Connected Spaces

Connected-Life

The internet of things, or IoT, is a system of interrelated computing devices, mechanical and digital machines, objects, animals or people that are provided with unique identifiers and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction.

Connected spaces are networked to enable the interconnection and interoperability of multiple devices, services and apps, ranging from communications and entertainment to healthcare, security and home automation. These services and apps are delivered over multiple interlinked and integrated devices, sensors, tools and platforms. Connected, real-time, smart and contextual experiences are provided for the household inhabitants, and individuals are enabled to control and monitor the home remotely as well as within it.

Connected-HomeThe technologies behind connected spaces can be grouped in the following categories:

  • Networking: Familiar networking technologies (high bandwidth/high power consumption), such as Multimedia over Coax Alliance (MoCA), Ethernet, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, as well as 3G and Long Term Evolution (LTE), are complemented with low-power consumption networking standards for devices and sensors that require low bandwidth and consume very little power, such as thermostats.
  • Media and Entertainment: This category, which covers integrated entertainment systems and includes accessing and sharing digital content across different devices, has proved to be the most prolific and contains some of the most mature technologies in the connected home.
  • Security, Monitoring and Automation: The technologies in this category cover a variety of services that focus on monitoring and protecting the home as well as the remote and automated control of doors, windows, blinds and locks, heating/air conditioning, lighting and home appliances, and more.
  • Energy Management: This category is tightly linked to smart cities and government initiatives, yet consumer services and devices/apps are being introduced at mass-market prices that allow people to track, control and monitor their gas/electricity consumption.
  • Healthcare, Fitness and Wellness: Solutions and services around healthcare have proven slow to take off, because they have to be positioned within a health plan and sold to hospitals and health insurance companies. The fitness and wellness segment has strong and quickly developed ecosystems that range from devices to sports wares to apps, which integrate seamlessly with each other to create a strong customer experience.

(Source: https://www.gartner.com)

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Big Data in Architecture

Big-Data-02Big data is a term that describes the large volume of data – both structured and unstructured – that inundates a business on a day-to-day basis. But it’s not the amount of data that’s important. It’s what organizations do with the data that matters. Big data can be analyzed for insights that lead to better decisions and strategic business moves.

(Source: https://www.sas.com/en_us/insights/big-data/what-is-big-data.html)

In buildings, data might be generated by a very wide variety of sources, including:

  • Design and construction (for example building information modeling)
  • Post occupancy evaluation
  • Utilities, building services, meters, building management systems and so on
  • Infrastructure and transport systems
  • Enterprise systems such as purchasing systems, performance reporting, work
    scheduling and so on
  • Maintenance and replacement systems
  • Operational cost monitoring
  • Information and Communications Technology (ICT) systems and equipment

Data from these sources can be used to understand behavior, assess
performance, improve market competitiveness, allocate resources and so on.
Smart buildings focus on the use of these interconnected technologies to make
buildings more intelligent and responsive, ultimately improving their performance, and
might include technologies such as:

  • Automated systems
  • Intelligent building management systems
  • Energy efficiency measures
  • Wireless technologies
  • Digital infrastructures
  • Adaptive energy systems
  • Networked appliances
  • Data gathering devices
  • Information and communications networks
  • Assistive technologies
  • Remote monitoring
  • Fault diagnostics and prognostics

(Source:https://medium.com/studiotmd/designing-with-data-8fd73345afb8)

Big-Data-01{Repost} How Big Data is Transforming Architecture

The phenomenon presents huge opportunities for the built environment and the firms that design it.

Clients are demanding data from architects

Clients are starting to ask architects to deliver more than just drawing sets. They are eyeing the data-rich BIM models that firms use to document projects as a way to supply data for downstream applications, such as facilities management.

With BIM achieving some level of maturity within the industry, there is a growing expectation that architects will produce datasets, such as the COBie (Construction-Operations Building Information Exchange) spreadsheet, as part of their regular deliverables. The COBie spreadsheet is essentially a list of building assets—such as chairs and HVAC systems—that the owner can then use to manage the facility. Next year, the U.K. government will require architects working on any publicly funded project to produce COBie spreadsheets. For architects, this means that their data needs to be as rigorous as their drawings.

Clients are demanding data from buildings

Clients have also become interested in the data generated by the buildings. As previously mentioned, everything from thermostats to doors is being connected to the Internet so it can broadcast its use. At last year’s Venice Biennale, the exhibition’s director Rem Koolhaas, Hon. FAIA, predicted that “every architectural element is about to associate itself with data-driven technology.”

This data enables building owners to measure and improve their facilities’ performance quantitatively. Many are already doing this—albeit in a limited sense—with their HVAC systems. But what we are seeing from innovative building owners is the use of data to conduct a holistic assessment of their performance. The Walt Disney Co., for example, combines location tracking with sales data and other user-experience metrics to optimize the performance of its parks. As more owners come to rely on building data to improve the performance of their assets, architects need to ensure that their buildings can supply this critical data.

Data is changing the process as much as it is changes the output

The abundance of data may give rise to data warehouses and COBie spreadsheets, but the much more profound changes for architects will be procedural. For instance, using BIM to design and document a building has required a whole new set of business processes. The building might be visually similar to what would have been designed in the past, but everything behind the scenes, from contract wording to staff training, needs to be rethought.

(Source: http://www.architectmagazine.com/technology/how-big-data-is-transforming-architecture_o)

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook