Our Exclusive ILMA Interview with Tim Witzig of @PKSBArchitects

This week we have a great interview with Tim Witzig.  I had the pleasure of meeting Tim this year and we had a lengthy conversation.  I think you will be impressed with his take on the world of architecture and design.

About Tim Witzig

Tim Witzig, AIA, Principal at PKSB Architects, is known for his breadth of understanding.  He has played an instrumental role in the success of PKSB for almost two decades.

Mr. Witzig has overseen teams for numerous projects. His experience includes, public and private schools, religious spaces, residential interiors, personalized homes, commercial interiors and a history of projects with civic importance. He served as a designer and Project Manager for the interior renovations of the AIA award-winning Franklin, Mansfield and Shoreham Hotels in New York City.

He was responsible for directing fabrication for guest area upgrades, interior elements and furnishings for all three hotels. Mr. Witzig has also participated in the design and construction administration of the Physics Building Addition and Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology Research Building at the University of Virginia, refurbishments for the Joseph E. Seagram Company in New York, and customized hotel resort interiors for the Walt Disney World Company. Prior to joining PKSB in 1990, Mr. Witzig was a designer at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill with a team developing the first designs for Worldwide Plaza at Columbus Circle. His participation in designing and managing projects with various scales, local code requirements, and unique technical requirements has brought Mr. Witzig a broad understanding of the challenges our client’s face in realizing a project.

About the Firm

PKSB Architects was established in 1964 by Giovanni Pasanella. Celebrating over 50 years in practice, PKSB is recognized as an award-winning full-service firm with a long history of completing projects of every scale and scope. Our practice areas include academic, preservation, institutional, residential, hospitality, public housing, infrastructure, public art, civic memorials, and houses of worship. PKSB’s efforts have been recognized with numerous design awards, including the prestigious P/A Award and AIA honors on the local, state and national levels.

While PKSB’s practice has evolved since its first years as Pasanella + Klein Stolzman + Berg, a commitment to architecture that blends artistry, craft, and pragmatism has always defined its work. The firm has a modernist foundation, but does not rely on a set “PKSB style.” Rather, the needs of the client come first, and PKSB’s strength lies in its ability to create solutions that respond to the unique aspects of each client, program, and location.

“Since its founding in 1964, PKSB has distinguished itself as an innovative practice whose projects combine artistry, craft and pragmatism. A spirit of collaboration and a willingness to explore have been the hallmarks of the firm since its inception.”

When and why did you decide to become an Architect?     

High School age. Seemed to encompass all my interests when I listed them. Before those years I wanted to be a Disney Imagineer.

What were some of the challenges of achieving your dream?  

Math. Undergraduate math, calculus, trig were such failures. Cost of school, lived in a marginal neighborhood in St. Louis to keep my living costs low for a couple of undergraduate years. During grad school working during breaks, working in the library for a little cash in my pocket when I should have been in studio probably. The library that I worked in up at Columbia was the library devoted to library sciences…only… could not have been more boring.

Any memorable clients or project highlights?    

Bess Myerson, Miss America 1945. She made me laugh… not right away. You got the joke on the way home in the re-telling. She wanted a beautiful new modern sculptural stair in her NY apartment renovation. I did not get to design the stair but I watched the process and helped do the drawings for the shell of the apartment. I learned a lot working with her, and helping make presentations and seeing how all talented  people involved worked.

How does your family support what you do?   

They listen to my ranting. Patiently.

How do Architects measure success?  

I think, gladly, that measure is made on very large field. I think if one helps, no matter how small, to make a piece of the world a more beautiful or usable place with our buildings, cities, infrastructure… one is a success. If you enjoy it as well? Huge success.

What matters most to you in design? 

Constructability, utility, timelessness, passing on inspiration to the users in some way.

What do you hope to achieve over the next 2 years? 5 years? 

Focus and allow others to run with the balls.

Who is your favorite Architect? Why? 

I do not really have a favorite, but if pressed on just the Architect part and not the human being part, then Frank Lloyd Wright. He achieved a very warm and approachable transcendence with his own style. If you look up Architect in the dictionary, it would not be wrong to see his picture there I think.

Do you have a coach or mentor? 

A few. The founders of the Architecture firm I am a part of now, Henry Stolzman, and Wayne Berg would go day-by-day explaining the practice and business of Architecture. My current business partner Sherida Paulsen brings reality to my day dreams. Going way back to school days there was William B. Bricken and Leslie Laskey. The latter should me how you could live like a designer and get interested in everything.

What is your favorite historic and modern (contemporary) project? Why? 

That’s so hard there are so many on both ends. Villa Malaparte in Capri. and almost anything Louis Kahn did, Yale British Art, currently I keep looking at Tod Williams and Billie Tsien and their Kim & Tritton Residence Hall. Over and over I stare at that simple building. 2 story residential dorm building with no stairs or elevators inside. Genius.

Where do you see the profession going over the next few decades?  

I think it’s very exciting, and I think Architects or folks who know a thing or two about making buildings will be in high demand. I think the firms will get larger and folks within the firms will be specialized a bit more. I think Architecture as a defined terms will blur and blend into other things we use.

What type of technology do you see in the design and construction industries? 

The 3D modeling and Building Information Modeling and ability to bring that up zoom in to look at all of the “guts” anytime and anywhere,, well it is already happening now and it should just get better and more fun. I would like to see a dose of A.I. in some of the mundane and complex tasks we do, like crosschecking current rules, zoning, codes, that come into play. I would like a computer programmer take a crack at developing a “ArchAI” program that will compile a basic building envelope and create a set of drawings just off say 10 basic inputs or dimensions you give it.

Who / what has been your greatest influence in design? 

Failure.

Which building or project type would you like to work on that you haven’t been part of yet? 

I would love to work on a large community center or cultural icon like the 92Y (92nd Street Y)

How do you hope to inspire / mentor the next generation of Architects?  

You sit with them see what they are doing and ask questions? If there is something good there, progress or talent in a particular direction you help develop that and point them to something that they might find helpful or interesting based on the direction they are already heading in. You might point them in a direction where they might get un-stuck (if they share their sticking point). Then they come back and ask again.  Then the mentoring kind of begins.

