Art Everyone Should Know – Selfies By Vincent van Gogh #ILMA #Art

Before Instagram there was Vincent van Gogh who painted over 30 selfportraits between the years 1886 and 1889. His collection of selfportraits places him among the most prolific self-portraitists of all time. Van Gogh used portraitpainting as a method of introspection, a method to make money and a method of developing his skills as an artist.

Vincent van Gogh (30 March 1853 – 29 July 1890) was a Dutch Post-Impressionist painter who is among the most famous and influential figures in the history of Western art. In just over a decade he created about 2,100 artworks, including around 860 oil paintings, most of them in the last two years of his life. They include landscapes, still lifes, portraits and self-portraits, and are characterised by bold colours and dramatic, impulsive and expressive brushwork that contributed to the foundations of modern art. During his lifetime, he was not commercially successful and his suicide at 37 followed years of mental illness and poverty.

Here are some examples of his selfies:

If any of these are “fakes” please let me know.

We would love to hear from you about what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends.

Feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Design by Architectist @FrankCunhaIII #Architect #Artist

Thank you for all the support and encouragement over the years.  Here are some of our favorite blog posts about the design process related to the field of Architecture:

  1. Architecture Shall Live On (My Architecture Manifesto) by @FrankCunhaIII
  2. Timeless Architecture – Saying Good Bye to a Teacher/Mentor is Never Easy by @FrankCunhaIII
  3. Architecture in Motion by @FrankCunhaIII
  4. X Factor of Design by @FrankCunhaIII
  5. Creating High Performance Buildings through Integrative Design Process by @FrankCunhaIII
  6. Frans Johansson: “Act & Collaborate to Drive Change” by @FrankCunhaIII
  7. SPACE & PROCESS by @FrankCunhaIII
  8. Order, Formulas, and Rules by @FrankCunhaIII
  9. Mixing My Work With Pleasure (Design-Build, Modern House Using Legos) by @FrankCunhaIII
  10. The Blind Design Paradox in Architectural Design by @WJMArchitect
  11. Architects Vs. “Sculptor” Architects based on a conversation btw @WJMArchitect and @FrankCunhaIII
  12. Ophiuchus: The Serpent Bearer (Playing With Numbers) by @FrankCunhaIII
  13. From Paper and Pencil to Reality Through Collaboration by @FrankCunhaIII

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Architect’s Sketchbook – Montclair State University (Sketches by @FrankCunhaIII, 2017)

College Hall is where the history and the future of Montclair State meet. It’s where every student’s college journey begins with Undergraduate Admissions and ends with the submission of their final audit to the Office of the Registrar for graduation.

College Hall is where it all started. Back in 1903, the New Jersey State Normal School in Trenton could no longer support New Jersey’s growing need for qualified teachers by itself, so the state approved plans for a new normal school to serve northern New Jersey. (A normal school was a post-secondary school devoted to training teachers.) And in 1908, the New Jersey State Normal School at Montclair admitted its first students.

College Hall’s Spanish mission-style architecture, which was adopted for other buildings on campus, was the inspiration of benefactor Edward Russ, a member of the New Jersey State Board of Education who liked buildings he saw on a trip to California. So he integrated the style into plans for College Hall, complete with red-tile roofs—a look that lives on in campus construction today.

In the beginning, College Hall housed almost everything—administrative offices, classrooms, a library and a gym. Today, it is Montclair State’s administrative hub, housing the offices of the President and the Provost, University Advancement, Admissions, the Registrar, the Graduate School and more.

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Dedicated to the first president of Montclair State, Charles S. Chapin, in 1928, it is one of the original buildings of the Montclair State Normal School. This former residence hall was renovated in 1974, and again in 2009, and is now the home of the John J. Cali School of Music. The Leshowitz Recital Hall is also located in Chapin Hall.

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Russ Hall was built in 1915 and served as the first residential facility of the State Normal School at Montclair, now of course known as Montclair State University. Converted at one point to an administrative building and then later renovated back to a residence hall, Russ Hall provides suite-style accommodations for approximately 100 students.

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IMG_2253Dedicated to Allan C. Morehead, an alumnus and former professor, executive vice president and provost at Montclair State. Morehead Hall was used as a demonstration high school from 1929 to 1973. It now houses several student support services offices.

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Architect’s Sketchbook – Cape May, NJ (Sketches by @FrankCunhaIII, August 5, 2017)

A few sketches from my brief trip to Cape May after my triathlon race.

