Art And Poetry By My Friend Sophia Fine @SophiaFine

I wanted to share one of my dearest Twitter supporters and friends, Sophia Fine who is a Fine Arts graduate.  She successfully completed her independent studies in Florence, Italy and was recognized and awarded for her contributions to Literature and Drama. Now she is well-respected in the art-community and is involved in various art shows, solo expositions, and selling her original artwork both in America and overseas.  Click here for more on Sophia and how to contact her online if you are interested in her artwork.  Click here for our last ILMA post on Sophia.

AMOURS SOUS LE CIEL  48X60

AMOURS SOUS LE CIEL  48X60
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/A/Amours_Sous_Le_Ciel_Bleu-big.jpg

“Because the blue of day and night is the perfect setting for dreams
and mystery.
Because it is where great adventures begin.
Learn to feel the sky, the wind, and the desire to soar and keep going!”
S.F.

ARDEN MESSENGER  54X54
ARDEN MESSENGER  54X54
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/A/Ardent_Messenger-big.jpg

“Secret life with the same thought:
In our ferocious lives under these skies we desperately want to be loved…
I am airlifted to raging happiness, thrills, and… fears.”  S.F.

Bilderberg

BILDERBERG  48X60
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/B/Bilderberg-big.jpg

” Chock full of lively! They weave magic spells but can also be
mischievously playful! All these thematic fairies daringly
complimenting each other.
I lived with them when they invaded my privacy of thought.
And one by one escaped from Dream to Reality, creating their utopia
and the tangible. Dreams are made of this.
Need not define their abstraction.
Have no control of that.” S,F.

Le Ciel Provocador

LE CIEL PROVOCADOR  48X72
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/L/Le_Ciel_Provocador-big.jpg

“I am shaken under the skies in my essential solitude, running for
cover under the cottony cumuli… intergalactic warriors grouping
against the soft blue that is dotted here and there with balls of
clouds.
I exhale…
Learn to feel the sky, the wind, and the desire to soar and keep going!”  S.F.

SOLO MATADOR  54X54

SOLO MATADOR  54X54
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/S/Solo_Matador-big.jpg

“The sky is ending the night and
I follow, only follow to charge my dream

Invitation to instant exoticism…
A fantasy performed free from evocation.

In front of my eyes the endless silhouette of a Matador
becomes elegance in motion.

Before me his face suspended from his golden locks
eyes brilliant, reading my soul, rushing my heartbeat…

My trembling voice reveals my aim…
If I only could…

—let yourself go with the wind.” S.F.

Parlement

PARLEMENT  50X50
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/P/Parlement-big.jpg

“The Gray of Mystery..The Gray of revolt of Fear..The Gray echoes
melodies played on a white piano..
These scores are the musical transcriptions of the image..of Parlement!” S.F.

ELECTRIC BALADE  48X60

ELECTRIC BALADE  48X60
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/E/Electric_Balade-big.jpg

“The smash hit of the evening was the Electric Ingénue and her music.
More naked than dressed in her flowing glow, wrapped in a powdery
flower scent and thigh high jeweled boots..she caught the breathless
desire of everyone in the room..
Her entrance signaled the presence of a New Generation..” S.F.

Thinking of You

THINKING OF YOU  48X48
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/T/Thinking_of_You-big.jpg

“A sun ray caressing my face brought you in to me..
loss of thought now..

..in the essence of intimacy
the right moment..

“For members only” space of mind now is yours…
How do I go about?

My essence of intimacy fractured…
Am I at a loss?

Spirits of beasts want my soul..
fading the rush in eyes wide open..

Your magic wand can change seahorses to dragonflies..
I don’t want to change..

only let your destination become my own…

Colormusic my constant reference creates my thoughts..

…and through the looking glass
i see -you- now..

.. and hear the echos from the walls of Palazzo Grassi:

“Where are we going?” S.F.

RENCONTRES  30X40

RENCONTRES  30X40
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/R/Rencontres-big.jpg

“Setting the tone.That is my vocation. A wonderous job. It is veering
from the extreme concentration of the moments, meticulous as measuring
the right amount of coloring for the total freedom to create.
But it is such a place to be! This immersion in color, that midway, in
the journey, I know the expression.. I see the final stage! Dazed and
befuddled..coraled out, this moment is all mine!
In my studio…” S.F.

