Art Everyone Should Know – Selfies By Vincent van Gogh #ILMA #Art

Before Instagram there was Vincent van Gogh who painted over 30 selfportraits between the years 1886 and 1889. His collection of selfportraits places him among the most prolific self-portraitists of all time. Van Gogh used portraitpainting as a method of introspection, a method to make money and a method of developing his skills as an artist.

Vincent van Gogh (30 March 1853 – 29 July 1890) was a Dutch Post-Impressionist painter who is among the most famous and influential figures in the history of Western art. In just over a decade he created about 2,100 artworks, including around 860 oil paintings, most of them in the last two years of his life. They include landscapes, still lifes, portraits and self-portraits, and are characterised by bold colours and dramatic, impulsive and expressive brushwork that contributed to the foundations of modern art. During his lifetime, he was not commercially successful and his suicide at 37 followed years of mental illness and poverty.

Here are some examples of his selfies:

If any of these are “fakes” please let me know.

We would love to hear from you about what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends.

Feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


What is the Thinking Hand in Architecture (and why we, as architects, must defend the natural slowness and diversity of experience) #ilmaBlog #Discourse #Theory #Architecture #Design

ILMA The Thinking Hand 01

2009 Book, The Thinking Hand written byArchitect Juhani Pallasmaa

In The Thinking Hand, Architect Juhani Pallasmaa reveals the miraculous potential of the human hand. He shows how the pencil in the hand of the artist or architect becomes the bridge between the imagining mind and the emerging image. The book surveys the multiple essences of the hand, its biological evolution and its role in the shaping of culture, highlighting how the hand–tool union and eye–hand–mind fusion are essential for dexterity and how ultimately the body and the senses play a crucial role in memory and creative work. Pallasmaa here continues the exploration begun in his classic work The Eyes of the Skin by further investigating the interplay of emotion and imagination, intelligence and making, theory and life, once again redefining the task of art and architecture through well-grounded human truths.

Pallasmaa notes that, “…architecture provides our most important existential icons by which we can understand both our culture and ourselves. Architecture is an art form of the eye, the hand, the head and the heart. The practice of architecture calls for the eye in the sense of requiring precise and perceptive observation. It requires the skills of the hand, which must be understood as an active instrument of processing ideas in the Heideggeran sense. As architecture is an art of constructing and physical making, its processes and origins are essential ingredients of its very expression…”

Linking art and architecture he continues, “…as today’s consumer, media and information culture increasingly manipulate the human mind through thematized environments, commercial conditioning and benumbing entertainment, art has the mission to defend the autonomy of individual experience and provide an existential ground for the human condition. One of the primary tasks of art is to safeguard the authenticity and independence of human experience.”

Pallasmaa asserts that,

“Confidence in future architecture must be based on the knowledge of its specific task; architects need to set themselves tasks that no one else knows how to imagine. Existential meanings of inhabiting space can be articulated by the art of architecture alone. Thus architecture continues to have a great human task in mediating between the world and ourselves and in providing a horizon of understanding in the human existential condition.

The task of architecture is to maintain the differentiation and hierarchical and qualitative articulation of existential space. Instead of participating in the process of further speeding up the experience of the world, architecture has to slow down experience, halt time, and defend the natural slowness and diversity of experience. Architecture must defend us against excessive exposure, noise and communication. Finally, the task of architecture is to maintain and defend silence. The duty of architecture and art is to survey ideals and new modes of perception and experience, and thus open up and widen the boundaries of our lived world.”

(Source: https://www.wiley.com/en-us/The+Thinking+Hand%3A+Existential+and+Embodied+Wisdom+in+Architecture-p-9780470779293)

We would love to hear from you about what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends.

Feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


ROART Inspired Photographic Artwork by @FrankCunhaIII

Photographs taken on a field trip in New York City with ROART design studio.

The Gottesman Library, Yeshiva University, Amsterdam Ave #5, New York, NY 10033, designed by ROART and 57 WEST, 629 W 57th Street, New York, NY, designed by BIG | Bjarke Ingels Group.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Architect’s Sketchbook – Cape May, NJ (Sketches by @FrankCunhaIII, August 5, 2017)

A few sketches from my brief trip to Cape May after my triathlon race.

