GREEN LINKS

    1. 13 Examples of Green Architecture
    2. Materiality and Green Architecture: The Effect of Building Materials on Sustainability and Design
    3. Green Glass at Corning Museum
    4. @babfari Recognized for Green Architecture and Design
    5. 10 Simple Steps To Living Green Tips
    6. Who or What is the US Green Building Council
    7. Why Is Green Design and Construction Important?
    8. High Performance Building Design
    9. Passive Temperature Control and Other Sustainable Design Elements to Consider
    10. You Know LEED, But Do You Know WELL?
    11. Creating High Performance Buildings through Integrative Design Process
    12. Awesome LEED Project in NJ ::: “CENTRA” by @KohnPedersenFox
    13. Contemporary Mediterranean Home With a “Breathing” Eco-Façade
    14. What is a High Performance School?
    15. Exclusive #EcoMonday Interview with Architect Bill Reed with host @FrankCunhaIII (Part 1 of 3)
    16. Exclusive #EcoMonday Interview with Architect Bill Reed with host @FrankCunhaIII (Part 2 of 3)
    17. Exclusive #EcoMonday Interview with Architect Bill Reed with host @FrankCunhaIII (Part 3 of 3)
    18. Team New Jersey To Make Precast Concrete Solar House Reality and @RutgersU and @NJIT Compete in 2012 Solar Decathlon
    19. The 2030 Challenge for Planning @Arch2030
    20. What is The 2030 Challenge? @Arch2030
    21. Sustainable Cities
    22. Cool Concrete Home in Jersey City

    We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

    Sincerely,

    FRANK CUNHA III
    I Love My Architect – Facebook


    Glossary of Green Terminologies

    The following is a quick reference guide to get you started understanding the jargon associated with green design and construction. We hope you find it useful.

    1,000 ppm

    One thousandth parts per million is the minimum disclosure threshold. Manufacturer measures and discloses all intentionally added ingredients and residuals that exist in the product at 1000 ppm (0.1%) or greater. These may  trigger a GreenScreen Benchmark (BM-1 or LT-1) or Possible Benchmark 1 (BM-P1 or LT-P1).

    10,000 ppm (As per MSDS)

    Manufacturer discloses all intentionally added ingredients and residuals that exist in a product. This is the threshold that is required by current MSDS standards

    100 ppm

    One hundred parts per million is the ideal disclosure threshold. Manufacturer measures and discloses all intentionally added ingredients and residuals that exist in the product at 100 ppm (0.01%) or greater. These may trigger a GreenScreen Benchmark (BM-1 or LT-1) or Possible Benchmark 1 (BM-P1 or LT-P1).

    Accessory Materials

    Used for the installation, maintenance , cleaning and operations materials; including materials recommended by warranty. For example, if a carpet requires a specific type of adhesive. The adhesive would be the accessory materials.

    Assessment

    the evaluation of the toxicological properties (hazards) of chemicals; evaluates exposure and risk assessment in relation to both environmental and human health scenarios.

    Associated Hazard

    disclosure of the health hazards associated with each ingredient; Portico uses a minimum set of authoritative chemical hazard lists against which ingredients are screened for human health and environmental hazards.

    Asthmagen

    Asthmagens are substances that are known to cause or exacerbate asthma. Asthma is a complex disease, and there is not enough evidence to point to any single cause. Public health agencies often report dust, pet dander, environmental air pollution, tobacco smoke, respiratory infections, mold, exercise, and stress as common triggers of asthma attacks.

    Health organizations have also identified a number chemical asthmagens, including many that are commonly used in building materials, such as floorings, insulations and cabinet substrates. These chemicals include: formaldehyde, toluene, styrene, BPA and certain phthalate plasticizers.

    Despite better management of asthma through medication, improved outdoor air quality and a dramatic decline in tobacco smoking, the incidence of asthma has continued to rise, especially in children — and in particular among children who are living in poverty.

    Authoritative chemical hazard lists

    a list of chemicals and their association to human health or environmental hazards. These lists are created by an expert assessment of scientific evidence by a recognized authoritative body.