Also Check Out:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Significant Architecture : 2012

Significant Architecture : 2012
By Frank Cunha III, AIA

There is so much going on in the world of Architecture around us today and so many interesting projects that to only select 10 significant projects proves difficult if not impossible.  I hope that the following offers a glimpse to what I have been exposed to recently. I also want to apologize in advance for the scores of projects I missed but I hope are immortalized here with their counterparts.

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Architectural Revival – United Nations Headquarters

Whenever we as Architects think of our projects we seldom think of them as “temporary.”  Afterall, one of the things we strive for as Architects is immortality.  Our desire is that our souls live on in the buildings and spaces that we create.  That is why I wanted to select recent project that incorporated the revitalization of a masterful work of architecture.  Here is an example of what is possible when a project is revisited and enhanced to meet the needs of its occupants.  I also wanted to show case this building because of what is stands for and as an example of how far Architecture is able to reach people across the globe and able to unite us as a family of human beings.

International Style – Revival of an Icon: The United Nations renovation team brings back the long-faded luster of the Secretariat while satisfying ambitious performance goals.

The following was originally published in an Observer article “U.N. Architects Back to the Drawing Board; Pritzker Winner Still on Board” by Matt Chaban:

“The United Nations has a long tradition of employing the world’s finest architects.

The original Secretariat complex was the work of Le Corbusier and Oscar Niemeyer, two of the most revered designers ever to pick up a T-square. DC-1 and DC-2, the 1976 expansion of the campus better known as U.N. Plaza, was designed by Kevin Roche, builder of many New York towers and heir to the throne of Eero Saarinen.

In 2002, when it came time to plan for a new tower to house this globetrotting workforce, the United Nations Development Corporation, the city agency that handles all U.N. property, held a competition. It was open only to Pritzker Prize winners, and Japanese architect Fumihiko Maki was selected in 2004. Not long after, the project ran into political hurdles and was put on hold, but earlier this month Albany, the city and the U.N. reached a deal so the project can move forward. Almost as soon as the ink had dried on the land swap, Mr. Maki and his local partners, FXFowle, unrolled their blueprints and got back to work.”

The following was originally published in the September 2012 issue of the Architectural Record:

“The original design-team members were not oblivious to the problems associated with their orientation choice, however, Le Corbusier argued for an envelope solution that included external shading devices, such as the brise-soleil that had been installed on his 1933 Salvation Army project in Paris several years after its completion. Harrison, meanwhile, advocated the use of insulated glazing, a new technology consisting of two layers of glass with a sealed air space in between. The U.N. originally chose insulated glazing based on a cost study by the mechanical-engineering firm Syska Hennessy (which, coincidentally, is also the mechanical engineer for the U.N. renovation). The study showed that the new glazing technology would be less expensive and easier to maintain than the combination of conventional glazing and an external shading system. However, the insulated glass was also eventually eliminated from the specifications, not only due to its cost premium over single glazing but also because the layered glass was too heavy for the double-hung sashes. Its international design team notwithstanding, the Secretariat “fell victim to that uniquely American practice affectionately known as ‘value engineering,’ ” says Heintges.

Architecture Under Construction – One World Trade Center

Probably one of the most significant projects currently under construction is the new tower located at One WTC.  Apart from exemplifying that un-built Architecture (as one of my college professor put it) is merely masturbation which is part of the reason it was selected.  More importantly One WTC was picked because it shows how the forces of a people come together to construct a symbolic structure that radiates meaning to everyone who sees it.  Both as an object and as a place to be occupied One WTC, once completed, will serve as a symbol of the city it inhabits.

Gross square footage: 3,500,000 square feet
Total construction cost: $3.19 billion
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP

The following was originally published in the September 2011 issue of the Architectural Record:

There is no denying that One World Trade Center (WTC), the 104-story tower now rising at the northern end of the Ground Zero site, is a tremendously ambitious commercial real estate venture. The building, owned by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey with the developer Durst Organization holding a 10 percent stake, will contain 3.1 million square feet of office space when completed in late 2013. Below grade, connected to the WTC site’s vast underground transportation infrastructure, there will be 55,000 square feet of retail, and near the top, the tower will include a two-level observation deck and a restaurant. But when the designers of the $3.19 billion project describe the building, they generally focus first on its potential as a symbol: “It will serve as the marker of the 9/11 memorial on the skyline,” says David Childs, consulting design partner to Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM).

