What would you say to young students thinking about a career in #Architecture? by @WJMArchitect (Part 2)

I was recently catching up with my buddy Billy Martin and I asked him to help me write about Architecture as a profession.

This is part two of what he had to say….

Question: What would you say to young students thinking about a career in Architecture?

by William J Martin

All of this is part of the plans or “blueprints” of a building to be built.

Architects need to be physically fit and mentally strong. While the building is being constructed, the architects are visiting, checking, walking on steel beams, crawling into foundations, climbing up on the roof. We do this to make sure everything fits together properly and safely.

Knowledge of sports and sports strategy is needed for the architects and workers to be acting as a coordinated team while assembling the building. Thinking ahead to the “next play” is part of the strategy of building a design from the plans. Very often millions of dollars are spent on buildings and architects are there to help get it done.

Schooling—-

Architecture is a licensed profession just like a doctor, a lawyer, or dentist, This means a person must go to and finish college, study, and pass tests given by the government,. Passing the tests shows the person has all the knowledge needed to provide architectural services safely and competently to the public. We don’t want our buildings to fall on people.

Studying hard and doing well in high school is a good start to becoming an architect. English, math, science, history, and especially art, drawing, and computer classes are courses in high school that will prepare you for architecture school. School plays and stage set building, playing sports, being physically fit is also good preparation.

After high school, apply to an accredited architecture college for admission to an architecture learning program. It takes a minimum of five years of college to complete the courses and receive a college degree in architecture.

After college, a 3 year, paid internship is required. You work in a real architect’s office and use the knowledge that was learned in college. You get paid for your valuable work as you learn more. The intern architect works with a licensed architect to learn how exactly to use the knowledge that was learned in the classroom. The internship involves doing everything an architect does, but the more experienced architect guides the intern architect to make sure things are done right.

After the internship is completed, passing the Architectural Registration Exam is the next step. Once you get a passing grade on that exam, the State you live in, will give you an official license to practice architecture and design buildings on your own. You can then start you own company and design buildings for people who need them.

Fallingwater or Kaufmann Residence designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright in 1935 in rural southwestern Pennsylvania http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallingwater

Fallingwater or Kaufmann Residence – 2nd Floor Plan

Green design—

Many architects are now using a design point system called LEED. L E E D stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design and is a green building rating system by which buildings are designed, constructed and rated for energy efficiency and environmental sensitivity. Buildings are designed and built using environmentally responsible construction materials and methods.

The importance of architecture as a profession–

Architects are more important then ever to our country and our environment. Right now architects around the world are using math, science and computers to design new kinds of buildings that will save energy and reduce damage to the environment. Everyone needs a home or building in which to live or work. Having buildings that use less electricity, less heating in winter, less air conditioning in summer, will use much less energy. That means power plants will produce less power and reduce pollution of the air and water. This is important to preserve the environment now and in the future.

(Click Here to read Part 1 of 2)

Also Check Out:

If you like this post please share it with friends and family, especially those with children aspiring to become Architects.

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://www.fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT


What would you say to young students thinking about a career in #Architecture? by @WJMArchitect (Part 1)

I was recently catching up with my buddy Billy Martin and  I asked him to help me write about Architecture as a profession.

This is part one of what he had to say….

Question: What would you say to young students thinking about a career in Architecture? 

by William J Martin

I speak with students all the time about architecture as a profession.. ok …… 13-14 year olds………here goes…

Architecture as a profession–

The architectural profession has a long history. It goes back thousands of years to when the first humans put rocks and tree branches together and created shelter to protect and comfort themselves from nature’s cold, hot, snow, rain, earthquakes, etc.

Moving forward in time, ancient Egyptian architects created the Pyramids, Chinese architects created the Great Wall, Greek architects created the Acropolis and Parthenon, Roman architects created cities, aqueducts, coliseum, etc. and in the modern age, architects have created skyscrapers, sports stadiums, department stores, as well as homes.

Architecture is, first of all, an art. Artistic beauty, correct layout of the interior, heat and air conditioning, construction cost all need to be considered in designing buildings. In other words, It has to look “COOL” inside and out, not leak from the roof, not be too hot or cold, and not cost too much to build.

An architect has the knowledge and training to figure out how to blend all these things together.

Architects design buildings with all these things in mind. In many ways it is like solving a giant 3-dimensional puzzle. OR like playing a video game where the goal is to place and move objects and materials together to create a complicated machine that works for shelter and looks “COOLER” than anyone else’s.

Watercolor of Hagia Sophia by Unknown http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hagia_Sophia

Architects use drawings, art, history, social studies, math, science, astronomy, sports, and computers to design and plan buildings.

Architects use art and drawings to plan out spaces and shapes that will look and feel “pleasing” to people. We use computers to help imagine what the building designs would look like and compare different shapes, colors, materials and ideas. We call this simply the “design process”.

Architects use mathematical calculations to determine safe beam and column sizes to build safe stable buildings. We use science and chemistry to design materials such as concrete, stone, wood. We use the science of water and pipes for plumbing. We use the science of electricity for wiring and lighting. We use astronomy to calculate the sun angles for window locations and daylighting inside buildings. We use the history of buildings that were built before, to design new buildings, like a bank with big columns in front. We also create completely new shapes and spaces to solve a new need for space that maybe did not exist before, like a golf driving range with 3 levels so more golfers can hit balls at the same time. We use writing, cameras, computers, video and other media to plan and explain ideas.

If you like this post please share it with friends and family, especially those with children aspiring to become Architects.

(Click Here to read Part 2 of 2)

Also Check Out:

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://www.fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.