    Biobased

    “Biobased” is a term used in the marketing materials of many types of products. While biobased technically describes a product made from a living material (soybean oil, wool, etc.) marketing materials may stretch this definition to include minerals or other naturally occurring materials that aren’t renewable, or suggest that an entire product is made of biobased materials, when in fact only a small percentage of the product is.

    Blowing Agent

    A class of chemicals that can generate foam in materials, such as those used in insulation, which later harden or solidify into long-lasting structures. Many are known to possess extremely high global warming potential; chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been mostly eliminated from new production since the 2000s, but hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are still prevalent. Blowing agents, as a class of products used in building product manufacture, are in an active transition toward healthier and more environmentally friendly options.

    CAS Number

    chemical abstract service number is a unique numerical identifier for every chemical described in open scientific literature of elements, chemical compounds, polymers and other substances.

    Carcinogen/Cancer

    Can cause or contribute to the development of cancer.

    Characterization

    identification and disclosure of ingredients and all hazards associated with ingredient components in the product/material formulation.

    Common Product Profile

    A profile of a generic, non-manufacturer-specific product type that contains: a brief description of the product type, the expected composition of the product based on publicly available sources, and corresponding health hazards inherent to this composition. Common Product Profiles (CPs) developed as part of the Quartz Project include additional information about the life cycle of the product, such as its contribution to global warming. See http://www.quartzproject.org/ for more information on CPs.

    Developmental Toxicant

    Can cause harm to a developing child, including birth defects, low birth weight, and biological or behavioral problems that appear as the child grows.

    Disclosure Threshold

    the level at which all intentionally added ingredients and residuals in the product/material formulation are disclosed (1,000 ppm, 100 ppm, or other). Different standards require specific disclosure threshold. MSDS (Materials Safety Data Sheets require minimum of 10,000ppm.

    Endocrine/Hormone Disruptor

    Can interfere with hormone communication between cells which controls metabolism, development, growth, reproduction, and behavior (the endocrine system). Linked to health effects such as obesity, diabetes, male reproductive disorders, and altered brain development.

    Environmental Attributes

    this information can be found in an EPD, LCA, or other studies of global warming impact, carbon content, and embodied energy. We recommend providing this information (when available) because it will be helpful for LEED and LBC regional credit documentation and carbon accounting.

    Flame Retardants

    Flame retardants are chemical additives to building products that reduce their flammability. They are commonly found in textiles, plastics, coatings, finishes and foams. Halogenated flame retardants – those made with chlorine or bromine – are particularly toxic to human health, and the planet.

    Flue-Gas Desulfurization (FGD)

    Flue-gas desulfurization is an environmental control technology installed in the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants designed to remove pollutants from the air. These controls are also called “scrubbers”. Once the scrubbers are full of sulfur dioxide, they are often used to create synthetic gypsum. FGD gypsum can be used in drywall, but also in concrete and other applications where mined gypsum can be used. FGD can contain heavy metals such as mercury that can be released into the air when it is incorporated into these products.

    Formaldehyde

    Formaldehyde is a colorless gas used as a preservative and disinfectant in the building industry, and in the manufacture of polymers. Formaldehyde is carcinogenic, irritates the eyes, nose, and lungs, and is known to react with other atmospheric chemicals to produce the deadly gas carbon monoxide. Formaldehyde is used in some paints and adhesives, in some fabric treatments, and, significantly, in the manufacture of polymeric binding resins used in a wide variety of building products. Phenol formaldehyde, urea formaldehyde, and melamine formaldehyde are all known to release formaldehyde over time long after product installation in residential and commercial spaces.

    Global Warming

    Can absorb thermal radiation, increasing the temperature of the atmosphere and contributing to climate change.

    Global Warming Potential (GWP)

    Known as “greenhouse gasses,” certain gasses have the ability to warm the earth by absorbing heat from the sun and trapping it the atmosphere. Global Warming Potential is a tool that allows scientists to compare the severity of greenhouse gasses based on how much heat they can trap, and how long they remain in the atmosphere. By using carbon dioxide for each comparison, a larger GWP number, the more a gas warms the earth, and contributes to climate change.

