An Introduction to the Architecture of the Italian Renaissance By Classical Architect and Artist ‪@FTerryArchitect ‬#RIBA #Architecture #Education #ilmaBlog

Earlier this year UK-based Francis Terry MA (Cantab), Dip Arch, RIBA Director, gave his office a wonderful presentation I would like to share with my audience:

Francis is part of a new generation of classical architects who have recently gained a reputation for designing high quality works of architecture. Francis’s pursuit of architecture grew out of his passion for drawing and his love of historic buildings. He studied architecture at Cambridge University qualifying in 1994. While at Cambridge, he used his architectural skills to design numerous stage sets for various dramatic societies including The Footlights, The Cambridge Opera Society and The European Theatre Group.

Terry along with his colleague also talk about classical architecture in modern times at a recent TEDx Talk:

More Information available by clicking here. Not only does his website display great examples of classical architecture but he has a great blog with interesting writings and videos.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Understanding Classical Proportions in Architecture & Design #ILMA #ClassicalArchitecture #Design

662A391D-65D7-4ECA-9A3E-35D07140F9B4.jpegThe following is an easy to understand reference guide to understanding the basics of classical proportions:

Further reading:

  • Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture by Vitruvius (Author), Herbert Langford Warren (Illustrator), Morris Hickey Morgan (Translator)
  • The American Vignola: A Guide to the Making of Classical Architecture by William R. Ware
  • The Five Books of Architecture by Sebastino Serlio
  • Canon of the Five Orders of Architecture by Giacomo Barozzi da Vignola (Author), John Leeke (Translator), David Watkin (Introduction)
  • The Four Books of Architecture by Andrea Palladio (Author), Adolf K. Placzek (Introduction)

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


GREEN LINKS

    1. 13 Examples of Green Architecture
    2. Materiality and Green Architecture: The Effect of Building Materials on Sustainability and Design
    3. Green Glass at Corning Museum
    4. @babfari Recognized for Green Architecture and Design
    5. 10 Simple Steps To Living Green Tips
    6. Who or What is the US Green Building Council
    7. Why Is Green Design and Construction Important?
    8. High Performance Building Design
    9. Passive Temperature Control and Other Sustainable Design Elements to Consider
    10. You Know LEED, But Do You Know WELL?
    11. Creating High Performance Buildings through Integrative Design Process
    12. Awesome LEED Project in NJ ::: “CENTRA” by @KohnPedersenFox
    13. Contemporary Mediterranean Home With a “Breathing” Eco-Façade
    14. What is a High Performance School?
    15. Exclusive #EcoMonday Interview with Architect Bill Reed with host @FrankCunhaIII (Part 1 of 3)
    16. Exclusive #EcoMonday Interview with Architect Bill Reed with host @FrankCunhaIII (Part 2 of 3)
    17. Exclusive #EcoMonday Interview with Architect Bill Reed with host @FrankCunhaIII (Part 3 of 3)
    18. Team New Jersey To Make Precast Concrete Solar House Reality and @RutgersU and @NJIT Compete in 2012 Solar Decathlon
    19. The 2030 Challenge for Planning @Arch2030
    20. What is The 2030 Challenge? @Arch2030
    21. Sustainable Cities
    22. Cool Concrete Home in Jersey City

    We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

    Sincerely,

    FRANK CUNHA III
    I Love My Architect – Facebook


    Prototyping Future Worlds with Futurist Architect Filmmaker @Liam_Young featured on Mind & Machine Podcast with Host @AugustBradley #Technology #Art #Film #ilmaBlog

    Earlier this week I heard a great podcast on Mind & Machine, hosted by August Bradley I wanted to share with you.
    MIND & MACHINE: Future Technology, Futurist Ideas (Published on Apr 9, 2018)

    Liam Young, Speculative Architect, Futurist, Sci-fi Shaper, Extreme Explorer, Provocateur, Technology Storyteller, who uses his design background combined with experience in crafting environments to prototype new worlds — worlds that reveal unexpected aspects of how we live today and how we will live in the future. Liam teaches speculative architecture and world building at Sci Arc, a leading architecture school. He founded Unknown Fields, a nomadic studio documenting expeditions to the ends of the earth, exploring unusual forgotten landscapes, and obsolete ecologies. And Liam has co-founded Tomorrows Thoughts Today, a futures think tank envisioning fantastic speculative urban settings of tomorrow.
    Podcast version at: https://is.gd/MM_on_iTunes

    More about and from Liam at:

    http://www.propela.co.uk/liamyoung
    MIND & MACHINE features interviews by August Bradley with leaders in transformational technologies.
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/augustbradley
    Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/mindandmachine
    Website: https://www.MindAndMachine.io

    We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

    Sincerely,

    FRANK CUNHA III
    I Love My Architect – Facebook

     


    How Many Architects Are There in the World?

    Monditalia infographic; via ArchDaily

    Monditalia infographic; via ArchDaily

    (Source: https://architizer.com/blog/inspiration/industry/how-many-architects-are-in-the-world)

    And in the U.S.?

    There are 109,748 Architects

    According to The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards, there are 109,748 architects in the United States, according to the 2016 Survey of Architectural Registration Boards. While this represents a minimal drop from the previous year (roughly .4 percent), the survey also reveals that architects increasingly hold licenses in multiple states. In fact, U.S. architects now have 126,554 reciprocal (out-of-state) licenses, a 3 percent increase from 2015.

