Better Than a Selfie

cels-004-selfiecels-003-have-funEveryone likes to take a selfie (these days).  Only thing better is when someone else takes a selfie some place you helped design and build.

What: Center for Environmental Life Sciences

Where: Montclair State University

Who: Architect ; Photographer ; Builder ; Project Manager

Happy New Year!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook
FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
web: Business / Personal
Licensed in CT, DC, DE, FL, MD, NJ, NY, PA, VA


A Message For My Son

Frankie Jr. and his team had a great football season (10W-2l) this year but had a devastating loss their final game.  After a very strong semi-final game where everything went right, they couldn’t catch the break they needed to win the last game. This is my message for my son and his teammates:

Winning doesn’t make you great. What makes you great is the fire inside your heart. The ability to stay focused on the ultimate prize. The tenacity to stick with it, each and every day. The desire to wake up and start fresh on your new goal. Winning is not letting defeat win. You cannot be defeated unless you give up. Quitters never win, but winners have to learn how to lose to get stronger. Let the fire in your heart burn deep. Let the pain and sorrow of a loss ignite the passion to dig deeper into your body, mind and soul. A victory is short lived but a loss makes you think long and hard during the off-season. Which will you choose? Self loathing, excuses and blame, thinking: is it time to give up? Or will you pick yourself up, dust yourself off and start training to be even better and stronger for the next season? If it is raining or snowing outside and you know your competition is inside having hot cocoa and playing video games, will you join them? Or will you be working on your mental game, working on building a stronger body, making yourself quicker and more agile, learning new plays and studying video of your heroes training and competing. What am I going to do today to help me win tomorrow? Every day you must choose an action, however small or insignificant it may seem, to build towards your ultimate goal on and off the field. Only you can choose. Take the loss and make it work for you. There will be many moments of disappointments in your life. What you decide to do with it is what makes you a winner. Take the emotion and bottle it. Use it when you think you are at the top of your game. Recall the battle that was lost. Take the feeling and ask yourself, can I throw further, can I hit harder, can I run faster? Did I leave anything on the field or did I play with my entire mind, body and soul? Did I give it my all? Battles are practice for life. Life will take you and chew you up and split you out. Are you ready to stop, rebuild, and return bigger, stronger, faster? Or will you let one single moment in life destroy you. Anyone can be a great winner when they have a great game. I want you to be winner by learning how to take a bad game, one moment of disappointment and frustration, and turn that into a little fire that burns in your heart and soul and builds and builds, stronger and stronger, creating a locomotion of desire, passion and motivation to do great things in your life. I believe in you with all my heart. Love, Daddy

 

Momma Tank, big brother, Frank the Tank, little brothers, the Sherman Tanks

  

Winning the Semi-finals. Time to Celebrate!

  

Frankie Jr.— Focused!

  

Frankie Jr.— Strong Hold

  

Frankie Jr.— Making His Move

  

We Are Family — Your Biggest Fans!!!

  

Little Tanks — Your Biggest Fans!!!

  

Little Tanks — Your Biggest Fans!!!

  

Wallkill vs High Point – Finals

  

Frankie Jr.— Making His Move

  

Wallkill vs High Point – Finals

  

Little Tanks — Your Biggest Fans!!!

  

Wallkill vs High Point – Finals

  

Wallkill vs High Point – Finals

  

Wallkill vs High Point – Finals

  

Wallkill vs High Point – Finals

  

We Are Family — Your Biggest Fans!!!

 

Photos by FRANK CUNHA III (2015)

Media: Nikon D90 DSLR

Post Edits: iPhoto, Instagram


Bicycle Photographic Artwork

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Photos by FRANK CUNHA III (2015)
Media: iPhone photo
Post Edits: Snapseed App

 


Fourth of July – Boys Just Wanna Have Fun!!!

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Friday Fun

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Happy “Labor Day” Works Progress Administration Federal Art Project

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Artwork by Frank Cunha III (2013)

The Works Progress Administration (renamed in 1939 as the Work Projects Administration; WPA) was the largest and most ambitious New Deal agency, employing millions of unemployed people (mostly unskilled men) to carry out public works projects, including the construction of public buildings and roads. In much smaller but more famous projects the WPA employed musicians, artists, writers, actors and directors in large arts, drama, media, and literacy projects.[1]
Almost every community in the United States had a new park, bridge or school constructed by the agency. The WPA’s initial appropriation in 1935 was for $4.9 billion (about 6.7 percent of the 1935 GDP), and in total it spent $13.4 billion.

At its peak in 1938, it provided paid jobs for three million unemployed men and women, as well as youth in a separate division, the National Youth Administration. Headed by Harry Hopkins, the WPA provided jobs and income to the unemployed during the Great Depression in the United States. Between 1935 and 1943, the WPA provided almost eight million jobs. Full employment, which emerged as a national goal around 1944, was not the WPA goal. It tried to provide one paid job for all families in which the breadwinner suffered long-term unemployment.