    Look for GWP data on Environmental Product Declarations, and learn more about interpreting these numbers at http://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/understanding-global-warming-potentials.

    GreenScreen

    short for “GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals”, a chemical disclosure and assessment standard  developed by Clean Production Action to rank chemicals along a four point scale between the most toxic chemicals and the most benign to guide substitution efforts.

    HPD

    also known as Health Product Declaration. It is a standardized format that allows manufacturers to share contents of their products, including any hazardous chemicals.

    HPD-1

    status marked for products that have a Health Product Declaration with full ingredient and hazard listings and a hazard translator with a disclosure threshold of 1000 or 100 ppm; can contain LT-1 scored components

    HPD-2

    status marked for products that have a Health Product Declaration with full ingredient and hazard listings and a hazard translator with a disclosure threshold of 1000 or 100 ppm; can NOT contain LT-1 scored components

    HPD-Partial

    status marked for products that have a Partial Health Product Declaration and have characterization of hazards and hazard translator for ingredients; exceptions are acceptable with a disclosure threshold of 1000 ppm

    Hazard

    Hazard is an intrinsic property of a substance – its potential to harm humans or some part of the environment based on its physical structure and properties. We can assess the hazard of a chemical or material by reviewing the scientific evidence for the specific kinds of harm that a substance can cause (often called the endpoints), such as damage to the human reproductive system, or the onset of asthma. On HomeFree, hazards are displayed with a color indicating the level of concern for each one. Purple is the highest level of concern, followed by red, and then orange.

    Because very few products on the market are made with ingredients that have no hazards, you should expect to see hazards called out, even for products that are considered healthier options. The trick is to compare hazards between products, and whenever possible, prefer the product with fewer hazards.

    Health Endpoint

    A disease symptom or related marker of a health impact on a human or other organism. Examples of human health endpoints include carcinogenicity (causes cancer), reproductive and developmental toxicity, respiratory sensitization, etc. Health endpoints are due to the inherent hazards of a substance, and are determined by authoritative bodies, such as the US EPA or the National Institutes of Health.

    Information Request Sent

    this means that an email letter has been sent to the manufacturer requesting information about a specific product. This IR may ask the manufacturer to share HPD type data, a GreenScreen Assessment, or a C2C certification in order to meet Google’s Healthy Materials criteria

    Intentional Content

    each discrete chemical, polymer, metal, bio-based material, or other substance added to the product by the manufacturer or supplier that exists in the product as delivered for final use requires its own line entry and must account for over 99% of the total product. To add content you may enter it by using a CAS registry number, chemical name, abbreviations, common/ trade names, genus/species (for biobased materials), product or manufacturer name (for components)

    Inventory

    list of product contents, ingredients

    Lifecycle

    In biology, the term “lifecycle” describes the arc an organism undergoes from birth, through stages of growth and development, to its death. When applied to building products, “lifecycle”describes the arc that chemicals or materials take from the extraction of the raw materials needed for their creation, through their synthesis and inclusion in a building product, the period of time that the product is installed in a building, its eventual removal from the building, and its disposal/reuse/recycling at the end of its useful life. Products (and the chemicals and materials used to make them) often present human and environmental health hazards at any step in this lifecycle.

    Material Health

    listing the ingredients and present chemical hazards of a product and optimizing towards safer materials

    Mutagen

    Can cause or increase the rate of mutations, which are changes in the genetic material in cells. This can result in cancer and birth defects.

    Optimization

    the absence of any “chemicals of concern” in the product/material formulation.

    Ozone Depletion

    Can contribute to chemical reactions that destroy ozone in the earth’s upper atmosphere.

    PBTs

    Persistent, Bio-accumulative Toxicants; these are chemicals that are toxic, persist in the environment, bioaccumulate in the food chains, and consequently pose risks to the human health and environment

    Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxicant (PBT)

    Does not break down readily from natural processes, accumulates in organisms, concentrating as it moves up the food chain, and is harmful in small quantities.

