circle cuts in the walls and floors of a townhouse next-door to the first Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, building (237 East Ontario Street), thus altering the space entirely. Following his 1978 project, the MCA presented two retrospectives of Matta-Clark’s work, in 1985 and in 2008.  The 2008 exhibition You Are the Measure included never-before-displayed archival material of his 1978 Chicago project. You Are the Measure traveled to the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.