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DE CHIRICO

Giorgio de Chirico (July 10, 1888 – 20 November 20, 1978), an Italian artist, who in the years before World War I, founded the scuola metafisica art movement, which profoundly influenced the surrealists. After 1919, he became interested in traditional painting techniques, and worked in a neoclassical or neo-Baroque style, while frequently revisiting the metaphysical themes of his earlier work.
De Chirico is best known for the paintings he produced between 1909 and 1919, his metaphysical period, which are characterized by haunted, brooding moods evoked by their images. At the start of this period, his subjects were still cityscapes inspired by the bright daylight of Mediterranean cities, but gradually he turned his attention to studies of cluttered storerooms, sometimes inhabited by mannequin-like hybrid figures. 

 

   
    
    
    
    
 
  
 
 

In autumn, 1919, De Chirico published an article in Valori Plastici entitled “The Return of Craftsmanship”, in which he advocated a return to traditional methods and iconography. This article heralded an abrupt change in his artistic orientation, as he adopted a classicizing manner inspired by such old masters as Raphael and Signorelli, and became an outspoken opponent of modern art.In the paintings of his metaphysical period, De Chirico developed a repertoire of motifs—empty arcades, towers, elongated shadows, mannequins, and trains among others—that he arranged to create “images of forlornness and emptiness” that paradoxically also convey a feeling of “power and freedom”. According to Sanford Schwartz, De Chirico—whose father was a railroad engineer—painted images that suggest “the way you take in buildings and vistas from the perspective of a train window. His towers, walls, and plazas seem to flash by, and you are made to feel the power that comes from seeing things that way: you feel you know them more intimately than the people do who live with them day by day.”

In 1982, Robert Hughes wrote that De Chirico “could condense voluminous feeling through metaphor and association … In The Joy of Return, 1915, de Chirico’s train has once more entered the city … a bright ball of vapor hovers directly above its smokestack. Perhaps it comes from the train and is near us. Or possibly it is a cloud on the horizon, lit by the sun that never penetrates the buildings, in the last electric blue silence of dusk. It contracts the near and the far, enchanting one’s sense of space. Early de Chiricos are full of such effects. Et quid amabo nisi quod aenigma est? (“What shall I love if not the enigma?”)—this question, inscribed by the young artist on his self-portrait in 1911, is their subtext.”

In this, he resembles his more representational American contemporary, Edward Hopper: their pictures’ low sunlight, their deep and often irrational shadows, their empty walkways and portentous silences creating an enigmatic visual poetry.

For more information on Giorgio de Chirico click here.

  
    
    
 

 

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!
-FRANKCUNHAIII


Bicycle Photographic Artwork

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Photos by FRANK CUNHA III (2015)
Media: iPhone photo
Post Edits: Snapseed App

 


“Art that Everyone Should Know” #3 by @SophiaFine

Friends,

I recently asked my friend Sophia Fine to compile a series of posts of artists and artwork that should be known in every household. 

This is the third in the series…Hope you enjoy it!

Sincerely,
Frank

Read the rest of this entry »


New Art And Poetry By My Friend Karen Glosser @kglosserdesigns

Nature Whispers

Clear skyDeep crystalline blue
Sun, lingering late day warmth
Golden

My mind wanders…
I close my eyes
Pause…
Longing for more summer

Refreshing wind
Gentle rustling above
Eyes open, fiery auburn light
I look up

And Nature whispers,
“It is time to move on…
Look closer…
I have something new to show you.”
KGLosserDesigns

(Photo: Autumn, Afire.  Karen Glosser)

Also Check Out:

If you like this post please share it and spread the love.

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


“Art that Everyone Should Know” #1 by @SophiaFine

Friends,

I recently asked my friend Sophia Fine to compile a series of posts of artists and artwork that should be known in every household. 

This is the first in the series…Hope you enjoy it!

Sincerely,
Frank

Read the rest of this entry »


Post-Minimalist Art by Miya Ando

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Miya Ando is an American post-minimalist artist. She has done most of her works in countries besides the United States. Ando is of half-Japanese and half-Russian heritage and is a descendent of Bizen sword maker Ando Yoshiro Masakatsu. She was raised by sword smiths-turned Buddhist priests in a Buddhist temple in Okayama, Japan and in the redwoods of Santa Cruz, California. After graduating from UC Berkeley with a degree in East Asian Studies, Ando attended Yale University to study Buddhist iconography and imagery before apprenticing at the Hattori Studio in Japan.