    Portico

    formerly known as the Healthy Materials Tool; is a new portal for entering and accessing building  product data. Portico is a database that allows project teams unparalleled access to a vast selection of building products. Portico automatically screens manufacturer product information so that products are available in front of Google’s design teams right away.

    Predicted from Process Chemistry

    Fully disclosed projected residuals based on process chemistry. This option is suggested for manufacturers without the capability of measuring actual residuals. Indicate the tool or other basis for prediction in the Disclosure Notes. The HBN Pharos tool is an example of a tool that predicts potential residuals.

    Publish

    share HPD information solely to Google, not to general public. If public, please share public URL in the transparency section

    Reproductive Toxicant

    Can disrupt the male or female reproductive systems, changing sexual development, behavior or functions, decreasing fertility, or resulting in loss of a fetus during pregnancy.

    Residual Content

    the by-product of a reaction of two or more chemicals that are used in the manufacturing process; known as trace substances remaining in the product from manufacturing steps (such as monomers and catalysts) or contaminants that come with raw materials. Residuals can be known from testing as well as estimated from process chemistry assessment. Predicted from Process Chemistry definition noted above.

    Respiratory Sensitization/Asthmagen

    Can result in high sensitivity such that small quantities trigger asthma, rhinitis, or other allergic reactions in the respiratory system. This can can exacerbate current asthma as well as cause the disease of asthma.

    Screening

    review contents against authoritative chemical hazard lists. Health Product Declaration standard uses screening as a pathway to understand and assess products for any human health hazard endpoints.

    Self-declared

    a product disclosure and screening/assessment which is created “in-house” by the manufacturer of the product, and does not utilize a third party assessor.

    Third Party Assessor

    an independent assessment body which is not affiliated with the manufacturer or the product.

    Tint

    Tints are a mix of pigments and other ingredients that give paints their distinct color. These tints can be a substantial source of VOC content in addition to whatever VOCs are in the paint itself. Darker and richer colors will tend to be higher in VOC content. Some manufacturers have developed low or zero VOC tint lines that can be used to insure that a low VOC paint product remains so even in dark or rich colors.

    Transparency

    the level of product/material formulation information (including ingredients names and associated hazards) being shared by the manufacturer with the end users (i.e. public, third party, Google).  Portico’s transparency category gives points to manufacturers who share product information (HPD) publicly rather than just to Google.

    VOC

    Volatile Organic Compound

    VOC Content

    provide the regulatory VOC content  for liquid/wet applied product in g/L; if the VOC content has not been third party certified and there is no standard for the product, indicate “none” on the VOC content line. If the product is not wet applied, indicate N/A

    VOC Emission

    emissions testing and certification for any product for which the current version of the CDPH (CA Department of Public Health) Standard Method provides emission scenarios

    VOCs

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) means any compound of carbon (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides or carbonates, and ammonium carbonate), which react in the atmosphere in the presence of sunlight.

    Verification

    assessments verified by an independent, third party assessor, in compliance with specific requirements pertaining to the standard at hand.

    Zero VOC

    5 g/L cutoff threshold recognized by SCAQMD for products that are Zero VOC

    ppm

    parts per million (1,000 ppm = 0.1%; 100 ppm = 0.01%).

    (Source: https://homefree.healthybuilding.net/glossary)

    We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

    Sincerely,

    FRANK CUNHA III
    I Love My Architect – Facebook


    Green Specification Guidance

    GENERAL

    ● Include a requirement in specifications that contractors and subs review HomeFree.

    ● Ask for and prefer products that have a Health Product Declaration (HPD).

    ● Avoid products marketed as antimicrobial and claiming or implying a health benefit.

    FLOORING

    ● Prefer non-vinyl flooring products.

    ● When vinyl is used: Specify phthalate-free; avoid post-consumer recycled content.

    ● For rubber flooring: Avoid post-consumer recycled content (crumb rubber).

    ● For carpets: Look for products that don’t use fluorinated stain-repellent treatments; specify backings that are vinyl-free and polyurethane-free and do not contain fly ash.

