House K by Sou Fujimoto Architects

A Slice of Life for a Modern Family: In sharp contrast to the client’s previous Western-style dwelling, this open, loftlike house encourages togetherness—a quality of life still prized by the Japanese.

By Naomi R. Pollock, AIA

Conceptually, the quirky house on an L-shaped lot in the affluent outskirts of Osaka has a lot in common with a traditional Japanese dwelling. Fixed, internal walls are conspicuously absent, furnishings delineate functional zones, and the roof is the defining architectural element. It even has a hanare, or freestanding room separated from the main house. But any likeness between old and new comes to a screeching halt there. Called House K after the first letter of the client’s last name, the latest home from Sou Fujimoto—a Tokyo architect known to push residential design to extremes—is a single, swooping volume that emerges gently from the ground and then rapidly surges upward before tapering to a blunt point at the site’s east end. Studded with trees in giant steel planters, the sloped wedge of a house looks more like a man-made landform than a place to call home.

Click here to read the rest of the story

Completion Date: July 2012

Size: 1,275 square feet

Total construction cost: withheld

Architect: Sou Fujimoto Architects

House K - 002

Image Courtesy Sou Fujimoto Architects

House K - 003

Image Courtesy Sou Fujimoto Architects

House K - 001

Image Courtesy Sou Fujimoto Architects

House K - 007

Photo © Iwan Baan

House K - 006

Photo © Iwan Baan

House K - 004

Photo © Iwan Baan

House K - 005

Photo © Iwan Baan

Also Check Out:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


#EcoMonday Contemporary Mediterranean Home With a “Breathing” Eco-Façade

Breathing House 14

Excerpt from “Freshhomes Design & Architecture”: Travessa de Patrocinio is one of those bohemian places in Lisbon that require a sweet disposition while visiting. The unique collaboration between these three designers, Luís Rebelo de AndradeTiago Rebelo de Andrade and Manuel Cachão Tojal, gave birth to a project inspired by minimalism, with an interesting Mediterranean “coverage”. Imagine a thick “coat” of plants shadowing the entire façade of a house that spreads vertically. “Its walls are completely covered with vegetation, creating a vertical garden, filled with around 4500 plants from 25 different Iberian and Mediterranean varieties which occupies 100 square meters. So, short levels of water consumption are guaranteed as well as little gardening challenges.”  Click here to read the rest of the story.

Breathing House 00

Breathing House 0

Excerpt from Architizer News: The House in Travessa do Patrocínio by RA\\ ( Luís Rebelo de Andrade, Tiago Rebelo de Andrade, Manuel Cachão Tojal) does just that. The narrow townhouse is situated smack dab in Lisbon, in a neighborhood with little access to green spaces. To compensate for this lack, the architects draped the house with lush green facades that cover 100 square-meters of wall space. But this isn’t your run-of-the-mill green building accessory. The facades are integral components to the architecture, not just tacked on for a higher LEED score. They’re planted with approximately 4,500 plants sourced from 25 different local varieties, which  all require little maintenance. The result is a vertical garden that the architects say functions as an urban “lung” within the pavement-heavy area, helping to rid the residential street of excess noise, carbon, and other pollutants floating about. Click here to read the rest of the story.
Breathing House 13

Breathing House 16 Breathing House 15 Breathing House 13 Breathing House 12 Breathing House 11 Breathing House 10 Breathing House 09 Breathing House 08 Breathing House 07    Breathing House 03 Breathing House 02 Breathing House 01

A Brief History of Green Walls

The concept of green walls is an ancient one, with examples in architectural history
reaching back to the Babylonians – with the famous Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one
of the seven ancient wonders of the world. Highlights of the history of green walls are
provided below:

  • 3rd C. BCE to 17th C. AD: Throughout the Mediterranean, Romans train grape vines (Vitis species) on garden trellises and on villa walls. Manors and castles with climbing roses are symbols of secret gardens.
  • 1920s: The British and North American garden city movement promote the integration of house and garden through features such as pergolas, trellis structures and self-clinging climbing plants.
  • 1988: Introduction of a stainless steel cable system for green facades.
  • Early 1990s: Cable and wire-rope net systems and modular trellis panel systems enter the North American marketplace.
  • 1993: First major application of a trellis panel system at Universal CityWalk in California.
  • 1994: Indoor living wall with bio-filtration system installed in Canada Life Building in Toronto, Canada.
  • 2002: The MFO Park, a multi-tiered 300’ long and 50’ high park structure opened in Zurich, Switzerland. The project featured over 1,300 climbing plants.
  • 2005: The Japanese federal government sponsored a massive Bio Lung exhibit, the centerpiece of Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan. The wall is comprised of 30 different modular green wall systems available in Japan.
  • 2007: Seattle implements the Green Factor, which includes green walls.
  • 2007: GRHC launches full day Green Wall Design 101 course; the first on the subject in North America.
  • 2008: GRHC launches Green Wall Award of Excellence and Green Wall Research Fund.

Source: GreenScreen

Biofiltration

An ‘active’ living wall is intended to be integrated into a building’s infrastructure and designed to biofilter indoor air and provide thermal regulation. It is a hydroponic system fed by nutrient rich water which is re-circulated from a manifold, located at the top of the wall, and collected in a gutter at the bottom of the fabric wall system. Plant roots are sandwiched between two layers of synthetic fabric that support microbes and a dense root mass. These root microbes remove airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs), while foliage absorbs carbon monoxide and dioxide. The plants’ natural processes produce cool fresh air that is drawn through the system by a fan and then distributed throughout the building. A variation of this concept could be applied to green facade systems as well, and there is potential to apply a hybrid of systems at a large scale.