A Return to “Modern” – The Barnes Foundation

This “Retro” project is an example of how Architects study the Architecture that came before them and build on it accumulated knowledge.  All Architecture, no matter how innovating, stands on the shoulders of the ones who came before it.  In this example, the Architects draw clues from a few of the greats: Louis Kahn, Carlo Scarpa, and Edward Larrabee Barnes—masters of the late-Modern museum to create their very own masterpiece.

Completion Date: May 2012
Gross square footage: 93,000 GSF
Total Project cost: $150M
Architect: Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects

The following was originally published in the June 2012 issue of the Architectural Record:

“Taking cues from the designs of Louis Kahn, Carlo Scarpa, and Edward Larrabee Barnes—masters of the late-Modern museum—the new Barnes shows its architects (who are best known for their modestly sized, now closed American Folk Art Museum in New York City) working at a high level. Most impressive of all is the thoughtful sense of procession that carries visitors through the $150 million complex, first from the outside in and then from the museum’s airy common spaces almost inexorably toward the smaller-scaled galleries.”

Curvalicious Architecture – Heydar Aliyev Cultural Center

Love or hate ‘em—the Starkitects also define the direction of Architecture.  Ever since I first laid my eyes on Zaha’s sketches back in Architecture School I have been a sucker of her work.  The trends of post-modernism culled with a dash of the post-PM millennium design prevalent in Rem Koolhaus, Morphosis, Peter Eisenman, and Zaha Hadid’s work is one that will shape our landscape forever. This kind of design shows how Architects are able to reshape nature, albeit on a temporary basis, to alter the surfaces, forms, and materials that we are able to enjoy as we move through the spaces – inside and outside.

From Wiki:

The Heydar Aliyev Cultural Center is a cultural complex in BakuAzerbaijan, named after former president of Azerbaijan, Heydar Aliyev. The complex is designed by Iraqi-British architect Zaha Hadid

The Cultural Center houses a conference hall with three auditoriums, a library and a museum. The project is intended to play an integral role in the intellectual life of the city. Located close to the city center, the site plays a pivotal role in the redevelopment of Baku. The site neighbouring the Heydar Aliyev Cultural Center is designated for residential, offices, a hotel and commercial center, whilst the land between the Cultural Center and the city’s main thoroughfare will become the Cultural Plaza – an outdoor piazza for the Cultural Center as well as a welcoming space for the visitors.

The Heydar Aliyev Cultural Center represents a fluid form which emerges by the folding of the landscape’s natural topography and by the wrapping of individual functions of the Center. All functions of the Center, together with entrances, are represented by folds in a single continuous surface. This fluid form gives an opportunity to connect the various cultural spaces whilst, at the same time, providing each element of the Center with its own identity and privacy. As it folds inside, the skin erodes away to become an element of the interior landscape of the Cultural Center.

Heydar Aliyev Cultural Center had an official soft-opening ceremony on 10 May 2012 held by current president of Azerbaijan Ilham Aliyev. As of today, works on the interiors are still ongoing and the building is not open to the public yet.

Religious –   St. Nicholas Eastern Orthodox Church

Architecture, for me, is spiritual.  It is a divine connection between the creator, the occupant, and the spiritual world.  This simple church demonstrates how function can follow form.  It is simple and economically feasible for the patrons.  It is sleek and modern and addresses the needs of the client and the occupants.  The bright red cross offers a clear symbol indicating the use of the building.

Gross square footage: 3,600 sq.ft.
Cost: $405,000
Completion date: December 2009
Architect Marlon Blackwell Architect

The following was originally published in the November 2011 issue of the Architectural Record:

“The congregation couldn’t afford to build a brand new church. They may in about seven years, when the current mortgage is paid off and membership grows from 120 to a projected 200 parishioners. In the meantime, Jonathan Boelkins, project manager, says he and his team thought about tearing down the shed. “But it had structure and it had a roof, and so we thought, well, we’ll see what we can do with it,” he says. Boelkins and Blackwell wanted to give the building a presence from the road and, as Blackwell says, “give spirit form in the present.” They studied the history of Orthodox churches and found that their designs vary widely in the world: Each takes on a regional identity, rooted in its time, and St. Nicholas would be no different.

Blackwell and his team kept the roof, the structure, and the original skin on all but the western elevation and other, select areas. But they wrapped the building in new box-ribbed metal panels, keeping the western elevation white and the rest a dark bronze. “The panels are just exquisite,” says Blackwell. “They turn the building into corduroy.”