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Architect’s Sketchbook – Portugal & Spain (Sketches by @FrankCunhaIII, July 2017)

 


DE CHIRICO

Giorgio de Chirico (July 10, 1888 – 20 November 20, 1978), an Italian artist, who in the years before World War I, founded the scuola metafisica art movement, which profoundly influenced the surrealists. After 1919, he became interested in traditional painting techniques, and worked in a neoclassical or neo-Baroque style, while frequently revisiting the metaphysical themes of his earlier work.
De Chirico is best known for the paintings he produced between 1909 and 1919, his metaphysical period, which are characterized by haunted, brooding moods evoked by their images. At the start of this period, his subjects were still cityscapes inspired by the bright daylight of Mediterranean cities, but gradually he turned his attention to studies of cluttered storerooms, sometimes inhabited by mannequin-like hybrid figures. 

 

   
    
    
    
    
 
  
 
 

In autumn, 1919, De Chirico published an article in Valori Plastici entitled “The Return of Craftsmanship”, in which he advocated a return to traditional methods and iconography. This article heralded an abrupt change in his artistic orientation, as he adopted a classicizing manner inspired by such old masters as Raphael and Signorelli, and became an outspoken opponent of modern art.In the paintings of his metaphysical period, De Chirico developed a repertoire of motifs—empty arcades, towers, elongated shadows, mannequins, and trains among others—that he arranged to create “images of forlornness and emptiness” that paradoxically also convey a feeling of “power and freedom”. According to Sanford Schwartz, De Chirico—whose father was a railroad engineer—painted images that suggest “the way you take in buildings and vistas from the perspective of a train window. His towers, walls, and plazas seem to flash by, and you are made to feel the power that comes from seeing things that way: you feel you know them more intimately than the people do who live with them day by day.”

In 1982, Robert Hughes wrote that De Chirico “could condense voluminous feeling through metaphor and association … In The Joy of Return, 1915, de Chirico’s train has once more entered the city … a bright ball of vapor hovers directly above its smokestack. Perhaps it comes from the train and is near us. Or possibly it is a cloud on the horizon, lit by the sun that never penetrates the buildings, in the last electric blue silence of dusk. It contracts the near and the far, enchanting one’s sense of space. Early de Chiricos are full of such effects. Et quid amabo nisi quod aenigma est? (“What shall I love if not the enigma?”)—this question, inscribed by the young artist on his self-portrait in 1911, is their subtext.”

In this, he resembles his more representational American contemporary, Edward Hopper: their pictures’ low sunlight, their deep and often irrational shadows, their empty walkways and portentous silences creating an enigmatic visual poetry.

For more information on Giorgio de Chirico click here.

  
    
    
 

 

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!
-FRANKCUNHAIII


Bicycle Photographic Artwork

IMG_1626IMG_1627IMG_1631IMG_1622IMG_1621IMG_1620IMG_1623IMG_1625IMG_1629IMG_1624IMG_1632IMG_1628IMG_1630

Photos by FRANK CUNHA III (2015)
Media: iPhone photo
Post Edits: Snapseed App

 


“Art that Everyone Should Know” #3 by @SophiaFine

Friends,

I recently asked my friend Sophia Fine to compile a series of posts of artists and artwork that should be known in every household. 

This is the third in the series…Hope you enjoy it!

Sincerely,
Frank

Read the rest of this entry »


New Art And Poetry By My Friend Karen Glosser @kglosserdesigns

Nature Whispers

Clear skyDeep crystalline blue
Sun, lingering late day warmth
Golden

My mind wanders…
I close my eyes
Pause…
Longing for more summer

Refreshing wind
Gentle rustling above
Eyes open, fiery auburn light
I look up

And Nature whispers,
“It is time to move on…
Look closer…
I have something new to show you.”
KGLosserDesigns

(Photo: Autumn, Afire.  Karen Glosser)

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If you like this post please share it and spread the love.

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Happy “Labor Day” Works Progress Administration Federal Art Project

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Artwork by Frank Cunha III (2013)

The Works Progress Administration (renamed in 1939 as the Work Projects Administration; WPA) was the largest and most ambitious New Deal agency, employing millions of unemployed people (mostly unskilled men) to carry out public works projects, including the construction of public buildings and roads. In much smaller but more famous projects the WPA employed musicians, artists, writers, actors and directors in large arts, drama, media, and literacy projects.[1]
Almost every community in the United States had a new park, bridge or school constructed by the agency. The WPA’s initial appropriation in 1935 was for $4.9 billion (about 6.7 percent of the 1935 GDP), and in total it spent $13.4 billion.