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Ando’s work has been featured in solo exhibitions in several U.S. states including New York and California. Ando has also exhibited in France, Australia, England, Germany, and Tokyo, Japan. Ando’s work can be found at Aldrich Contemporary, the Newhouse Center for Contemporary Art, the Byzantine Museum in Greece, and in Chapman University’s private collection.[citation needed]
In 2009, Against the Stream Buddhist Meditation Society commissioned Ando’s piece, “8-Fold Path,” which consists of a grid of four steel square canvases measuring 4 feet each. The work was featured in a July 2009 article for Shambhala Sun for its “meditative” nature and “spiritual” influence. Also in 2009, Ando created “Fiat Lux” (“Let There Be Light”), a grid of 144 individual 5″ x 5″ steel canvasses for the meditation room in Brooklyn’s St. John’s Bread and Life Chapel. Ando was next commissioned by president Jay Davidson of The Healing Place Non Denominational Chapel to produce an installation for its women’s facility. Ando’s forty-foot, phosphorescent-coated steel piece, “Shelter[Meditation 1-2],” collects sunlight during the day and radiates blue at night. Ando’s latest installation commemorates the tenth anniversary of the September 11 attacks on New York City’s Twin Towers. Commissioned by the 9/11 London Project Foundation as a permanent addition to Potters Fields Park in London, England, Ando’s sculpture stands eight meters tall and is crafted from polished World Trade Center steel. Ando has also completed public commissions for Safdi Plaza Realty, the Thanatopolis Exhibition, San Francisco General Hospital, and CalFire. In 2011, Ando worked on commissions for the Haein Art Project in Korea and the Fist Art Foundation in Puerto Rico.

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Ando became an advocate and public ambassador for Element Skateboards’ 2010 International print and media campaign[citation needed] and won the Thanatopolis Special Artist Award and Public Outdoor Commission in 2010. Ando also received grants from the Puffin Foundation and Gilbert Slomowitz Foundation in 2010 and 2011.[citation needed]
Ando donated 100% of sales from her limited edition 2009 series to the Indigo Youth Movement, a non-profit organization that provides art supplies, books, and school supplies to children of the Isithumba village in South Africa. Ando actively participates in a wide variety of philanthropic collaborations to benefit causes ranging from environmental preservation to humanitarian aid.

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Miya Ando currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Ando’s two- and three-dimensional works reference American minimalism and Zen Reductivism in its exploration of reflectivity and luminosity. According to Rural Intelligence, Ando’s “works on steel canvas are post-minimalism at its very best.”

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We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in CT, DE, FL, MD, NJ, NY, PA.


Architect Artist Le Corbusier

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Le Corbusier – The man best known in black and white finally finds some colour. First published in Paris Match 1953, photographer Willy Rizzo captured the legend in Medium Format colour, the photos somehow not published since. Now, an exhibition at Corbusier’s own Maison La Roche, presented by Fondation Le Corbusier and Mr Rizzo, uncovers these beautiful shots laying out the full palette used in both his architectural drawings and his artwork.

Le Corbusier by Willy Rizzo Sept 19th to Dec 20th, Maison La Roche, 10 square du Docteur Blanche, 75016 Paris – France

 

Le Corbusier was born Charles-Edouard Jeanneret-Gris in Switzerland on October 6, 1887. In 1917, he moved to Paris and assumed the pseudonym Le Corbusier. In his architecture, he chiefly built with steel and reinforced concrete and worked with elemental geometric forms. Le Corbusier’s painting emphasized clear forms and structures, which corresponded to his architecture.

Click here to see one of his most prominent projects which embodies his 5 Points of Architecture.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Who is Vassilis & What is “The Remote Posing Project”

First of all I want to thank everyone for supporting and subscribing to my Art & Architecture (and misc.) blog.  In less than one year we have gone from 100 visitors a day to nearly 1,000 and growing everyday.  Thank you, thank you, thank you!

I have met some really interesting people utilizing various social media sites.  Vassilis, aka “Vasvas” has some of the most intense portraits I have ever seen.  The interesting part is that he does his portraits remotely.  Read on to learn about his process and how he creates these intriguing images of people all around the world, many which he has never met in person.

Vasvas, your work is incredible.  Can you tell us about your latest project and how did you get started with this project?

Thank you very much! My project is called “Remote Posing Project”. I post in instagram and Flickr hi contrast and highly detailed portraits. My portraits are extreme close ups of people’s faces in order to get the required detail. After posting some of my photos on instagram, a guy with nickname @Nixxin (Ben Boyd from Mississauga, Ontario) sent me a portrait of him to edit.

The post was very successful and I thought that as my shooting process is very simple (put your iPhone close to your nose and shoot!), I could sent some simple instructions and people from all over the world will send me their photos for editing. The Remote Posing Project (the name sucks!) was born! So far I’ve made the portraits of 19 people from USA to Australia! 

Can you explain your artistic process?  Which artists if any are you influenced by?