    ● For ceramic tiles, prefer those made in the USA where most manufacturers have eliminated toxic lead compounds from ceramic tile glazes. Avoid post-consumer recycled content from CRTs (cathode ray tubes) which contain high concentrations of lead.

    INTERIOR PAINT

    ● Prefer paints that meet the Green Seal-11 (GS-11) standard from 2010 or later whenever possible or specify paints known to be free of alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs).

    ● Specify bases with 10 g/L of VOCs or less and colorants that do not increase the overall VOC content.

    ● At a minimum, specify paint bases and colorants with a VOC content of 50g/L or less.

    ● Look for paints that have VOC emission testing and meet the requirements of the CDPH (California Department of Public Health) Standard Method for Testing VOC Emissions (01350).

    DRYWALL

    ● Specify boards made with natural gypsum.

    ● If possible, avoid pre-consumer recycled content (also known as synthetic gypsum or FGD) to avoid the release of mercury in manufacture.

    THERMAL INSULATION

    ● Specify residential fiber glass batt insulation — it has been reformulated to be free of formaldehyde — or formaldehyde-free mineral wool batts. Unfaced batts are most preferable.

    ● For blown insulation, prefer cellulose or un-bonded fiber glass.

    ● Consider alternatives to rigid board insulation whenever possible. If board insulation is required, specify mineral wool boards and look for those that meet the requirements of CDPH Standard Method for Testing VOC Emissions (01350) for residential scenarios. If plastic foam insulation is used, look for those that are halogen-free. Consider upgrading to expanded cork insulation.

    ● Avoid spray polyurethane foam (SPF) insulation whenever possible.

    ● For sealing applications, prefer caulking or sealant tapes to spray foams.

    COUNTERTOPS

    ● Think of countertops as a system of products: the surface itself, an adhesive, and potentially a surface treatment, which may need to be re-applied regularly. Each of these elements have different health concerns.

    ● Sealant products can introduce hazardous chemicals. Specify countertops that do not need to be sealed after installation, such as engineered stone, cultured marble, or solid surfacing.

    ● Plastic laminate is not a top countertop choice, but if used, specify that the substrate be made with NAF (No Added Formaldehyde) or ULEF (Ultra Low Emitting Formaldehyde) resins. © Healthy Building Network [June 2018]

    CABINETRY & MILLWORK ​+​ DOORS

    ● Prefer solid wood products over composite.

    ● When using composite wood, specify materials that are NAF (No Added Formaldehyde) or ULEF (Ultra Low Emitting Formaldehyde) whenever possible.

    ● Prefer products that are factory-finished.

    ● For edge-banding, specify products with veneer rather than vinyl.

    (Source: https://homefree.healthybuilding.net)

    We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

    Sincerely,

    FRANK CUNHA III
    I Love My Architect – Facebook


    #EcoMonday Contemporary Mediterranean Home With a “Breathing” Eco-Façade

    Breathing House 14

    Excerpt from “Freshhomes Design & Architecture”: Travessa de Patrocinio is one of those bohemian places in Lisbon that require a sweet disposition while visiting. The unique collaboration between these three designers, Luís Rebelo de AndradeTiago Rebelo de Andrade and Manuel Cachão Tojal, gave birth to a project inspired by minimalism, with an interesting Mediterranean “coverage”. Imagine a thick “coat” of plants shadowing the entire façade of a house that spreads vertically. “Its walls are completely covered with vegetation, creating a vertical garden, filled with around 4500 plants from 25 different Iberian and Mediterranean varieties which occupies 100 square meters. So, short levels of water consumption are guaranteed as well as little gardening challenges.”  Click here to read the rest of the story.

