Diller Scofidio + Renfro: Reimagining Lincoln Center and the High Line

Diller Scofidio + Renfro: Reimagining Lincoln Center and the High Line. At a lean 54 minutes, it’s more straightforward than intimate. But its biographical sketch of, primarily, Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio has a surprising amount of depth as it charts their evolution from a firm known for imaginative art installations to in-demand architects. The film also probes what Scofidio calls the blurring of “boundaries between what is public and what is private” by focusing specifically (but not exclusively) on the work that went into New York’s High Line park and the redevelopment of the city’s Lincoln Center. Both projects—and the greater issue of public versus private spaces—promise to provoke discussion at a panel organized around the film.

“The conversations that happen between the films are really one of the most important parts of the festival” Bergman says. We’re trying to raise the level of design dialogue, not just among pros, but among engineers and lawyers and pediatricians and people who make pizza. As an Architect, that’s something that I think is really good for the profession.  It may even be a great place to discover a Beautiful Stranger or take a look at the NJ Skyline at sunset!!!

To learn more about the NYC High Line click here.

Sincerely,

Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


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Lincoln Restaurant Pavilion

Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with FXFOWLE
Written by Linda C. Lentz

Lincoln Restaurant Pavilion & Lawn by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with FXFOWLE
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Lincoln Restaurant Pavilion & Lawn
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Built up on a plinth, and clad in relentless swaths of travertine, Lincoln Center was once considered by many to be a remote acropolis of culture. A half century after it was built, the iconic mid-20th-century performing arts compound is coming down to earth, or at least to the surrounding streets of New York City’s Upper West Side.

The podium and stone remain. But a whimsical glass pavilion — the latest phase in the eight-year redevelopment of the 16-acre campus by collaborating firms Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DSR) and FXFOWLE — is engaging theatergoers, tourists, and the neighboring community with a first-rate restaurant, state-of-the-art film center, and a rare patch of urban green on its roof.

Indeed, this populist intervention in many ways culminates the team’s efforts to revitalize the complex and its intersecting thoroughfare, West Sixty-Fifth Street, a master plan initiative responsible for the previously completed Alice Tully Hall renovation[RECORD, June 2009], and the Juilliard School extension [RECORD, February 2011]. This is largely due to the comprehensive 40,000-square-foot project’s strategic location on the site, as well as the critical programmatic elements the architects were required to incorporate into it: cultural, public, and private.

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