The shed’s long axis ran north-south, but the Orthodox like to pray facing east. The architects added a narrow addition to the western elevation to create the narthex. They moved the front entrance to the western elevation and marked the interior entry to the sanctuary with a steeple. Focus in the sanctuary is on the iconostasis in front of the altar, where Father John Atchison, parish priest, performs the rituals of the service under a slot window that allows morning light to filter in.”

Architecture as Sculpture – Wendy at MoMA PS1

All Architecture has the ability to function as art in some capacity.  In this case Architecture can be displayed, looked at, and occupied.  It is also important to think about Architecture as something that can transform, be put up, taken down, and reinstalled someplace else.  Various applications and variations on this theme exist. What is also exciting about this project is that the Architects gave this object a name, which makes the Architecture itself a personified character with it’s own personality.

The following was originally published on MoMA PS1’s website:

“The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 announce HWKN (Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner, New York) as the winner of th annual Young Architects Program (YAP) in New York. Now in its 13th edition, the Young Architects Program at MoMA and MoMA PS1 has been committed to offering emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary, outdoor installation at MoMA PS1 that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling. HWKN, drawn from among five finalists, will design a temporary urban landscape for the 2012 Warm Up summer music series in MoMA PS1’s outdoor courtyard.”

Architecture Fun – Playing with Barcodes

Architecture can be playful.  There are many examples of this throughout history.  This project incorporates emerging technology with playfulness.

The following was originally published by the Curators of the Russian Pavilion by Sergei Tchoban and Sergey Kuznetsov of SPEECH Tchoban & Kuznetsov

“Every surface inside the top floor of the Russian Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale is covered in QR codes, which visitors decode using tablet computers to explore ideas for a new Russian city dedicated to science.

In our pavilion we have tried to find an architecture metaphor for connecting the real and the virtual. People today live at the intersection of on- and off-line; ‘our common ground’ is becoming a cipher for infinite mental spaces.”

Transportation Architecture – Kaohsiung Port and Cruise Service Center

Architecture plays an important role as a connector.  One example where Architecture engages a site and its occupants is this waterfront terminal. The building’s occupants are surrounded by fluid forms, shapes and materials.

The following was originally published on ArchDaily’s website on December 14, 2010:

“Check out Reiser + Umemoto’s latest win for the Kaohsiung Port and Cruise Service Center in southern Taiwan. Working with Taipei-based Fei and Cheng and Associates, New York-based Ysrael A. Seinuk, PC and Hong-Kong based Arup, the new development exploits its waterfront placement as tumbling organic wave-like volumes cascade out toward the waves.

The port terminal is an experiment of “dynamic 3-dimensional urbanism” which amplifies the flow of pedestrian traffic through an elevated and activated boardwalk which runs continuously along the water. Meanwhile, beneath this level of public promenade, cruise and ferry functions are located just below. In this way, the layers create a dense range of programs, yet separating the cruises and ferries help maintain secure areas for departing/arriving passengers.

Structurally, the building’s skin is a system of nested, long-span shells.  The shells are composed of an underlying steel pipe space frame which is sandwiched by cladding panels to create a useable cavity space. “Overall an experience of directed yet funactionally separated flows will lend an aura of energy to the point terminal space,” explained the architects.

The project is scheduled for construction in 2012 and expected to be in operation by 2014, with a construction budget of approximately $85,000,000 USD. The competition is sponsored by the Kaohsiung Harbor Bureau, Ministry of Transportation and Communications, Taiwan, ROC.”

Architecture as Public Space

We look to Architecture for meaning.  On this project an Artist and Architect team up to create this fantastic object in the landscape.  Architecture can exist without a roof or walls.

Completion Date: June 2012

Artist: James Turrell

Technical Architect:
Thomas Phifer and Partners
180 Varick Street, 11th Floor
New York, NY 10014

The following was originally published in the July 2012 issue of the Architectural Record:

Anchoring the western end of Rice University’s main quad in Houston, James Turrell’s new 118-foot-square Skyspace emerges from the earth (or lands from the heavens, depending on how you see it) in front of the monolithic Shepherd School of Music. “This is architecture that light and space makes,” explains the artist. When the sun illuminates the atmosphere, you can’t see through it to view the stars that are there, he points out. “Light not only reveals, it also obscures—so you can actually build a space with it. I use light and architecture in that way: to limit space and to reveal it, either way.”