    Breathing House 00

    Breathing House 0

    Excerpt from Architizer News: The House in Travessa do Patrocínio by RA\\ ( Luís Rebelo de Andrade, Tiago Rebelo de Andrade, Manuel Cachão Tojal) does just that. The narrow townhouse is situated smack dab in Lisbon, in a neighborhood with little access to green spaces. To compensate for this lack, the architects draped the house with lush green facades that cover 100 square-meters of wall space. But this isn’t your run-of-the-mill green building accessory. The facades are integral components to the architecture, not just tacked on for a higher LEED score. They’re planted with approximately 4,500 plants sourced from 25 different local varieties, which  all require little maintenance. The result is a vertical garden that the architects say functions as an urban “lung” within the pavement-heavy area, helping to rid the residential street of excess noise, carbon, and other pollutants floating about. Click here to read the rest of the story.
    Breathing House 13

    Breathing House 16 Breathing House 15 Breathing House 13 Breathing House 12 Breathing House 11 Breathing House 10 Breathing House 09 Breathing House 08 Breathing House 07    Breathing House 03 Breathing House 02 Breathing House 01

    A Brief History of Green Walls

    The concept of green walls is an ancient one, with examples in architectural history
    reaching back to the Babylonians – with the famous Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one
    of the seven ancient wonders of the world. Highlights of the history of green walls are
    provided below:

    • 3rd C. BCE to 17th C. AD: Throughout the Mediterranean, Romans train grape vines (Vitis species) on garden trellises and on villa walls. Manors and castles with climbing roses are symbols of secret gardens.
    • 1920s: The British and North American garden city movement promote the integration of house and garden through features such as pergolas, trellis structures and self-clinging climbing plants.
    • 1988: Introduction of a stainless steel cable system for green facades.
    • Early 1990s: Cable and wire-rope net systems and modular trellis panel systems enter the North American marketplace.
    • 1993: First major application of a trellis panel system at Universal CityWalk in California.
    • 1994: Indoor living wall with bio-filtration system installed in Canada Life Building in Toronto, Canada.
    • 2002: The MFO Park, a multi-tiered 300’ long and 50’ high park structure opened in Zurich, Switzerland. The project featured over 1,300 climbing plants.
    • 2005: The Japanese federal government sponsored a massive Bio Lung exhibit, the centerpiece of Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan. The wall is comprised of 30 different modular green wall systems available in Japan.
    • 2007: Seattle implements the Green Factor, which includes green walls.
    • 2007: GRHC launches full day Green Wall Design 101 course; the first on the subject in North America.
    • 2008: GRHC launches Green Wall Award of Excellence and Green Wall Research Fund.

    Source: GreenScreen

    Biofiltration

    An ‘active’ living wall is intended to be integrated into a building’s infrastructure and designed to biofilter indoor air and provide thermal regulation. It is a hydroponic system fed by nutrient rich water which is re-circulated from a manifold, located at the top of the wall, and collected in a gutter at the bottom of the fabric wall system. Plant roots are sandwiched between two layers of synthetic fabric that support microbes and a dense root mass. These root microbes remove airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs), while foliage absorbs carbon monoxide and dioxide. The plants’ natural processes produce cool fresh air that is drawn through the system by a fan and then distributed throughout the building. A variation of this concept could be applied to green facade systems as well, and there is potential to apply a hybrid of systems at a large scale.

    Source: GreenScreen

    Public Benefits of Green Walls

    Breathing House 101b

    Source: GreenScreen

    Private Benefits of Green Walls

    Breathing House 101a

    Source: GreenScreen

    Also Check Out:

    We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

    If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

    Sincerely,
    Frank Cunha III
    I Love My Architect – Facebook

    FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
    P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
    e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
    mobile: 201.681.3551
    direct: 973.970.3551
    fax: 973.718.4641
    web: http://fc3arch.com
    Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


    What is the Eden Project?

    The Eden Project — The world’s largest man-made complex of greenhouses in Cornwall, United Kingdom, inspired by Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome design.

    The world’s largest man-made complex of greenhouses in Cornwall, United Kingdom.

    Total surface  39.540 m2
    Total steel  weight 700 tons
    Total length  off all beams 36000 m
    Steel weight per surface less than 24 kg/m2
    Biggest hexagon area 80 m2 at a span of 11 m
    Biggest dome diameter (dome B) 125 m
    Column free area 15590 m2 WTB and 6540 m2 for HTB

    Official website: Click Here 

    Grimshaw Architects’ Site: Click Here

    Video (bottom of webpage): Click Here

    The Eden Project is a visitor attraction in Cornwall in the United Kingdom, including the world’s largest greenhouse.  Inside the artificial biomes are plants that are collected from all around the world. The project is located in a reclaimed Kaolinite pit, located 1.25 mi (2 kilometres) from the town of St Blazey and 5 kilometres (3 mi) from the larger town of St AustellCornwall.