What advice would you give aspiring architects (K-12)? College students? Graduates? 

Just keep swimming. Do not be afraid to ask questions. Do not be afraid to fail.

What does Architecture mean to you? 

Every time I get mad at it and curse it for being hard, or impossible it comes back, I see a beautiful building and I just think it’s great and there are so many talented people to watch and buildings to visit. I guess it’s just ingrained in there and I hope I can enjoy it as long as possible.

What is your design process? 

That is a hard question. It really depends. But Testing and Tossing is such a big part. I used to say do not draw more in the first half of the day that you cannot erase in the second half. Of course we don’t have to spend time erasing anymore, so we have more time for flipping stuff on its head and seeing what can be gained. One tries to list, develop or articulate the restraints, constraints and guiderails first so you can get to the design phase. Then the Testing and Tossing begins. I still believe in the old fashioned pin-up in a room and let the criticism flow.

If you could not be an Architect, what would you be? 

The animation thing I guess. It’s never too late to go to Hollywood. Yes it is I think.

What is your dream project?  

The Museum of the Tour de France. It must have views and a fantastic café. And banks of Zwifting set-up’s with a huge High Def screens floating in front of real glazed views.

What advice do you have for a future Executive leader? 

Help others succeed and then encourage and praise, daily if you can. Sit right across or next to someone at their desk for bit, avoid constant big meetings. Smaller ones. You do the leg work the big meeting might have made easier.

What are three key challenges you face as a leader in business today and one trend you see in your industry? 

Technology costs, Marketing. Managing cash flow. I see a trend in larger firms as an umbrella with smaller brands below     

What one thing must an executive leader be able to do to be successful in the next 3 years? 

Listen, stay positive, learn how people do what they do.

What are some executive insights you have gained since you have been sitting in the executive leadership seat – or what is one surprise you have encountered as the world of business continues to morph as we speak?  

Younger people are very creative in the way they work and use software. I think it’s important to “give in” and “give up” the ways one might have done something in the past. Even if those ways worked well before. Be willing to re-prioritize what you thought was important in how projects are realized and mananged.

Final Thoughts on How to Be Successful?   

Keep a sense of humor, laugh and value irony along the way. Take some time to enjoy the journey and not just the finish line. Realize everyone one else is trying to do the same thing, and help whenever you can. Each client is a chance to learn something new.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

Gift Ideas from ILMA


Our Exclusive ILMA Interview with Felicia Middleton @UrbanAesthetics

Felicia Middleton is an Architecture Design Professional, an Author, an EPA Certified Renovator and an Entrepreneur. She is the principal of Urban Aesthetics, LLC serving the Philadelphia metropolitan area.  She specializes in Residential and Commercial Architecture and Interior Design – both Renovations and New Construction – as well as Commercial and Residential Kitchens and Baths, Quality Assurance, Interior Material Specifications, Interior Commercial Design including Restaurants and Bars, Salons and Spas, Education and Church Facilities and Corporate Design and Retail Planning. She also provides Construction Administration and Construction Management services.

She can be found on social media by following these links: Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and on LinkedIn.

ILMA INTERVIEW

When and why did you decide to become an Architect?

At the young age of 15, while attending the Carver H.S. of Engineering and Science I took a drafting class and decided what I wanted to do as a career. I told a drafting teacher that I wanted to draw on computers. We had a drafting teacher who was very encouraging, named Mr. Avant. The students loved him so much because he would let us eat lunch with him in his drafting class and he had a genuine interest in each one of us. Sadly, he passed last year. I always wanted to thank him for his help and encouragement.

What were some of the challenges of achieving your dream?

College financing often was a challenge for me. My family had difficulties and paying for college became a struggle. I had to work many jobs while in college but I realize now that those jobs helped lay the framework for my future. Thank God for making it possible for me to overcome so many obstacles and pursue and achieve my dream.

Any memorable clients or project highlights?

Earlier in my career, I designed a Commissary Kitchen Warehouse and several cafeterias for the Vineland School District in Vineland, NJ. I learned so much from that project. I learned a lot about the operations of school food facilities. That learning process really reinforced how important the use of a building is in design and planning.

During that same time, I worked on many well-known food facility projects in casinos throughout the country. I found a design niche that I grew to love and still love over a decade later.

How does your family support what you do?

My immediate family supports me 100%. Especially my mother. She has been my biggest fan. My friends and family will often pass my name to others who may need my services. In addition, they support events and projects sponsored by my company, especially the community projects.

How do Architects measure success?

Many architects measure success via projects and achievements and the impact that they have on others. I would also add that success is measured by the way we are able to make a difference in our communities.

What matters most to you in design?

Safety, is extremely important to me, also function and aesthetics. Buildings are where we spend the majority of our time so they should be safe spaces that add to our well-being.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

What do you hope to achieve over the next 2 years? 5 years?

Over the next two years I will focus on managing Urban Aesthetics projects while developing my own individual brand. Within 5 years I will have my brand developed in Food Facility Design and operate separately from Urban Aesthetics.

Who is your favorite Architect? Why?

I feel in our profession mentoring and inspiring is very important. Your life, work and values should inspire your followers. My favorite historical architect, Daniel Burnham’s life story is inspiring, his buildings are beautiful and he has written very inspiring quotes. I have used his quote as a motto for my business.

“Make no little plans; they have no magic to stir men’s blood and probably themselves will not be realized. Make big plans; aim high in hope and work, remembering that a noble, logical diagram once recorded will never die, but long after we are gone be a living thing, asserting itself with ever-growing insistency…”

My favorite current architects are my colleagues.

Do you have a coach or mentor?

I have a Business Coach but unfortunately, I do not currently have a mentor. I have been blessed with many mentors throughout my life and career and I have mentored many.

Mentoring relationships are not permanent. They end or change as we grow. I have desired to find a mentor for a couple of years but I have not been able to create the relationship.

The architect that I share an office with is probably the closest person to a mentor that I currently have. He is a senior on the architecture profession and he offers advice and gives advice when I ask. I have a great deal of respect for him.

What is your favorite historic and modern (contemporary) project? Why?