Turrell started his series of Skyspaces—enclosed rooms with an aperture open to the sky—in the 1970s, and to date he has created 73 across the world. In the early days, he would often make his works by cutting through existing buildings, such as his Meeting at New York’s MoMA PS1. But, to avoid irritating architects, as he says (and perhaps being irritated by them as well), he graduated to creating autonomous structures: buildings with holes designed in them, and no real function, much like a folly or gazebo.

Dubbed Twilight Epiphany, Turrell’s piece at Rice is composed of a 12-foot-8-inch-high grass berm that rises against the backdrop of the campus’s neo-Byzantine brick academic quads. The truncated pyramid form, which employs a concrete structure below and steel columns above, is topped with a 72-foot-square conventional membrane roof with a steel-plate knife-edge and a 14-foot-square aperture at its center. A lower-level seating area accommodates 44 people and features the artist’s trademark benches, made of Texas pink granite. Precast-concrete seating for 76 occupies the upper viewing area, where LEDs are installed for the two daily light shows programmed to correspond with sunrise and sunset. Made possible by a gift from Rice trustee and alumna Suzanne Deal Booth, who suggested the university work with Turrell, the Skyspace is the artist’s first engineered for sound (he worked with the music school to develop the concept), and it will host a variety of performances, some specially created for the space.

“We took James’s drawings and we turned them into something,” says Phifer, who has worked with numerous artists over the years and was happy to add Turrell to the roster. Not surprisingly, Turrell was very particular about the dimensions and scale of the room, the height the roof rose above the berm, the exact size of the opening, and the precision of the knife-edge, says the architect. “All of those details he’s been doing for most of his life—it’s a huge part of this work. The result is hypnotic. You’re taken to another place.”

“Though my work may not inform architecture, it can inform an architect about how we perceive,” says Turrell. “My interest is working in this space that we inhabit, which is not always the physical space that we have built.”

During the day, Twilight Epiphany gleams, a beautiful object offering an intriguing pause against the columned facade of the aggressively Postmodern Ricardo Bofill music school. As night falls, the colors projected on the levitating white canopy shift in juxtaposition to those in the sky. The frame brings passing objects into surreal focus—a cloud, a plane, a bug—and the walls dissipate, leaving you to consider the multitude of possibilities beyond.

The Architecture of Giving – Designing With a Purpose

Last but not least is this place holder for the Architecture of giving.  There are so many exciting and interesting projects taking place around the world around us.  Architects (like Doctors Without Borders) give back to the communities they serve and the global community.  After disasters Architects and their counterparts (Engineers, designers, contractors, etc), help in the cleanup and rebuilding process.  It is important to remember that all these projects make a difference in the lives of the people that they impact.  Although they do not always wind up in a book or magazine, these projects are still examples of what it means to be a great Architect by providing design expertise in adverse conditions.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Antony Gormley’s Mind-bending Scupltures via @TEDTalks

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In his talk, Gormley gives the insight behind his works Rearranged Desert and Learning to See. He also gives a peek at his work Blind Light, where he used light and water vapors as materials to create something of a cloud. The piece is meant to be an experience, and observers are invited to stroll through it.

Click here to read the rest of the story.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Exclusive Interview: Meet Architect Arnie Untoria of @USA_Architects

I LOVE MY ARCHITECT is happy to interview Architect
Arnie Untoria, principal of USA Architects.

I once introduced Arnie as “my second favorite Architect” where he retorted, “who is your first, Frank Cunha?” Of course, I responded “Yes!”

Alhambra Palace, Spain

1) When and why did you decide to become an Architect?

Always had an inclination but not until my freshman year at JSSC when I met my cousins boyfriend that was attending Pratt, that kidding around I ask him for an application, which he took serious, that I transferred and began studies.

2) What were some of the challenges of achieving your dream?

Well, I always wanted to be my own boss, therefore I did achieved my dream, I had no idea it was going to be a combination of dream and nightmare (haha).

3) Any memorable clients or project highlights?

Many thru the years, my Beth projects: Warren Developmental Center, it was a gem of design.
My favorite client: Elizabeth Board of Ed, they are friendly, knowledgeable and practical.

4) How do you balance design with your family life?

My wife has been fighting cancer for over 3 year, how do I balance? Adrenaline and necessity.

5) How does your family support what you do?

My wife loves the idea of me being an architect, my kids brag about local projects we have completed. It’s good.

6) How do Architects measure success?