The WPA was a national program that operated its own projects in cooperation with state and local governments, which provided 10%-30% of the costs. WPA sometimes took over state and local relief programs that had originated in the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC) or Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) programs.

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Artwork by Frank Cunha III (2013)

Liquidated on June 30, 1943, as a result of low unemployment due to the worker shortage of World War II, the WPA provided millions of Americans with jobs for 8 years. Most people who needed a job were eligible for at least some of its positions. Hourly wages were typically set to the prevailing wages in each area. But, workers could not be paid for more than 30 hours a week. Before 1940, to meet the objections of the labor unions, the programs provided very little training to teach new skills to workers.

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Artwork by Frank Cunha III (2013)

The Federal Art Project (FAP) was the visual arts arm of the Great Depression-era New Deal Works Progress Administration Federal One program in the United States. It operated from August 29, 1935, until June 30, 1943. Reputed to have created more than 200,000 separate works, FAP artists created posters, murals and paintings. Some works still stand among the most-significant pieces of public art in the country.

The program made no distinction between representational and nonrepresentational art. Abstraction had not yet gained favor in the 1930s and 1940s and, thus, was virtually unsalable. As a result, the program supported such iconic artists as Jackson Pollock before their work could earn them income.

The FAP’s primary goals were to employ out-of-work artists and to provide art for non-federal government buildings: schools, hospitals, libraries, etc. The work was divided into art production, art instruction and art research. The primary output of the art-research group was the Index of American Design, a mammoth and comprehensive study of American material culture.
The FAP was one of a short-lived series of Depression-era visual-arts programs, which included the Section of Painting and Sculpture and the Public Works of Art Project (both of which, unlike the WPA-operated FAP, were operated by the U.S. Department of the Treasury).

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Artwork by Frank Cunha III (2013)

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.

We sincerely appreciate all your comments.If you like this post please share it with friends.

And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in CT, DE, FL, MD NJ, NY, PA


Mount Rushmore

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Artwork by Frank Cunha III (2013)

Mount Rushmore, the President’s Mountain, is located in the Black Hills of South Dakota. It was the brainchild of Doane Robinson, known as the “Father of Mount Rushmore.” His goal was to create an attraction that would draw people from all over the country to his state. Robinson contacted Gutzon Borglum, the sculptor who was working on the monument at Stone Mountain, GA. Borglum met with Robinson during 1924 and 1925. He was the one who identified Mount Rushmore as a perfect location for a grand monument. Robinson worked with John Boland, President Calvin Coolidge, Congressman William Williamson, and Senator Peter Norbeck to gain support in Congress and the funding to proceed.

Congress agreed to match up to $250,000 of funding for the project and created the Mount Rushmore National Memorial Commission. Work began on the project. By 1933, the Mount Rushmore project became part of the National Park Service. Borglum did not like having the NPS oversee the construction. However, he continued to work on the project until his death in 1941. The monument was deemed complete and ready for dedication on October 31, 1941.

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Artwork by Frank Cunha III (2013)

Facts About Mount Rushmore
• Each President’s head is as tall as a six-story building.
• Over 800 million pounds of stone was removed from Mount Rushmore during the construction.
• Workers have to climb 506 steps to reach the top of Mount Rushmore each day to work.
• The president’s noses are 20 feet long, their mouths 18 feet wide, and their eyes are 11 feet across!
• No deaths occurred during the whole period of carving, just a few minor injuries despite the heights they had to deal with and the use of a huge amount of dynamite for construction.
• Thomas Jefferson was originally started on George Washington’s right. However, after 18 months they realized that it was not working. Jefferson’s face was dynamited off and carved on the other side.
• The sculpture cost $989,992.32 to build.
• There is a cave behind the carving called the “Hall of Records.” It was intended to house the story of Mount Rushmore but was never completed due to lack of funding.
• The estimated erosion rate is 1 inch every 10,000 years.
• The designer chose the south-facing slope of this 5,725-foot mountain so that his sculpture would remain in sunlight throughout the day.
• Workers carved 90 percent of the monument with strategically placed charges of dynamite. They shaped the rest of it with air hammers.
• The bust of Washington was dedicated in 1934, followed by those of Jefferson (1936), Lincoln (1937), and Roosevelt (1939).
• While writing the screenplay for director Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest, Ernest Lehman tried—and failed—to scale the monument’s faces.
• In 2005, the memorial received its first and only cleaning when workers spent three weeks removing dirt and lichen.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.

We sincerely appreciate all your comments.If you like this post please share it with friends.

And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in CT, DC, DE, FL, MD NJ, NY, PA