My favorite historic project is the Colosseum. The Colosseum is a grand structure located in Rome, Italy. It is beautiful and strong, representing the games that were performed for spectators. Amazingly, it has stood robust and tall for almost 2000 years.

My favorite modern building has changed a many ties over the last 20 years, as innovation, design and the environment surrounding me changes. Most recently, the Cira Center, in Philadelphia, has been a favorite. I love it because it stands a jewel above the surrounding buildings and it represented the expansion of our downtown to the other side of the Schuylkill River. An added bonus is that the building is green, LEED Certified.

Where do you see the profession going over the next few decades?

For a while, it seemed as if there was a decline in the profession but I have noticed a recent resurgence. I do believe there needs to be some liberation in the process involved in becoming an architect and function within the profession. I see the profession opening up to multiple careers, interchanging with architecture.

What type of technology do you see in the design and construction industries?

Virtual 3d Modeling is a form of technology that I have seen most recently. Virtual reality in design will help us communicate designs to clients who have difficulty understanding plans. In addition, advances in project management software helps to streamline the planning and construction processes.

Who / what has been your greatest influence in design?

The Green Movement has been my greatest influence in design. I became serious about environmental issues while in college and there I decided that it would have a big impact on my work. I worked for an environmental organization for a couple of years while in college and I learned so much. I added a few environment-centered courses while in college and

my senior internship included researching Brownfield’s Redevelopment. When I first entered the design world, eco-friendly design was not a large part of what we did. I was a bit discouraged at first but was reenergized in the early 2000’s when the green movement really started taking shape.

Which building or project type would you like to work on that you haven’t been part of yet?

A LEED project. My current burning desire is to participate on a LEED project.

How do you hope to inspire / mentor the next generation of Architects?

I will to continue mentoring our young people by explaining to them as many aspects of our work as I can, to help the understand all that is included and let them see that this profession has so much to offer, depending on what direction you wish to go. I will let them see that when you fall in love with your work, it can be very fulfilling. I hope to let them see that you can make a difference in your community and also the world while working in this field but you MUST find your way.

What advice would you give aspiring architects (K-12)? College students? Graduates?

Fall in love love with architecture and the profession if you want to succeed and endure the work. You will have to put your time in while working but be sure to learn more than what is expected.

What does Architecture mean to you?

Architecture is art in the form of function and use. We create structures that affect people physically and emotionally. We discover solutions to problems both spatially and creatively. I learned at a young age that I liked seeing how things come together. In architecture, part of your work is to develop the way a building comes together. At times we have to take a building apart to bring the desired project together.

What is your design process?

I follow a basic process:

  • Determining the client’s Gain an understanding of their situation (financial, time constraints and any limitations)
  • Preliminary Research – Code, Zoning, Needs of Use, Property,
  • Pre-Design – Discuss research findings, create
  • Design Development – Develop the concept into a more workable Additional research.
  • Coordinate with project team.
  • Complete

If you could not be an Architect, what would you be?

If I could not work in this great profession, I would be a writer. I guess I already am a writer. I have always excelled at writing. Writing is my second love, next to architecture. I have published 2 books, written for magazines and published several blogs. I absolutely love to write.

What is your dream project?

I have a strange desire to design a high-end Starbucks, similar to the project in progress in Chicago.

What advice do you have for a future Executive leader?

Take time to let things develop. Relish in the importance of being guided by others, mentors who can help you and your interests. You must share in your success, look to give to your fellow business colleagues. Develop a relationship with fellow business owners and remember that collaboration produces multiple wins. Work with partnerships, strategically develop partners with whom you can develop lasting business relationships.

What are three key challenges you face as a leader in business today and one trend you see in your industry?

Maintaining Momentum is a challenge that requires constant thought and planning. Moving to the next level while continuing a current pace is very important for success.

Keeping the needs of our community in focus while maintaining momentum is important and also challenging.

One trend I have seen in my industry, especially locally is the explosion of development within the inner city. It is similar to the Mc-Mansion boom we saw years ago.

What one thing must an executive leader be able to do to be successful in the next 3 years?

Remain relevant to society, business and your community. Offer a unique service that keeps the client as a focus.

What are some executive insights you have gained since you have been sitting in the executive leadership seat – or what is one surprise you have encountered as the world of business continues to morph as we speak?

I have learned that business is difficult and you have to extract emotion from the process or it will wear you out. I work in a creative profession but often the bottom line drives my work. I’ve read about and followed the lives of innovative leaders in business to inspire me, geniuses such as Steve Jobs. Although they are one-in-a million I you can be one, I can make a difference. I strive to learn as much as you can from these leaders, both good and bad and use their tools in my work.

Shark Tank may be entertaining but you can learn a lot watching that show. Learn where you can. Never stop educating yourself. Follow the rules.

A surprise I have encountered is the number of opportunities that are available for current and future business owners.

Final Thoughts on How to Be Successful?

Read as much as you can. Keep learning. Be honest, thankful and give back as much as possible. Follow the rules. To me, true success, being able to use the resources that you’ve been blessed with to bless someone else. Whether it is with your money, labor, knowledge, time, mentoring, etc.

For more exclusive ILMA interviews click here.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

Christmas Gift Ideas from ILMA


HOT & Sensational “Sentosa House” with COOL Design Details by Nicholas Burns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Architects: Nicholas Burns
Location: Sentosa Island,  Year: 2012
All Photographs: Patrick Bingham-Hall
Content/Article/Photo Source: “Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns” 04 Dec 2012. ArchDaily.

A series of open spaces clustered against the core. The core provides, structure, vertical circulation, services and adjacent has all baths and the kitchen maximising efficiency.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Adaptable space, these open spaces and freed from pre determined function, the structure is designed to allow reconfiguration to future needs, walls can be erected where required.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Materials are chosen for their inherent qualities. Recycled golden teak, fair faced concrete, stone and steel all offer duality of function. Their richness and texture provides the decorative element.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Structure, the bones of the house are on display creating clear open space with a sense of seamlessness interconnecting with the gardens and landscape, framing views. The structural grid provides a logic, an order with which every element and detail diminishing in scale relates to and relies on.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Detail, details are painstakingly distilled and resolved, nothing is left undone. The intention is the create an ease, a wholeness, a stillness…a sense of timelessness….

