[Repost] Futurist Thomas Frey Makes Predictions About Our Children’s Future #ilmaBlog #Children #Futurism #Technology #Innovation #STEM #Education #2040

Understanding the future through the eyes of a child: 29 insane predictions and why it matters?

by  | Mar 6, 2019 | Predictions

Last week my grandson Raymund turned 5 years old, and it caused me to think about the kind of world he’ll be entering into.

The workforce of tomorrow will need to be resilient, flexible, resourceful, creative problem solvers, ethical, epithetical, situationally aware, perseverant, purpose-driven, relentless, and totally distraction-proof. Yes, somehow they need to be distraction-proof.

As I started writing down a list of future attributes, the last one – distraction-proof – has become a recurring theme in most of my thinking. Most of today’s children are the complete opposite of distraction-proof. In fact, I would go so far as to say they have a squirrel phobia. If they haven’t gotten distracted in the last 10 seconds they’ll start wondering if something is wrong.

Training someone to have extreme focus, with the ability to block out all bright shiny objects, is not only a tall order; it’s also a topic that virtually no one is teaching.

In my way of thinking, it’s ok to push future generations towards things we ourselves struggle with, because the demands of the future will be far more intense for them!

The future will require they be better at virtually everything – smarter, quick to adapt, high energy, work long hours, durable, and much more resilient when things go wrong. Yet we’ve been doing just the opposite, instilling a sense of frailty, trying to protect them from everything that can possibly go wrong. Keep in mind, a great captain is never made from calm seas.

How will today’s 5-year olds grow into their roles in the future?

In 2040 the life of today’s five-year olds will look far different than they do today.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THE STORY

We would love to hear from you about what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


China’s Electric Buses Save More Diesel Than All Electric Cars Combined #EarthDay2019 #GreenCities #SmartCities #Urban #Cities #Architect #ilmaBlog

Tesla and other electric cars are great for the environment. However, they pale in comparison to electric buses. According to a report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF), electric buses will save an astounding 270,000 barrels of diesel demand in 2019—every single day. The vast majority of electric buses are found in China, where many mega-cities are closing in on 100 percent electric-powered public transport.

Click here to read the rest of the story by Marc Prosser
(Originally posted to Singularity Hub on Apr 22, 2019)

We would love to hear from you about what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


The More You Serve the More You Earn

Friends, I have been thinking more and more how I can add value to the people I serve. I have also been trying to figure out how to scale up what I am currently doing (that which I love), so that I can impact more lives and serve more people. When I came across this Dave Ramsey video I had to share it with my audience. I hope it gives you a different perspective on how we measure our wealth and well-being.

We would love to hear from you about what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


What is the Role of the Architect in the Future of AR Design?

Never before in the modern history of technology has the architect, the designer, been a more important part of technology’s future. Architects have been curating and ideating on the development of ‘place’ for centuries. Gensler covers how they are leveraging AR in the coverage of AI, the Internet of Things, and Cloud computing, and how to design places using game engine technology.

Speaker: Alan Robles of Gensler

Over 24 years exploring the relationship between users and their surroundings, Alan’s been creating experience environments for clients and projects of every scale around the world. In his role at Gensler he explores the opportunities found at the fringes of the design practice, searching for the edges of the play space of each design opportunity.

(Source: bit.ly/visionsummit17)

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Frank Cunha III, Architect published in local newspaper

Follow Us on Facebook & Twitter | Who is Frank Cunha III???

Frank-Cunha-Luso-01-02-2014

Interview by Carmo Pereira of LusoAmericano newspaper.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Have a great weekend!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in CT, DC, DE, FL, MD, NJ, NY, PA, VA.


HOT & Sensational “Sentosa House” with COOL Design Details by Nicholas Burns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Architects: Nicholas Burns
Location: Sentosa Island,  Year: 2012
All Photographs: Patrick Bingham-Hall
Content/Article/Photo Source: “Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns” 04 Dec 2012. ArchDaily.

A series of open spaces clustered against the core. The core provides, structure, vertical circulation, services and adjacent has all baths and the kitchen maximising efficiency.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Adaptable space, these open spaces and freed from pre determined function, the structure is designed to allow reconfiguration to future needs, walls can be erected where required.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Materials are chosen for their inherent qualities. Recycled golden teak, fair faced concrete, stone and steel all offer duality of function. Their richness and texture provides the decorative element.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Structure, the bones of the house are on display creating clear open space with a sense of seamlessness interconnecting with the gardens and landscape, framing views. The structural grid provides a logic, an order with which every element and detail diminishing in scale relates to and relies on.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Detail, details are painstakingly distilled and resolved, nothing is left undone. The intention is the create an ease, a wholeness, a stillness…a sense of timelessness….

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Experience, the journey through the house is one of wholeness with distinct parts offering a layered and complex series of experiences. Enclosure and compression expands to openness, the contrasts emphasis the feeling of space. Views are framed, and vary in scale, sometimes intimate and close into a court, other times expanding into borrowed landscape of the jungle and out to distant vistas.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Environment, the house is designed for the tropical climate. The recycled teak screen and desk fits over the concrete structure and glazing protecting it from the sun allowing the thermal mass of the concrete to stabilise the internal temperature. Cross ventilation, the other critical element of tropical design is maximises, the glass openness allowing even slight breezes to freely flow throughout he house creating a level of comfort. On the mechanical side, the climate control is the energy efficient aided by double glazing. The hot water is heated using a heat pump, utilising the free heat form the air and then circulated so hot water is available at taps with wasting water. Materials are reduced, the structure is exposed. The structural design using flat slabs reduces concrete usage by 25%. All of the timber is recycled. All of the materials are chosen to minimise surface treatments and unnecessary materials.

Photo © Patrick Bingham-Hall

Landscape, the landscape uses species that suit the climate, that thrive with minimal intervention. The rear area merges with the jungle enhancing the element of borrowed landscape

  
 Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-HallSentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall
Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall Sentosa House / Nicholas Burns © Patrick Bingham-Hall

#TEDTALKS: How to Get Your Ideas to Spread

Gehry

In a world of too many options and too little time, our obvious choice is to just ignore the ordinary stuff. Marketing guru Seth Godin spells out why, when it comes to getting our attention, bad or bizarre ideas are more successful than boring ones.

Seth Godin is an entrepreneur and blogger who thinks about the marketing of ideas in the digital age. His newest interest: the tribes we lead. Full bio »

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.