I cannot speak for all, but I measure success by three simple things, quality of design, relationship with the client and getting paid!

7) What matters most to you in design?

That the objective is accomplish to my and the client’s satisfaction.

8) What are the challenges you face realizing your vision?

Most of the time comes down to money, enough fee? Client’s realistic expectation and things like that.

9) How do you translate the clients vision to meet your own design expectations?

That is easy, is what architecture is all about, I try to put myself in the clients/ user shoes and learn as much as possible about the way the building should work and look, if I’m happy with it, 99% of the time the client will also be happy.

10) What do you hope to achieve over the next 20-30 years?

I’m 57 therefore in architecture I may have another dozen and then I will like to slow down and just be a mentor or an advisor to my peers.

11) Who is your favorite Architect? Why?

Portman because of his business ability and Sullivan because of HS design ability.

12) What is your favorite historic and modern project? Why?

Alhambra Palace in Granada  Spain, it fascinates me what degree of civilization was achieved while Europe was in the dark ages. Modern? Not a big fan of any, architecture has lost a lot of its art.

13) Where do you see the profession going over the next few decades?

Unless we can have a big change in another direction, architecture, at least in the States, have been going down in quality and respect for decades now and I see no end in sight.

14) Who / what has been your greatest influence in design?

I cannot point to any particular architect or project but I am partial to the philosophy that form follows function.

15) Which building type would you like to work on that you haven’t been part of yet?

A Hospital, it is a very complicated building type. Having spent so much time in hospitals since my wife’s illness, I am fascinated by its complications.

16) How do you hope to inspire / mentor the next generation of Architects?

Not sure, in a way I’m already doing it with the younger generation in my office but not realizing the details.

17) What does Architecture mean to you?

It is my life for almost 40 years, I don’t know anything else.

18) What is your design process?

Listen to the client, educate the client and then try as best I can to translate the realities of the client’s dream into an affordable building solution.

19) If you could not be an Architect, what would you be?

A baseball player, hence way I’m an architect!

20) What is your dream project?

To be able to design some type of relevant project in my native Cuba one day.

Check out Arnie / USA Architects on the WebTwitter, and Facebook.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.

We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post, please share it with friends.

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Sophia is Fine (Art) – @SophiaFine

I wanted to share one of my dearest Twitter supporters and friends, Sophia Fine who is a Fine Arts graduate.  She successfully completed her independent studies in Florence, Italy and was recognized and awarded for her contributions to Literature and Drama. Now she is well-respected in the art-community and is involved in various art shows, solo expositions, and selling her original artwork both in America and overseas.  Click here for more on Sophia and how to contact her online if you are interested in her artwork.

Can You tell us about Your Process.

I came from a Beautiful World, which presented itself to me early in life. Art was always within me, in so many ways, in everything I saw and touched. I feel like a creator of Expressive Beautiful things, as if God Touched me.

Creativity! Yes! Art is a great Gift! I aim to transform my visions and feelings into my Art.

I create happiness. I can’t wait to go to my studio, express myself, and make things happen. Sometimes I pour the Colors on an Empty Canvas and before me I see all the things I had in my mind.

I like to create themes, with enchanted realities, dream-like, and with absurd beauty. But never losing the soul communication with the viewer when jostling together colorful compositions that are as jolly as kitsch Postcards from Heaven!

I like to immerse the viewer in the false immobility of life’s turbulence and to render the animated presence of Joy!

Everyone has a space within them that waits to be filled with new, yet unknown excitement.

Read the rest of this entry »


Barbara Fariña @Babfari Expose – Promo Queen

Today’s Follow Friday Feature….

One of my favorite people to follow on social media is Barbara Fariña from Argentina.  She is a fantastic promoter and loyal fan.

If you don’t know her yet, you should….Maybe she will even help you build your followers on Twitter, Facebook, etc…

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Featured above are some of Barbara’s favorite artists.

1) When did you first get started on social media?

I don´t know really.  What I do know is that it all started with Facebook for sure.

2) How has it changed your life?

Very much. When you understand Social Media, you realize there is another way to seeing and conceiving communication.
And different ways to do it! 

3) What are your favorite top 3 sites?  Name a few others you like.

Every day there are new sites. Some of them you don´t even know for what were created.
But I guess my top 3 are: Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest. ( I use a lot google +and  youtoube) and one thing is important to say for us, if you don´t have a smartphone stay at home.

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