    Conducted annually by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), the survey provides exclusive insight into the number of U.S. architects and reciprocal licenses.

    The pool of emerging professionals working toward licensure also held steady in 2016, with more than 41,400 candidates taking the Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®) and/or reporting Architectural Experience Program (AXP) hours.

    “Our data confirms that the economy is generating strong demand for initial and reciprocal licensees,” said NCARB CEO Michael J. Armstrong. “We’re also seeing continued growth in the number of architects who hold an NCARB Certificate, which facilitates reciprocal licensure across the U.S. and several countries.”

    Additional data on the path to licensure will be available in July’s 2017 edition of NCARB by the Numbers.

    NCARB collects data on resident and reciprocal licenses from its 54 Member Boards, which include the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The survey reflects registration data from January to December 2016.

    To learn more about NCARB’s data and the Survey of Architectural Registration Boards, visit www.ncarb.org.

    Twitter: www.twitter.com/ncarb
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/NCARB
    YouTube: www.youtube.com/NCARBorg
    (Source: https://www.ncarb.org/press/number-us-architects-2016)

    We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

    Sincerely,

    FRANK CUNHA III
    I Love My Architect – Facebook


    Green Specification Guidance

    GENERAL

    ● Include a requirement in specifications that contractors and subs review HomeFree.

    ● Ask for and prefer products that have a Health Product Declaration (HPD).

    ● Avoid products marketed as antimicrobial and claiming or implying a health benefit.

    FLOORING

    ● Prefer non-vinyl flooring products.

    ● When vinyl is used: Specify phthalate-free; avoid post-consumer recycled content.

    ● For rubber flooring: Avoid post-consumer recycled content (crumb rubber).

    ● For carpets: Look for products that don’t use fluorinated stain-repellent treatments; specify backings that are vinyl-free and polyurethane-free and do not contain fly ash.

    ● For ceramic tiles, prefer those made in the USA where most manufacturers have eliminated toxic lead compounds from ceramic tile glazes. Avoid post-consumer recycled content from CRTs (cathode ray tubes) which contain high concentrations of lead.

    INTERIOR PAINT

    ● Prefer paints that meet the Green Seal-11 (GS-11) standard from 2010 or later whenever possible or specify paints known to be free of alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs).

    ● Specify bases with 10 g/L of VOCs or less and colorants that do not increase the overall VOC content.

    ● At a minimum, specify paint bases and colorants with a VOC content of 50g/L or less.

    ● Look for paints that have VOC emission testing and meet the requirements of the CDPH (California Department of Public Health) Standard Method for Testing VOC Emissions (01350).

    DRYWALL

    ● Specify boards made with natural gypsum.

    ● If possible, avoid pre-consumer recycled content (also known as synthetic gypsum or FGD) to avoid the release of mercury in manufacture.

    THERMAL INSULATION

    ● Specify residential fiber glass batt insulation — it has been reformulated to be free of formaldehyde — or formaldehyde-free mineral wool batts. Unfaced batts are most preferable.

    ● For blown insulation, prefer cellulose or un-bonded fiber glass.

    ● Consider alternatives to rigid board insulation whenever possible. If board insulation is required, specify mineral wool boards and look for those that meet the requirements of CDPH Standard Method for Testing VOC Emissions (01350) for residential scenarios. If plastic foam insulation is used, look for those that are halogen-free. Consider upgrading to expanded cork insulation.

    ● Avoid spray polyurethane foam (SPF) insulation whenever possible.

    ● For sealing applications, prefer caulking or sealant tapes to spray foams.

    COUNTERTOPS

    ● Think of countertops as a system of products: the surface itself, an adhesive, and potentially a surface treatment, which may need to be re-applied regularly. Each of these elements have different health concerns.

    ● Sealant products can introduce hazardous chemicals. Specify countertops that do not need to be sealed after installation, such as engineered stone, cultured marble, or solid surfacing.

    ● Plastic laminate is not a top countertop choice, but if used, specify that the substrate be made with NAF (No Added Formaldehyde) or ULEF (Ultra Low Emitting Formaldehyde) resins. © Healthy Building Network [June 2018]

    CABINETRY & MILLWORK ​+​ DOORS

    ● Prefer solid wood products over composite.

    ● When using composite wood, specify materials that are NAF (No Added Formaldehyde) or ULEF (Ultra Low Emitting Formaldehyde) whenever possible.

    ● Prefer products that are factory-finished.

    ● For edge-banding, specify products with veneer rather than vinyl.

    (Source: https://homefree.healthybuilding.net)

    We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

    Sincerely,

    FRANK CUNHA III
    I Love My Architect – Facebook


    ILMA of The Week

    ILMA of the Week: Eugene Tsui

    ILMA of the Week: Antoine Predock

    ILMA of the Week: Peter Eisenman

    ILMA of the Week: Bruce A. Goff

    ILMA of the Week: Frank H. Furness

    ILMA of the Week: Eero Saarinen

    ILMA of the Week: I. M. Pei

    ILMA of the Week: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

    ILMA of the Week: Eric Owen Moss

    ILMA of the Week: Oscar Niemeyer

    ILMA of the Week: Frank L. Wright

    We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

    Sincerely,

    FRANK CUNHA III
    I Love My Architect – Facebook