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Experience, the journey through the house is one of wholeness with distinct parts offering a layered and complex series of experiences. Enclosure and compression expands to openness, the contrasts emphasis the feeling of space. Views are framed, and vary in scale, sometimes intimate and close into a court, other times expanding into borrowed landscape of the jungle and out to distant vistas.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Environment, the house is designed for the tropical climate. The recycled teak screen and desk fits over the concrete structure and glazing protecting it from the sun allowing the thermal mass of the concrete to stabilise the internal temperature. Cross ventilation, the other critical element of tropical design is maximises, the glass openness allowing even slight breezes to freely flow throughout he house creating a level of comfort. On the mechanical side, the climate control is the energy efficient aided by double glazing. The hot water is heated using a heat pump, utilising the free heat form the air and then circulated so hot water is available at taps with wasting water. Materials are reduced, the structure is exposed. The structural design using flat slabs reduces concrete usage by 25%. All of the timber is recycled. All of the materials are chosen to minimise surface treatments and unnecessary materials.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Landscape, the landscape uses species that suit the climate, that thrive with minimal intervention. The rear area merges with the jungle enhancing the element of borrowed landscape

  
 Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-HallSentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall

“From Now To How: Social, Virtual and Cross Generational Leadership” by Exec Coach & Trainer @JustCoachIt

by Guest Blogger, Irene Becker
First woman CEO of a steel company in Canada, Irene Becker has a track record of trailblazing accomplishments in business and in the community at large. Irene is an inspiring executive coach, speaker and writer whose R-E-A-C-H methodology and 3Q focus has helped clients achieve breakthrough results in their careers, communication, leadership and lives. Passionate about the integrity of her work, Irene is dedicated to helping change-makers LEAD forward at the speed of change.

Leadership Balance

You can criticize, condemn and complain or imagine, inspire and innovate. Your choice will determine your destiny. – Deepak Chopra

The need to go from NOW to HOW is critical. Leadership starts with our ability to imagine, inspire, innovate and communicate forward.

Hope lies in not simply playing to strengths, but to seizing every challenge, change, stressor and failure as an opportunity to grow, evolve and expand the power of our minds, the strength of our brains and the capacity of our hearts.

Courage lies in our ability develop a whole new mind set, skill set and heart set that optimizes the unbridled passion, purpose and potential of humans to do better, rather than simply living or working faster than ever before.

Strength lies in finding a common language, a common message that touches the heads, hearts and mind of many. A message that transcends social, ethnic, virtual and cross generational lines because it speaks to the purpose that unites us all.

Leadership starts with our ability to imagine, inspire, innovate and communicate forward.

Leaders must be purpose driven because purpose equals profit on a multiplicity of levels. If your employees, your team, your constituents do not feel that the work they do, the contribution they make, is purposeful they will never optimize or maximize their potential.

If they do not feel that they are an integral part of a bigger picture, a larger goal or a greater team, the engagement, loyalty, transparency of communication and collaboration optimization of engagement and potential will not be achieved.

Similarly, if they do not have access to resources that help them learn new ways of thinking doing and communicating that enable their greatest potential in the face of change, challenges, complexity and opportunities they cannot lead forward.

Leaders must embrace their ability to go from NOW to HOW by not simply playing to strengths but also to using change, challenges, stressors, even failures to optimize all 3Q’s: IQ (intelligence-focus-ability to learn and re-learn faster and better); EQ (emotional intelligence; self awareness, self management, relationship management, social management, communication); and SQ (values, purpose, integrity).

3Q Leadership strengths are not for the faint of heart. They are instead for those who want to negotiate dark corners, build new bridges among diverse groups and develop communities of purpose and practice that survive and thrive by using strengths, changes and challenges to communicate and lead forward.

Leaders must be excellent listeners, learners and communicators who build bridges across diverse groups, internal and external constituencies. They must build and empower Communities of Purpose where shared objectives, values, purpose and language empowers, engages and sustains actual, social/digital/virtual communication and collaboration.

They must have the courage to negotiate dark unknown corners with courage, hope, faith, integrity and humanity knowing that the differences that separate us are inconsequential in relation to the common human bond and purpose that unites us.

They must have the communication skills to find the message, the sound bite that opens the ears, heads, hearts and minds of all, irrespective of race, creed, gender or generational age. They must be leaders who learn, re-learn and fail forward faster and better than ever before by developing real and virtual/social communities of purpose.

Leaders must be excellent listeners, learners and communicators who build bridges across diverse groups, internal and external constituencies.

The need to go from NOW to HOW is critical. Leadership starts with our ability to imagine, inspire, innovate and communicate forward. It means embracing our ability to learn, re-learn, imagine, inspire and innovate by championing the mental, emotional agility and consistency of united purpose and integrity that can help us use what is to create what can be in ourselves, our people, our organizations…our world.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
I.LM.A. Team
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


The TEN “Demandments” of Architecture by @WJMArchitect

Many architects feel like their devotion to the practice of architecture is like worship of a secular religion.

Here’s a little fun with our secular religion…

The TEN Demandments of Architecture
by William J. Martin, Architect

ILMA-Moses-02

  1.  Thou shalt have no clients before thee…
  2.  Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven 3D cadd images.
  3.  Thou shalt not take thy name of thy clients or thy engineers in vain.
  4.  Remember thy project deadline day, and  keep it holy.
  5.  Honor thy computer and thy coffee: that thy days may be long.
  6.  Thou shalt not kill thy design critics…
  7.  Thou shalt not commit building design insultery.
  8.  Thou shalt not steel, unless wood or masonry doesn’t support thy design.
  9.  Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy building inspector official.
  10.  Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s contractors…

ILMA-Moses-01

These are only the TEN Demandments, maybe you can think of a few more.  Leave a comment and let us know !

Also Check Out These Great Posts:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Forget Blueprints, Now You Can Print the Building

Architect to build home using 3-D printer

By Doug Gross, CNN
"Landscape House" will be built from blocks made with a 3-D printer, says its creator, Dutch architect Janjaap Ruijssenaars.
“Landscape House” will be built from blocks made with a 3-D printer, says its creator, Dutch Architect Janjaap Ruijssenaars.

