ILMA of the Week: Frank L. Wright

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Frank Lloyd Wright (born Frank Lincoln Wright, June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American Architect, interior designer, writer and educator, who designed more than 1,000 structures and completed 532 works. Wright believed in designing structures which were in harmony with humanity and its environment, a philosophy he called organic architecture. This philosophy was best exemplified by his design for Fallingwater (1935) featured in the photo above, which has been called “the best all-time work of American Architecture“. Wright was a leader of the Prairie School movement of architecture and developed the concept of the Usonian home, his unique vision for urban planning in the United States.

Wright’s portfolio includes original and innovative examples of many different building types, including offices, churches, schools, skyscrapers, hotels, and museums. Wright also designed many of the interior elements of his buildings, such as the furniture and stained glass. Wright authored 20 books and many articles and was a popular lecturer in the United States and in Europe. His colorful personal life often made headlines, most notably for the 1914 fire and murders at his Taliesin studio. Already well known during his lifetime, Wright was recognized in 1991 by the American Institute of Architects as “the greatest American architect of all time.”

Wright’s most famous private residences —Fallingwater— was built from 1934 to 1937 for Mr. and Mrs. Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr., at Mill Run, Pennsylvania, not too far from Pittsburgh. It was designed according to Wright’s desire to place the occupants close to the natural surroundings, with a stream and waterfall running under part of the building. Wright wanted the new residences to live with the waterfalls, to make them part of their everyday lives. He didn’t want them to just look at them every now and again. Constructed over a 30-foot waterfall, the house may look very big on the outside but on the inside it is quite small, which surprises some visitors. It was made with three bedrooms, a massive living room and a dining room. The house was more of a design for a family getaway not for a live-in family. The construction is a series of cantilevered balconies and terraces, using limestone for all verticals and concrete for the horizontals. The house cost $155,000, including the architect’s fee of $8,000. It was one of Wright’s most expensive pieces. Kaufmann’s own engineers argued that the design was not sound. They were overruled by Wright, but the contractor secretly added extra steel to the horizontal concrete elements. In 1994, Robert Silman and Associates examined the building and developed a plan to restore the structure. In the late 1990s, steel supports were added under the lowest cantilever until a detailed structural analysis could be done. In March 2002, post-tensioning of the lowest terrace was completed.

The iconic “Guggenheim Museum” (also featured in the photo above) is located in New York City. This project kept Wright occupied for 16 years (1943–1959) and is probably his most recognized masterpiece. The building rises as a warm beige spiral from its site on Fifth Avenue; its interior is similar to the inside of a seashell. Its unique central geometry was meant to allow visitors to easily experience Guggenheim’s collection of nonobjective geometric paintings by taking an elevator to the top level and then viewing artworks by walking down the slowly descending, central spiral ramp, the floor of which is embedded with circular shapes and triangular light fixtures to complement the geometric nature of the structure. However, when the museum was completed, a number of details of Wright’s design were ignored, such as his desire for the interior to be painted off-white. Further, the Museum currently designs exhibits to be viewed by walking up the curved walkway rather than walking down from the top level.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in CT, DE, FL, NJ, NY, PA.


Meet “WENDY” @MoMAPS1 (by @HWKN_arch)

Wendy by HWKN (Image Rights: HWKN)

Wendy by HWKN

July 1, 2012—September 8, 2012

The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 announce HWKN (Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner, New York) as the winner of the annual Young Architects Program (YAP) in New York. Now in its 13th edition, the Young Architects Program at MoMA and MoMA PS1 has been committed to offering emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary, outdoor installation at MoMA PS1 that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling. HWKN, drawn from among five finalists, will design a temporary urban landscape for the 2012 Warm Up summer music series in MoMA PS1’s outdoor courtyard.  Buy Wendy (Click Here).

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Wendy sits far enough away from the stage used for the annual Warm Up events to let the concerts go on unimpeded, but close enough to the entrance to create a filter and initial impact to visitors. It bridges over the walls into the large and small courtyards of MoMA PS1.

Wendy features a simple, inexpensive construction system: the scaffold is deployed efficiently to create a 70’ x 70’ x 45’ volume to form the largest surface area possible.

