How Many Architects Are There in the World?

Monditalia infographic; via ArchDaily

Monditalia infographic; via ArchDaily

(Source: https://architizer.com/blog/inspiration/industry/how-many-architects-are-in-the-world)

And in the U.S.?

There are 109,748 Architects

According to The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards, there are 109,748 architects in the United States, according to the 2016 Survey of Architectural Registration Boards. While this represents a minimal drop from the previous year (roughly .4 percent), the survey also reveals that architects increasingly hold licenses in multiple states. In fact, U.S. architects now have 126,554 reciprocal (out-of-state) licenses, a 3 percent increase from 2015.

Conducted annually by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), the survey provides exclusive insight into the number of U.S. architects and reciprocal licenses.

The pool of emerging professionals working toward licensure also held steady in 2016, with more than 41,400 candidates taking the Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®) and/or reporting Architectural Experience Program (AXP) hours.

“Our data confirms that the economy is generating strong demand for initial and reciprocal licensees,” said NCARB CEO Michael J. Armstrong. “We’re also seeing continued growth in the number of architects who hold an NCARB Certificate, which facilitates reciprocal licensure across the U.S. and several countries.”

Additional data on the path to licensure will be available in July’s 2017 edition of NCARB by the Numbers.

NCARB collects data on resident and reciprocal licenses from its 54 Member Boards, which include the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The survey reflects registration data from January to December 2016.

To learn more about NCARB’s data and the Survey of Architectural Registration Boards, visit www.ncarb.org.

Twitter: www.twitter.com/ncarb
Facebook: www.facebook.com/NCARB
YouTube: www.youtube.com/NCARBorg
(Source: https://www.ncarb.org/press/number-us-architects-2016)

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


NEWS FLASH – @FrankCunhaIII Update

Dear friends, clients, and colleagues,

We are happy to report that Frank Cunha III, founder of FC3Architecture and I Love My Architect, is currently seeking reciprocity as a Registered Architect in the following states:

  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Maryland
  • Virginia

Once processed and finalized, Frank will be able to legally practice Architecture in the states listed above, along with the the states he is currently licensed:

  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • Pennsylvania

Additionally, Frank Cunha III, has become a USGBC Green Associate (click here for more information).

FC3USGBC

Join us in congratulating Frank on his new accreditation and wishing him luck on his future licenses!

I.L.M.A. Team
I Love My Architect – Facebook

Also Check Out These Great Links:


Going Green? We Can help! @FC3ARCHITECT

Most, if not all, of our design and construction projects have had green components over the past 15 years.  Not sure where to start?  Give us a call at (201) 681-3551 or email us.

Going Green? We Can Help!

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We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
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web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Order, Formulas, and Rules

by Frank Cunha III

It seems like when you finally get it right in Architecture, Art, Music, Fashion, etc, you become a “sellout.”  So what is Right? How can we get it right? Will anyone know the difference?  In the music industry, record companies spend millions studying what kind of music we enjoy.  Recently I heard that they have developed a formula for what makes great music whether we consciously agree or not (they call it “musically satisfying”).  Is it any wonder we get those cheesy songs stuck in our head?  This comes as no surprise in a technologically advanced and transformative world.  Could the same be true for Architecture (Architecturally satisfying)?

Like many other Architects, I subscribe to hard copies and digital copies of various Art & Architecture magazines.  It’s fun to see all the new and exciting international projects that have been commissioned.  It’s also frustrating to see that many of the projects follow some sort of formula – It is easy/difficult to put a finger on it but given an opportunity – Budget, Client, Program, couldn’t we too fudge, I mean design something similar?  I remember an old college professor telling us how in his day he had to study / copy the Masters of his day for Architecture School.

I am pretty sure I did not miss class the day they taught the secret formula to creating great Architecture – Which leads me to ask, What is great?  I mean, we all have our opinions on the Masters of our day – Good or Bad.  What I mean to ask is something that delves deeper.  Besides the ability to obtain intellectual clients with extremely high budgets looking for “meaningful” design, how do these high profile Architects / Architecture firms land these clients?  Once they figure out this formula is it a matter of fine-tuning it and repeating it?

Although Architecture is filled with Order & Rules (figuratively and literally) should there be a Formula to producing great works of Architecture?

I would think that a world without figurative Order & Rules of today’s contemporary Architecture (that results in the “Same” different Architecture, the same way someone dyes their hair pink or blue to be different, to be like their friends) would result in a more meaningful, natural world of Architecture filled with unique projects emulating real emotion and artfulness.  When Architecture (or Music for that matter) begins to repeat these figurative patterns it also eliminates the artfulness of the unknown. The mystery of Architecture is not in the mathematics or science of Architecture but in it’s naïve soulfulness.  That is where I believe the true spirit of Architecture resides.