(CNN) — A Dutch architect is thinking a little bigger about 3-D printing than the tiny-to-midsize trinkets we’ve seen so far.

He wants to print a house. And a pretty offbeat and innovative one at that.

“Landscape House” is the brainchild of architect Janjaap Ruijssenaars. He describes it as “one surface folded in an endless Mobius band,” or sort of a giant figure 8. According to its creator, walking through its continuous looping design will seamlessly merge indoors and outdoors in an effort to model nature itself.

The house would cost between $5 million and $6 million, according to the BBC, and there’s already been interest expressed by museums, private individuals and others, according to Ruijssenaars. He told the network that someone in Brazil plans to buy one to display native art he’s found in a nearby national park.

All that would be innovative enough on its own. But to take it a step further, the architect plans to build “Landscape House” using the emerging technology of 3-D printing.

The woman who wants to ‘print’ buildings

Commercially available models like the MakerBot aren’t exactly up to the task. This requires a printer of enormous size. And Ruijssenaars found one in the D-Shape.

Described as a “mega-scale free form printer” by its makers, the massive aluminum structure uses sand, which it forms back into a material that’s like marble.

For “Landscape House,” it will be used to print out blocks that are about 20 feet by 30 feet. Those, along with some fiberglass and concrete reinforcements, will be used to create the building.

“3D printing is amazing,” Ruijssenaars told the BBC. “For me as an architect it’s been a nice way to construct this specific design — it has no beginning and no end, and with the 3-D printer we can make it look like that.”

He says his first “Landscape House” is expected to be completed by the end of 2014.

3-D printer-01 3-D printer-02 3-D printer-03 3-D printer-04 3-D printer-05

Are you ready to buy yours? Click Here And Click Here

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


My 10 All-Time Favorite Architecture Books by @FrankCunhaIII plus a BONUS Book (Updated with Video & Audio Track)

Audio Version:

https://soundcloud.com/frank-cunha-iii/my-top-10-architecture-books

These are my top Architecture books to read:

(#10)

A History of Architecture: Settings and Rituals
By Spiro Kostof

(#9)

Architecture and Disjunction
By Bernard Tschumi

(#8)

Delirious New York: A Retroactive Manifesto for Manhattan
By Rem Koolhaas

(#7)

Intertwining
By Steven Holl

(#6)

Learning from Las Vegas – Revised Edition: The Forgotten Symbolism of Architectural Form
By Robert Venturi, Steven Izenour, Denise Scott Brown

(#5)

S M L XL
Rem Koolhaas

(#4)

The Space of Encounter
By Daniel Libeskind

(#3)

Ten Books on Architecture
By Vitruvius

(#2)

Towards a New Architecture
By Le Corbusier

(#1)

A Field Guide to American Houses: The Definitive Guide to Identifying and Understanding America’s Domestic Architecture
By Virginia Savage McAlester

BONUS!

Mask of Medusa
By John Hejduk

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

 


Not ready to start using Building Information Modeling? Try AutoCAD 2013 Free Trial

Not ready to start using Building Information Modeling?

Autodesk provides several native Mac products for 3D modeling, rendering, and animation, visual effects, and digital imagery.

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Design and shape the world around you with AutoCAD® for Mac® software. Explore your ideas and share data seamlessly while working in a native Mac environment.
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  • Unlock the power of AutoCAD when used as a part of AutoCAD Design Suite, the optimal solution to create and showcase your designs

Free Trial Details

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FAQs

What are some of the new features of AutoCAD 2013?
The latest AutoCAD version offers new tools for design aggregation, connectivity with Autodesk 360 cloud computing platform, and access to hundreds of apps.
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What are the key capabilities of AutoCAD Design Suite?
AutoCAD Design Suite enables you to do more with AutoCAD software with tools to capture scanned documents, sketch design concepts, and showcase designs with amazing 3D renderings.
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How do I know which AutoCAD Design Suite is for me?
AutoCAD Design Suite is available in three editions—standard, premium, and ultimate—to fit your workflow. Compare the functionality of each edition.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


What is BIM?

What is BIM?

BIM stands for Building Information Modeling. It is not a technology but a culmination of different concepts and technologies that come together in one central package.

Architects & Designers:
“Either upgrade from 2-D drawing to BIM now or get left behind.”

How is BIM different than CAD? 

Many people who first see the concept of BIM may just shrug it off as nothing more than a different version of CAD software. BIM is to CAD is what CAD was to hand drafting.  Because both BIM and CAD are computer based the difference on first glance is not easily recognizable.

In using CAD, we are essentially drawing the same way we did on paper – in two dimensions.  The only difference is that now the drawings are electronic and easier to manipulate and reproduce.  We can move entire walls with a few clicks of the mouse where as on paper the entire sheet had to be redrawn.  This drastically speeds up the process but also creates some challenges as well.

For example:

In CAD, as easy as it is to move a wall, it is also just as easy to move it to the wrong spot – creating its own set of coordination issues.

With BIM, the design team does not draw in 2D and we do not need to draw traditional floor plans, sections, elevations.  Instead, you create a full 3D model of your entire building, complete with walls, floors, doors, concrete, steel, etc exactly how you want it to be built in the real world.  Then you tell the computer what drawings you want generated from this central Building Information Model.  If you want a section, simply draw a section line and the program will understand that you want a section cut at that point.  The beauty of this is that when you move walls or change floor to floor dimensions that particular aspect of the building model is automatically updated.  If your client wants to know updated square footage totals, you don’t need to add up anything manually – this information is built into the model and is simple to extract.  Instead of the contractor estimating how much concrete the building contains you can tell him how much.

How much does BIM cost?

This depends on how your firm decides to implement Building Information Modeling.  We actually already have BIM – it is built into Autocad Architecture that we are currently using and have many licenses of.  Unfortunately, we are not using the program anywhere near its full capacity, only bits and pieces of BIM functionality.  Although we have CAD standards, we don’t have all of the standards put in place for BIM.

Where do we start?

There are a few different ways to implement BIM into our current practices.  Many companies have begun to do so with various methods and levels of success.

Method 1 – Software Training.  
This would involve people from a consulting company coming in and giving us presentations on how to use the software.  In addition, we would have people go through exercises on their own computers.