Source: GreenScreen

Public Benefits of Green Walls

Breathing House 101b

Source: GreenScreen

Private Benefits of Green Walls

Breathing House 101a

Source: GreenScreen

Also Check Out:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Contemporary Philosophy – Postmodernism & Critical Theory – Álvaro Siza Vieira

Álvaro Siza Vieira

Broadly and variously defined, Postmodernism refers to a specific period of time that began in the 1940s, a style of literature, architecture, art philosophy, or the plight of Western society in post-capitalist age.  This movement encompasses a set of critical and rhetorical practicesemploying concepts such as difference, repetition, and hyperreality to break apart or deconstruct other the structural elements achieved through modernism, including temporality, presence, identity, historical progress, epistemic certainty, and meaning achieved through unity.  For more information on Postmodernism, please click here.

Álvaro Joaquim de Melo Siza VieiraGOSEGCIH, is a contemporary Portuguese architect, born 25 June 1933 in Matosinhos a small coastal town by Porto. He is internationally known as Álvaro Siza (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈaɫvɐɾu ˈsizɐ].

He graduated in architecture in 1955, at the former School of Fine Arts from the University of Porto, the current FAUP – Faculdade de Arquitectura da Universidade do Porto. He completed his first built work (four houses in Matosinhos) even before ending his studies in 1954, the same year that he first opened his private practice in Porto. Siza Vieira taught at the school from 1966 to 1969, returning in 1976. In addition to his teaching there, he has been a visiting professor at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University; the University of Pennsylvania; Los Andes University of Bogota; and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne.

Along with Fernando Távora, he is one of the references of the Porto School of Architecture where both were teachers. Both architects worked together between 1955 and 1958. Another architect he has collaborated with is Eduardo Souto de Moura, e.g. on Portugal’s flagship pavilions at Expo 98 in Lisbon and Expo 2000 in Hannover, as well as on the Serpentine Pavillon 2005. Siza’s work is often described as “poetic modernism“; he himself has contributed to publications on Luis Barragán.

Most of his best known works are located in his hometown Porto: the Boa Nova Tea House (1963), the Faculty of Architecture (1987–93), and the Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art (1997). Since the mid-1970s, Siza has been involved in numerous designs for public housing and universities. Most recently, he started coordinating the rehabilitation of the monuments and architectonic heritage of Cidade Velha (Old Village) in Santiago, an island of Cape Verde.

Álvaro Siza Vieira Hompage

Click Here

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Contemporary Philosophy, Critical Theory and Postmodern Thought

Theodor Adorno Louis Althusser Roland Barthes
Michael Bakhtin Jean Baudrillard Walter Benjamin
Maurice Blanchot Kenneth Burke Albert Borgmann
Jacques Derrida Gilles Deleuze Terry Eagleton
Stanley Fish Michel Foucault Frankfurt School
Hans-George Gadamer Anthony Giddens Antonio Gramsci
Felix Guattari Jurgen Habermas Donna Haraway
Martin Heidegger Agnes Heller Max Horkheimer
Edmund Husserl Ivan Illich Fredric Jameson
Julia Kristeva Jacques Lacan Bruno Latour
Jean Francois Lyotard Georg Lukács Paul de Man
Herbert Marcuse Karl Marx Maurice Merleau-Ponty
Richard Rorty Jean-Paul Sartre Edward Said
Charles Taylor Paul Virilio Ludwig Wittgenstein

If you like this post please share it with friends.
Free subscriptions still available.

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Library of Birmingham by Mecanoo Architects

Whenever I see innovative design I like to share it with my friends.  I hope you enjoy this project by Mecanoo Architects.

If you like this post please share it.
Sincerely,

Frank Cunha III 
I Love My Architect – Facebook

© Mecanoo Architects

© Mecanoo Architects

© Mecanoo Architects

© Mecanoo Architects

© Mecanoo Architects

The Library of Birmingham (located in the UK) will comprise of 10 levels, with nine above ground and a lower ground floor. It is being constructed using 21,000m³ of concrete in the frame, enough to fill more than eight Olympic sized swimming pools. The frame is reinforced by 3,000 tonnes of steel reinforcement, the equivalent weight of around 35,750 average UK men. 30,000m³ of material, enough to fill 60,000 bath tubs, had to be dug out of the basement. The building will feature a spacious entrance and foyer with mezzanine, the gateway to both the Library and the Birmingham Repertory Theatre, to which the new Library will be physically connected. There will also be a new flexible studio theatre, a lower ground level with indoor terraces, four further public levels and two outdoor elevated garden terraces. A ‘golden box’ of secure archive storage will occupy two levels of the building, within which the city’s internationally significant collection of archives, photography and rare books will be stored. A new state-of-the-art exhibition space will open up public access to the collections for the first time. The exterior of the building, from the first to the eighth floor will be wrapped with an intricate metal façade, echoing the tunnels, canals and viaducts which fuelled Birmingham’s industrial growth. Besides the Shakespeare Memorial Room and the new shared studio theatre with neighbouring Repertory Theatre, Birmingham’s 35,000m² new library will comprise a study centre, music library, community health centre, multimedia, archives, offices, exhibition halls and cafes.  For the rest of the article click here.  Text provided by Mecanoo Architecten.