    The complex is dominated by two huge enclosures consisting of adjoining domes that house thousands of plant species, and each enclosure emulates a naturalbiome. The domes consist of hundreds of hexagonal and pentagonal, inflated, plastic cells supported by steel frames. The first dome emulates a tropicalenvironment, and the second a Mediterranean environment.

    This slideshow requires JavaScript.

    If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

    Sincerely,
    Frank Cunha III
    I Love My Architect – Facebook

    FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
    P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
    e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
    mobile: 201.681.3551
    direct: 973.970.3551
    fax: 973.718.4641
    web: http://fc3arch.com
    Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


    Green Glass at Corning Museum

    DSC_0002_MV_CNMVOHKWJXFE_cvppq6a4sedq DSC_0021_MV_GWYWIWYONJMI_yhmceocyxseh DSC_0045_MV_JUSCMHDIXUZZ_ptzsnas6bw8h DSC_0048_MV_VKZDNILBCSXM_cf91jvrkljb9 DSC_0059_MV_KRLACPVHRMSA_gxoe7n0i1ecq

    The New York City practice Thomas Phifer and Partners have unveiled their design for the new 100,000 square foot North Wing expansion at the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, New York. The state of the art, “energy smart” building will provide the ideal interior environment for preserving the Museum’s unparalleled collection of glass art through natural lighting, an intelligent building envelope and sophisticated temperature and air quality controls. The $64 million North Wing is scheduled for completion in 2014.

    Included in the expansion will be a 26,000 square feet of gallery space. This is the largest space anywhere dedicated to the presentation of contemporary art in glass.

    Environmentally Sustainable Design Elements:

    • Insulated double glazed windows with high performance, low-E coating to reduce heat gain
    • Daytime illumination provided by natural light
    • Daylight harvesting system
    • Carbon dioxide monitors control volume of outside air intake
    • Enthalpy wheel recovers heat from building exhaust
    • VAV controls track occupancy and system performance to reduce energy consumption
    • Water economizer uses cooling towers instead of chillers to produce cooling in winter for pumps
    • Multiple valves on cooling coils reduce energy required for dehumidification
    • Commissioning of building systems maximizes equipment efficiency
    • Facility personnel training improves long-term maintenance and operation
    • Design of storm water retention reduces run-off and erosion
    • Site lighting is designed to meet Dark Sky standards

    Click here to read more about this exciting project!

    This slideshow requires JavaScript.

    We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

    If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

    Sincerely,
    Frank Cunha III
    I Love My Architect – Facebook

    FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
    P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
    e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
    mobile: 201.681.3551
    direct: 973.970.3551
    fax: 973.718.4641
    web: http://fc3arch.com
    Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


    New Mixed Use Project in Newark, NJ; Designed by @FC3ARCHITECT

    FC3ARCHITECURE is pleased to announce it’s latest project “On The Boards.”

    This time it’s a three-story mixed-use restoration project located in the heart of Newark.

    BEFORE

    • The design is comprised of 2 floors of 30 residential units (open lofts) over brand new commercial retail space.
    • The structural frame of an existing factory remains, the rest of the building is rejuvenated from the inside and out.
    • Code Upgrades include – new elevator cab, retrofitted guard rails and handrails, fire alarm and security system, new utilities throughout.
    • All windows will be retrofitted with energy efficient thermally insulated units.
    • Exterior envelop will be upgraded to meet current energy requirements.
    • Energy efficient cooling and heating system with Energy Star appliances.

    Click Here to see more projects.

    Also Check Out:

    We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

    If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

    Sincerely,
    Frank Cunha III
    I Love My Architect – Facebook

    FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
    P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
    e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
    mobile: 201.681.3551
    direct: 973.970.3551
    fax: 973.718.4641
    web: http://fc3arch.com
    Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.