Recommendation: Because of the nature of BIM, with the multitude of options it provides, this is not the best solution.  It is simply too much to take in a few training sessions.

Method 2 – Project Based. 

Method two would involve using our current software but picking a project to use it on and make an effort from the start to specifically make that project a complete BIM.  There would have to a member of the team that was more adept at the software that would assist in implementing it throughout the process.  This person could be a trained employee or an outside consultant.

Recommendation:

Method 3 – New Software.

Ultimately, Autocad Architecture will be phased out over the next few years.  Replacing it with true BIM software packages such as Autodesk REVITArchiCADVectorworks or Digital Project (CATIA) will be the next logical step.  The choice to move to one of these packages should be analyzed based on the type of work we are doing, the monetary investment we are willing to make, and how we go about phasing in the software.  Once one of these software packages are chosen, we can then use a new project as the basis for learning the software similar to Method 2.

Recommendation:

The Firm Model – Doing what is good for the Client, Company, Office, and Employees. 

Client

BIM helps the client by producing a more accurate set of construction documents.  Estimating is far more accurate and fewer change orders will occur.

Company and Office
BIM has been shown to produce documents that have far less coordination issues than standard CAD drawings, projects have faster turn around time, and design changes are easy to implement at any stage.

Employees 
If we want to attract the best people and create effective project teams, having the right tools for the job is important.

Conclusion:

Either upgrade from 2-D drawing to BIM now or get left behind.

Download a free sample by clicking on the links below:

REVIT

ArchiCAD

Vectorworks

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


REVIT 2013

System Requirements

For Autodesk Revit 2013, Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013, Autodesk Revit MEP 2013, Autodesk Revit Structure 2013

Minimum: Entry-Level Configuration

Description Requirement
Operating System* Microsoft® Windows®7 32-bit

  • Enterprise
  • Ultimate
  • Professional
  • Home Premium

Microsoft® Windows® XP SP2 (or later)

  • Professional
  • Home
Browser Microsoft® Internet Explorer® 7.0 (or later)
CPU Type Single- or Multi-Core Intel® Pentium®, Xeon®, or i-Series processor or AMD® equivalent with SSE2 technology. Highest affordable CPU speed rating recommended.Autodesk® Revit® software products will use multiple cores for many tasks, using up to 16 cores for near-photorealistic rendering operations.
Memory 4 GB RAM

  • Usually sufficient for a typical editing session for a single model up to approximately 100 MB on disk. This estimate is based on internal testing and customer reports. Individual models will vary in their use of computer resources and performance characteristics.
  • Models created in previous versions of Revit software products may require more available memory for the one-time upgrade process.
  • /3GB RAM switch not recommended. Revit software and system stability can be affected by memory conflicts with video drivers when the /3GB switch is active.
Video Display 1,280 x 1,024 with true color
Video Adapter Basic Graphics:
Display adapter capable of 24-bit colorAdvanced Graphics:
DirectX® 10 capable graphics card with Shader Model 3 as recommended by Autodesk.
Hard Disk 5 GB free disk space
Pointing Device MS-Mouse or 3Dconnexion® compliant device
Media Download or installation from DVD9 or USB key
Connectivity Internet connection for license registration and prerequisite component download

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Value: Balanced Price and Performance

Description Requirement
Operating System* Microsoft Windows 7 64-bit

  • Enterprise
  • Ultimate
  • Professional
  • Home Premium
Browser Internet Explorer 7.0 (or later)
CPU Type Multi-Core Intel Xeon, or i-Series processor or AMD equivalent with SSE2 technology. Highest affordable CPU speed rating recommended.Revit products will use multiple cores for many tasks, using up to 16 cores for near-photorealistic rendering operations.
Memory 8 GB RAM

  • Usually sufficient for a typical editing session for a single model up to approximately 300 MB on disk. This estimate is based on internal testing and customer reports. Individual models will vary in their use of computer resources and performance characteristics.
  • Models created in previous versions of Revit software products may require more available memory for the one-time upgrade process.
Video Display 1,680 x 1,050 with true color
Video Adapter DirectX® 10 capable graphics card with Shader Model 3 as recommended by Autodesk.
Hard Disk 5 GB free disk space
Pointing Device MS-Mouse or 3Dconnexion compliant device
Media Download or installation from DVD9 or USB key
Connectivity Internet connection for license registration and prerequisite component download

Back to top

Performance: Large, Complex Models

Description Requirement
Operating System* Microsoft Windows 7 64-bit

  • Enterprise
  • Ultimate
  • Professional
  • Home Premium
Browser Internet Explorer 7.0 (or later)
CPU Type Multi-Core Intel Xeon, or i-Series processor or AMD equivalent with SSE2 technology. Highest affordable CPU speed rating recommended.Revit products will use multiple cores for many tasks, using up to 16 cores for near-photorealistic rendering operations.
Memory 16 GB RAM

  • Usually sufficient for a typical editing session for a single model up to approximately 700 MB on disk. This estimate is based on internal testing and customer reports. Individual models will vary in their use of computer resources and performance characteristics.
  • Models created in previous versions of Revit software products may require more available memory for the one-time upgrade process.
Video Display 1,920 x 1,200 or higher with true color
Video Adapter DirectX 10 capable graphics card with Shader Model 3 as recommended by Autodesk.
Hard Disk
  • 5 GB free disk space
  • 10,000+ RPM (for Point Cloud interactions)
Pointing Device MS-Mouse or 3Dconnexion compliant device
Media Download or installation from DVD9 or USB key
Connectivity Internet connection for license registration and prerequisite component download

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For Autodesk Revit Server 2013

Description Requirement
Operating System
  • Microsoft® Windows Server® 2008 64-bit
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 64-bit
Web Server Microsoft® Internet Information Server 7.0 (or later)
< 100 Concurrent Users
(multiple models)
Minimum Value Performance
CPU Type 4+ cores
2.6 GHz+
6+ cores
2.6 GHz+
6+ cores
3.0 GHz+
Memory 4 GB RAM 8 GB RAM 16 GB RAM
Hard Drive 7,200+ RPM 10,000+ RPM 15,000+ RPM
100 + Concurrent Users
(multiple models)
Minimum Value Performance
CPU Type 4+ cores
2.6 GHz+
6+ cores
2.6 GHz+
6+ cores
3.0 GHz+
Memory 8 GB RAM 16 GB RAM 32 GB RAM
Hard Drive 10,000+ RPM 15,00+ RPM High-Speed RAID Array
100 + Concurrent Users
(multiple models)
VMware® and Hyper-V® Support (See Revit Server Administrator’s Guide)