The summary of my process is that I convert a color photo to a HDR black and white photograph. I use only my iPhone 4 for shooting and editing my portraits. The process was discovered by chance one day I was fooling around with some applications… The result was impressive and I perfected the process. My process enhances extremely the details of the skin making some people think  I shoot with an expensive DSL camera.. But it’s just an iPhone 4 or 4s and good lighting conditions! The comment I usually receive is that although I make people look ugly I capture their soul in my photos. Some others say that I make people look like coal miners, which I think, is true! Also women avoid sending me their faces!!! In my opinion I make some very interesting detailed portraits and that is all…. I don’t have have any influences, I never thought that I will be shooting portraits…. But I’m sure there are some great photographers who made this style of photography before me….

So far beside the people participating in the project, I had the pleasure to cooperate with some great instagrammers like Evren Dede (@evrendede) from Greece with who I made my most popular photo and Serhan Keser (@serhankeser) from Turkey who donated a great face to my collection!

Self Portrait by Vassilis This is my ugly face...! I use this photo for my avatar in Instagram. The original caption is "Vassilis Segos, Marriage Counselor". I try to use humorous or intriguing captions in my photos...."

Self Portrait by Vassilis This is another photo of me, previously unreleased. I posted this in a dating site with no success at all...!

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Giuseppe Longo Exposé

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing one of my Twitter/Facebook friends, Giuseppe Longo of  fashion + class & jet lag.  The following is the pre-launch interview.

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1) When did you get interested in fashion, culture, and lifestyle?

I don’t think there ever was a period in time when interest suddenly sparked for fashion, culture, and lifestyle. I feel that I’m continuing with what I grew up; parts of my life since childhood. Dad played Johann Strauss + Beethoven in the car, Mom has always had an impeccable eye for fashion & design. We traveled as a family. I just absorbed and learned from the best.

2) How has social media changed your life?

Interesting enough, it has changed my life. I started fashion + class & jet lag as a Twitter account and it just keeps growing. And I’m soon launching my novel online, which that too, touches on social media. I’ve met some very interesting people as well as made new friends. I’ve also traveled and done some exciting collaborations. Social media is a powerful tool. I get news much faster than traditional media- at the refreshing of a web page.

3) Who are your heroes, who do you emulate?Simply stated, the world is my muse. Like a chameleon, I am who I am because of everything and everyone I surround myself with. I try my best to mirror the world.4) Name a historical figure you would like to meet.

Sofia Loren, preferably to have coffee + a conversation. She’s a symbol of class and elegance.

5) What are 3 basic things everyone should know about fashion?

1| Skinny jeans are not for everyone
2| Tennis shoes and sweats are an eyesore and for sports, not everyday use
3| Confidence is the most important part of your wardrobe

6) How does art inform fashion and vice-versa.

It depends. This question can go in so many directions… Taking it as if art as a whole influences fashion, I believe yes. Perhaps a pattern on a wrought-iron gate will make a great print on a tie or a certain red from one of Botticelli’s paintings could transfer well onto a coat. Also, architecture from a building could transform and give a pair of heels character to really set it apart. So to that extent, art does inform fashion.

And looking at fashion and if it informs art, it is possible. A great example would be the late Alexander McQueen. His designs were artistic brilliance; he enthralled, engaged, and entertained the mind.

7) What are your 3 favorite cities for fashion?

We hope to catch up with Giuseppe Longo of  fashion + class & jet lag soon after he launches his new online novel.

If you like this post please share it.

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III 
I Love My Architect – Facebook


A Tribute to Raimund Abraham

In third year of Architecture studio Abraham was one of the Artist/Architects I emulated.  His theoretical works inspired me as a young Architect.

Raimund Johann Abraham was born in LienzTyrol. He studied architecture at the Technical University in Graz and in 1959 established an architectural studio in Vienna, where he soon emerged as a leading avant-gardist.  In 1964 he moved to the United States. He taught at the Rhode Island School of Design and, from 1971, at the Cooper Union in Manhattan and Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. In 2003 he became a visiting faculty member at the Southern California Institute of Architecture.

Among his best-known works is the Austrian Cultural Forum Building in New York City.

Abraham was taken from us suddenly when he died in a car accident in downtown Los Angeles in the early morning of March 4, 2010 after the car he was driving was struck by a bus. Abraham had given a lecture titled “The Profanation of Solitude”, at the Southern California Institute of Architecture a few hours before his death. He features prominently in Jonas Mekas‘s film As I Was Moving Ahead Occasionally I Saw Brief Glimpses of Beauty, which shows the baptism of his daughter Una.

Click on this image for some more inspiring work by Abraham.


Mini Manhattan Carved by Japanese Artist Yataka Sone

I recently read an article on this artist and could not wait to share him with you.  Recently put on display at the David Zwirner gallery in New York, Japanese Artist Yataka Sone used photographic reproductions, imagery from Google Earth, and several helicopter rides to painstaking recreate Manhattan in marble.  Every detail (Central Park, skyscrapers, streets, avenues, and the bridges to the east and west) was recreated to scale.  Read the article here.


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