Click here to see the rest of the story and click here to see more work by HWKN.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://www.fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Art And Poetry By My Friend Karen Glosser @kglosserdesigns

We are always pleased when our online friends agree to an interview on our blog.  Our latest Expose features my colleague and friend, Karen Glosser, who creates mixed metal and stone jewelry with a modern edge in Chautauqua NY.

“We cannot hold a torch to light another’s path without brightening our own.” -Ben Sweetland (Photo by Karen Glosser)

KG Portrait (Artwork by Frank Cunha III)

Seeing your new photo art each day is inspiring.  Can you tell us about your latest artwork?

Thank you so much!  My photographs are something that I use as inspiration in my life and as a tool to help me design and create as a jewelry artist.   I carry my camera with me always, everywhere.  It’s amazing how my perception of everyday life has changed since I’ve started to look through the lens of a camera. There is so much beauty everywhere- all around us!

Can you explain your artistic process?  Which artists/photographers are you influenced by?

Because I always have my camera ready, I take a lot of pictures. I usually don’t go out looking for certain subjects or topics. When I see something that strikes me, I take a few shots. Then, periodically, or when I am designing a new collection, I go back through and I often notice themes running through my photos. I use this as a jumping off point for design inspiration.

Can you explain your artistic process?  Which artists/photographers are you influenced by?

I am greatly influenced by art.  Color is a huge inspiration for me, so I love to spend time in galleries and museums, online, or reading books. My favorite artists are Mark Rothko and Clyfford Still. Their use of color is masterful. I also find great design and life inspiration from Simon Alcantara, a genius jewelry designer. As far as photography?

I find great inspiration from the photos of the amazing Frank Cunha III !!!

Have you ever considered publishing an ebook of your work?

As a matter of fact, no.  I never have. Hmmmm….

I am glad we put that thought in your head!

Read the rest of this entry »


New York, New York

New York, New York, a helluva town. The Bronx is up, but the Battery’s down. The people ride in a hole in the groun’. New York, New York, it’s a helluva town!!


NYC Highline Revisted

I have been tracking the progress of the NYC Highline ever since I worked on an Ideas Competition
back in 2000. 

For some of my past designs on the HL – check out this link.    

 

Beautiful NYC Stranger


Here is some newer stuff from 
earlier this year  (Part 1)  and  (Part 2)
and the “Beautiful Stranger” photographic art set  (Part 1)  and  (Part 2).


Lincoln Restaurant Pavilion

Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with FXFOWLE
Written by Linda C. Lentz

Lincoln Restaurant Pavilion & Lawn by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with FXFOWLE
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Lincoln Restaurant Pavilion & Lawn
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Built up on a plinth, and clad in relentless swaths of travertine, Lincoln Center was once considered by many to be a remote acropolis of culture. A half century after it was built, the iconic mid-20th-century performing arts compound is coming down to earth, or at least to the surrounding streets of New York City’s Upper West Side.

The podium and stone remain. But a whimsical glass pavilion — the latest phase in the eight-year redevelopment of the 16-acre campus by collaborating firms Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DSR) and FXFOWLE — is engaging theatergoers, tourists, and the neighboring community with a first-rate restaurant, state-of-the-art film center, and a rare patch of urban green on its roof.

Indeed, this populist intervention in many ways culminates the team’s efforts to revitalize the complex and its intersecting thoroughfare, West Sixty-Fifth Street, a master plan initiative responsible for the previously completed Alice Tully Hall renovation[RECORD, June 2009], and the Juilliard School extension [RECORD, February 2011]. This is largely due to the comprehensive 40,000-square-foot project’s strategic location on the site, as well as the critical programmatic elements the architects were required to incorporate into it: cultural, public, and private.

Read the rest of the article by clicking here


Quick Fix with Sweet Fix Take Three with FC3

I had another terrific opportunity to shoot with the SWEET FIX group, this time at a New York City subway station for their upcoming single “FM Radio” (appropriately the F and M lines in mid-town). To lend a hand was Dee Portera who helped me photograph the boys: Tommy Walker (Lead Vocals), Ivan Anderson (Guitar, Back Up Vocals), Bill Sapanaro (Bass), Marco Santini (Drums). And tonight (May 14, 2011) they are playing at the Crash Mansion (199 Bowery, New York, NY) if you want to come out and support them (RSVP here).  Also check them out on Facebook, MySpace, ReverbNation and Twitter.  More Sweet Fix by FC3 here.