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Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013 for Citrix **
Autodesk Revit MEP 2013 for Citrix **
Autodesk Revit Structure 2013 for Citrix **

Description Requirement
Citrix System
  • XenApp® 6.0 or 6.5
  • Citrix® License Manager
  • Citrix® Profile Manager
Authentication
  • Microsoft® Active Directory
    • Roaming Profiles supported
License Server Dedicated Autodesk license server for session-specific licenses
Client OS
  • Microsoft Windows XP SP2 (or later)
  • Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64 Edition SP2
  • Microsoft Windows 7 32-bit
  • Microsoft Windows 7 64-bit
Client Browser
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 7 (or later)
User Access Client computers should be bound to the network domain. Each client computer should have either the full Citrix® or web client plug-in installed. Users should use their domain logins to access both the Citrix web console and the LAN.

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*Learn more about using Autodesk® Revit® Architecture 2013, Autodesk® Revit® MEP 2013, Autodesk® Revit® Structure 2013, and Autodesk Revit® 2013 software with Boot Camp®, part of Mac OS® X that enables you to install and run Microsoft Windows (and Windows-based applications) on a Mac® computer or with Parallels Desktop®, a system utility available from Parallels, Inc. that enables you to run applications in each operating system without restarting your computer.

**Revit Architecture 2013, Revit MEP 2013, and Revit Structure 2013 software products are Citrix Ready™ Applications. Disclaimer: The Citrix application is network-based and performance of Autodesk Citrix Ready Applications may vary with network performance. These Autodesk Revit software products do not include the Citrix application, nor does Autodesk provide direct support for issues with the Citrix application. Users should contact Citrix directly with questions related to procurement and operation of the Citrix application.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


What is BIM? Should Your Firm Upgrade? by @FrankCunhaIII

What is BIM?

BIM stands for Building Information Modeling. It is not a technology but a culmination of different concepts and technologies that come together in one central package.

Architects & Designers:
“Either upgrade from 2-D drawing to BIM now or get left behind.”

How is BIM different than CAD? 

Many people who first see the concept of BIM may just shrug it off as nothing more than a different version of CAD software. BIM is to CAD is what CAD was to hand drafting.  Because both BIM and CAD are computer based the difference on first glance is not easily recognizable.

In using CAD, we are essentially drawing the same way we did on paper – in two dimensions.  The only difference is that now the drawings are electronic and easier to manipulate and reproduce.  We can move entire walls with a few clicks of the mouse where as on paper the entire sheet had to be redrawn.  This drastically speeds up the process but also creates some challenges as well.

For example:

In CAD, as easy as it is to move a wall, it is also just as easy to move it to the wrong spot – creating its own set of coordination issues.

With BIM, the design team does not draw in 2D and we do not need to draw traditional floor plans, sections, elevations.  Instead, you create a full 3D model of your entire building, complete with walls, floors, doors, concrete, steel, etc exactly how you want it to be built in the real world.  Then you tell the computer what drawings you want generated from this central Building Information Model.  If you want a section, simply draw a section line and the program will understand that you want a section cut at that point.  The beauty of this is that when you move walls or change floor to floor dimensions that particular aspect of the building model is automatically updated.  If your client wants to know updated square footage totals, you don’t need to add up anything manually – this information is built into the model and is simple to extract.  Instead of the contractor estimating how much concrete the building contains you can tell him how much.

How much does BIM cost?

This depends on how your firm decides to implement Building Information Modeling.  We actually already have BIM – it is built into Autocad Architecture that we are currently using and have many licenses of.  Unfortunately, we are not using the program anywhere near its full capacity, only bits and pieces of BIM functionality.  Although we have CAD standards, we don’t have all of the standards put in place for BIM.

Where do we start?

There are a few different ways to implement BIM into our current practices.  Many companies have begun to do so with various methods and levels of success.

Method 1 – Software Training. 
This would involve people from a consulting company coming in and giving us presentations on how to use the software.  In addition, we would have people go through exercises on their own computers.

Recommendation: Because of the nature of BIM, with the multitude of options it provides, this is not the best solution.  It is simply too much to take in a few training sessions.

Method 2 – Project Based. 

Method two would involve using our current software but picking a project to use it on and make an effort from the start to specifically make that project a complete BIM.  There would have to a member of the team that was more adept at the software that would assist in implementing it throughout the process.  This person could be a trained employee or an outside consultant.

Recommendation:

Method 3 – New Software.

Ultimately, Autocad Architecture will be phased out over the next few years.  Replacing it with true BIM software packages such as Autodesk REVIT, ArchiCAD, Vectorworks or Digital Project (CATIA) will be the next logical step.  The choice to move to one of these packages should be analyzed based on the type of work we are doing, the monetary investment we are willing to make, and how we go about phasing in the software.  Once one of these software packages are chosen, we can then use a new project as the basis for learning the software similar to Method 2.

Recommendation:

The Firm Model – Doing what is good for the Client, Company, Office, and Employees. 

Client

BIM helps the client by producing a more accurate set of construction documents.  Estimating is far more accurate and fewer change orders will occur.

Company and Office
BIM has been shown to produce documents that have far less coordination issues than standard CAD drawings, projects have faster turn around time, and design changes are easy to implement at any stage.

Employees
If we want to attract the best people and create effective project teams, having the right tools for the job is important.

Conclusion:

Either upgrade from 2-D drawing to BIM now or get left behind.

Download a free sample by clicking on the links below:

REVIT

ArchiCAD

Vectorworks

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Exeter Library by Louis Kahn

The Phillips Exeter Academy Library in Exeter, New Hampshire, U.S., with 160,000 volumes on nine levels and a shelf capacity of 250,000 volumes, is the largest secondary school library in the world. It is part of the Phillips Exeter Academy, an independent boarding school.

