DE CHIRICO

Giorgio de Chirico (July 10, 1888 – 20 November 20, 1978), an Italian artist, who in the years before World War I, founded the scuola metafisica art movement, which profoundly influenced the surrealists. After 1919, he became interested in traditional painting techniques, and worked in a neoclassical or neo-Baroque style, while frequently revisiting the metaphysical themes of his earlier work.
De Chirico is best known for the paintings he produced between 1909 and 1919, his metaphysical period, which are characterized by haunted, brooding moods evoked by their images. At the start of this period, his subjects were still cityscapes inspired by the bright daylight of Mediterranean cities, but gradually he turned his attention to studies of cluttered storerooms, sometimes inhabited by mannequin-like hybrid figures. 

 

   
    
    
    
    
 
  
 
 

In autumn, 1919, De Chirico published an article in Valori Plastici entitled “The Return of Craftsmanship”, in which he advocated a return to traditional methods and iconography. This article heralded an abrupt change in his artistic orientation, as he adopted a classicizing manner inspired by such old masters as Raphael and Signorelli, and became an outspoken opponent of modern art.In the paintings of his metaphysical period, De Chirico developed a repertoire of motifs—empty arcades, towers, elongated shadows, mannequins, and trains among others—that he arranged to create “images of forlornness and emptiness” that paradoxically also convey a feeling of “power and freedom”. According to Sanford Schwartz, De Chirico—whose father was a railroad engineer—painted images that suggest “the way you take in buildings and vistas from the perspective of a train window. His towers, walls, and plazas seem to flash by, and you are made to feel the power that comes from seeing things that way: you feel you know them more intimately than the people do who live with them day by day.”

In 1982, Robert Hughes wrote that De Chirico “could condense voluminous feeling through metaphor and association … In The Joy of Return, 1915, de Chirico’s train has once more entered the city … a bright ball of vapor hovers directly above its smokestack. Perhaps it comes from the train and is near us. Or possibly it is a cloud on the horizon, lit by the sun that never penetrates the buildings, in the last electric blue silence of dusk. It contracts the near and the far, enchanting one’s sense of space. Early de Chiricos are full of such effects. Et quid amabo nisi quod aenigma est? (“What shall I love if not the enigma?”)—this question, inscribed by the young artist on his self-portrait in 1911, is their subtext.”

In this, he resembles his more representational American contemporary, Edward Hopper: their pictures’ low sunlight, their deep and often irrational shadows, their empty walkways and portentous silences creating an enigmatic visual poetry.

For more information on Giorgio de Chirico click here.

  
    
    
 

 

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The Cooper Union Photomontage


The Cooper Union Architecture School (NYC)
[Revisted with WJM Architect]

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Store Front Photomontage

NYC Collage created by FC3
Vitra NYC Photo taken by FC3
Model: Hedy http://www.hedy.it
Model Photo taken by Ant777 Photos

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Three: Waiting for the Rain

Waiting for the Rain

It was a cold November day in New Jersey
Ana Belle was waiting on the rain
Not a cloud in the sky
Had she been in California,
no one would have blinked an eye.

But New Jersey,
What was she thinking
Waiting on the rain
Clearly visible against blue sky
The crowd begins to form

Excitement was growing
They thought she was going,
That she was going to die
But with a blink of the eye
She gave a pretty wave

Her smile lit up the sky
Even far below, all could see
The lady just enjoyed being free
And Free she was for all to see
A charming sight to break the calm

For Ana Belle, it was just another day
A day of freedom against an open sky
Waiting for the rain on a perfectly clear day
Asked about it, she replied “What can I say?
I’m as free as I can create.” It started to rain.

[end]

Artwork: Frank Cunha III | Poetry: Carl Watts 
 | More Poetry
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Frank Cunha III 

I Love My Architect – Facebook

Waiting for the Rain


Artwork of the Day

“Umbilical” (Masked Information)
Mixed Media – Magazine Collage & Adobe Photoshop
by: Frank Cunha III 

Photo of the Day

“Macro Fuzzy Little Flower Bud”
Photographed on 10/3/2010
by: Frank Cunha III


Artwork of the Day

Newark Bound by Frank Cunha III

Photo of the Day

First Class by Frank Cunha III