When it became clear in the 1950s that the library had outgrown its existing building, the school initially hired an architect who proposed a traditional design for the new building. Deciding instead to construct a library with a contemporary design, the school gave the commission to Louis Kahn in 1965. In 1997 the library received the Twenty-five Year Award from the American Institute of Architects, an award that recognizes architecture of enduring significance that is given to no more than one building per year.

Kahn structured the library in three concentric square rings. The outer ring, which is built of load-bearing brick, includes all four exterior walls and the library carrel spaces immediately inside them. The middle ring, which is built of reinforced concrete, holds the heavy book stacks. The inner ring is a dramatic atrium with enormous circular openings in its walls that reveal several floors of book stacks.

Footage from “The Third & The Seventh” project for illustrating Mundos Digitales 2009 conference using 3dsmax, Vray, AE and Premiere.

Main theme soundtrack it’s The Divine Comedy’s “Laika’s Theme” from “Absent Friends” album.



Cold War is Over, Code Wars Just Begining

In the United States, we are Internet dependent. Our financial systems, power grids, telecommunications, water supplies, flight controls and military communications are all online – making them vulnerable to countless attacks by cyber criminals. The goal could be a 10-minute blackout, an attack on our national security, a stock trading glitch or the theft of millions of dollars worth of intellectual property. The FBI has recently made cyber crime a number one priority, one that costs the U.S. an estimated trillion dollars a year. CNBC’s “Code Wars”, hosted by Melissa Lee, takes you onto the frontlines of the war on cyber. Cyber attacks are almost impossible to trace, making cyber crime and acts of cyber warfare the ultimate anonymous crime. So how do we protect our systems whose components are largely manufactured abroad? Can our nation’s infrastructure be protected from cyber attacks? And how can the U.S. win a war in which conventional rules of combat do not apply? CNBC tackles the tough questions in “Code Wars: America’s Cyber Threat.”  Click here to watch the Preview.


BUSINESS WEEK —
In the early morning hours of May 24, an armed burglar wearing a ski mask broke into the offices of Nicira Networks, a Silicon Valley startup housed in one of the countless nondescript buildings along Highway 101. He walked past desks littered with laptops and headed straight toward the cubicle of one of the company’s top engineers. The assailant appeared to know exactly what he wanted, which was a bulky computer that stored Nicira’s source code. He grabbed the one machine and fled. The whole operation lasted five minutes, according to video captured on an employee’s webcam. Palo Alto Police Sergeant Dave Flohr describes the burglary as a run-of-the-mill Silicon Valley computer grab. “There are lots of knuckleheads out there that take what they can and leave,” he says. But two people close to the company say that they, as well as national intelligence investigators now looking into the case, suspect something more sinister: a professional heist performed by someone with ties to China or Russia. The burglar didn’t want a computer he could sell on Craigslist. He wanted Nicira’s ideas.  Click here to read the rest of the story by Michael Riley and Ashlee Vance.

Cyber Weapons: The New Arms Race

The Pentagon, the IMF, Google, and others have been hacked. It’s war out there, and a cyber-weapons industry is exploding to arm the combatants


DE_PLO / dEEP Architects

[Reposted] MAR 16, 2011 by by Sebastian Jordana

Courtesy of AN_D

In view of the earthquake in Japan, dEEP wants to share their early design proposal called ‘DE_PLO’. It’s a research based design proposal by Li Daode from , cooperated with architects Ana Cocho Bermejo and Andrea Balducci Caste. More images and architect’s description after the break.


Courtesy of AN_D

DE_PLO developed as a contemporary response to global disaster cenario relief. The World Health Organization indicates natural disasters and other unpredictable events are so common today that we must urgently devise responses before they can occur. Architects are asked to invent new kinds of highly adaptable and rapidly deployed spaces for different emergencies.

Our proposal engages the necessity to design flexible and adaptable systems that are able to negotiate the uncertainty of disaster relief. Through an in-depth analysis of post catastrophic scenario based case studies we identified patterns that assisted in developing a range of organization logics that could be implemented on site. Through the development of simple pattern cutting and clipping systems we transformed flat sheet material in complex three-dimensional spatial structures. The results are an original piece of research that poses an alternative model to existing methods of response through a carefully studied and crafted proposal.


Courtesy of AN_D

An Emergency Intermediate Health System, with a customized interface, is able to satisfy most medical needs in the shortest time in a broad span of locations. A time-based system, it operates through two kinds of units: Basic triage – A quickly deployable pack ready to be sent immediately after the disaster. Its use is limited in duration, so it focuses on the acute phase. It is usable as an adaptable triage or first-aid unit working alone or with an existing damaged or overcrowded health care facility.

Specific health – Different rapidly deployable units can be customized according to the kind of emergency through an interface-based design. The unit responds to specific spaces and needs, so it is a completely integrated system, able to adapt to specific diseases, spatial and technological needs, and to form/perform as a field hospital.


Courtesy of AN_D

The EIHS is a deployable 3D structure generated from a flat surface, able to arrive directly from the factory to the site, perfectly packaged and ready for easy and quick assembly. A Multilayered Membrane Intelligent System is applied differently for both packs but is based in the same logic.

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Do you like this post? you can read more about: Structures

Cite:
Jordana , Sebastian . “DE_PLO / dEEP Architects” 16 Mar 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed 17 Mar 2011. <http://www.archdaily.com/120301&gt;


An Ode to a Rose

Click here for 02-13-2011-Rose-DSC_3944-FINAL

Saint Valentine is the name of several martyred saints of ancient Rome. The name “Valentine”, derived from valens (worthy, strong, powerful), was popular in Late Antiquity. Of the Saint Valentine whose feast is on February 14th, nothing is known except his name and that he was buried at the Via Flaminia north of Rome on February 14th. It is even uncertain whether the feast of that day celebrates only one saint or more saints of the same name. For this reason this liturgical commemoration was not kept in the Catholic calendar of saints for universal liturgical veneration as revised in 1969. But “Martyr Valentinus the Presbyter and those with him at Rome” remains in the list of saints proposed for veneration by all Catholics. More: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Valentine