At its peak in 1938, it provided paid jobs for three million unemployed men and women, as well as youth in a separate division, the National Youth Administration. Headed by Harry Hopkins, the WPA provided jobs and income to the unemployed during the Great Depression in the United States. Between 1935 and 1943, the WPA provided almost eight million jobs. Full employment, which emerged as a national goal around 1944, was not the WPA goal. It tried to provide one paid job for all families in which the breadwinner suffered long-term unemployment.

The WPA was a national program that operated its own projects in cooperation with state and local governments, which provided 10%-30% of the costs. WPA sometimes took over state and local relief programs that had originated in the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC) or Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) programs.

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Artwork by Frank Cunha III (2013)

Liquidated on June 30, 1943, as a result of low unemployment due to the worker shortage of World War II, the WPA provided millions of Americans with jobs for 8 years. Most people who needed a job were eligible for at least some of its positions. Hourly wages were typically set to the prevailing wages in each area. But, workers could not be paid for more than 30 hours a week. Before 1940, to meet the objections of the labor unions, the programs provided very little training to teach new skills to workers.

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Artwork by Frank Cunha III (2013)

The Federal Art Project (FAP) was the visual arts arm of the Great Depression-era New Deal Works Progress Administration Federal One program in the United States. It operated from August 29, 1935, until June 30, 1943. Reputed to have created more than 200,000 separate works, FAP artists created posters, murals and paintings. Some works still stand among the most-significant pieces of public art in the country.

The program made no distinction between representational and nonrepresentational art. Abstraction had not yet gained favor in the 1930s and 1940s and, thus, was virtually unsalable. As a result, the program supported such iconic artists as Jackson Pollock before their work could earn them income.

The FAP’s primary goals were to employ out-of-work artists and to provide art for non-federal government buildings: schools, hospitals, libraries, etc. The work was divided into art production, art instruction and art research. The primary output of the art-research group was the Index of American Design, a mammoth and comprehensive study of American material culture.
The FAP was one of a short-lived series of Depression-era visual-arts programs, which included the Section of Painting and Sculpture and the Public Works of Art Project (both of which, unlike the WPA-operated FAP, were operated by the U.S. Department of the Treasury).

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Artwork by Frank Cunha III (2013)

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.

We sincerely appreciate all your comments.If you like this post please share it with friends.

And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in CT, DE, FL, MD NJ, NY, PA


“Art that Everyone Should Know” #2 by @SophiaFine

Friends,

I recently asked my friend Sophia Fine to compile a series of posts of artists and artwork that should be known in every household. 

This is the second in the series…Hope you enjoy it!

Sincerely,
Frank

Read the rest of this entry »


“Art that Everyone Should Know” #1 by @SophiaFine

Friends,

I recently asked my friend Sophia Fine to compile a series of posts of artists and artwork that should be known in every household. 

This is the first in the series…Hope you enjoy it!

Sincerely,
Frank

Read the rest of this entry »


“The Voodoo Priestess of the Sea” Artwork by @FrankCunhaIII Finds a New Home

The Voodoo Priestess of the Sea

VooDooHome

So Flattered – I could not imagine a better home for her 🙂


Click here for some more artwork
 or here: 

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We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in CT, DE, FL, MD NJ, NY, PA.


Post-Minimalist Art by Miya Ando

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Miya Ando is an American post-minimalist artist. She has done most of her works in countries besides the United States. Ando is of half-Japanese and half-Russian heritage and is a descendent of Bizen sword maker Ando Yoshiro Masakatsu. She was raised by sword smiths-turned Buddhist priests in a Buddhist temple in Okayama, Japan and in the redwoods of Santa Cruz, California. After graduating from UC Berkeley with a degree in East Asian Studies, Ando attended Yale University to study Buddhist iconography and imagery before apprenticing at the Hattori Studio in Japan.

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Ando’s work has been featured in solo exhibitions in several U.S. states including New York and California. Ando has also exhibited in France, Australia, England, Germany, and Tokyo, Japan. Ando’s work can be found at Aldrich Contemporary, the Newhouse Center for Contemporary Art, the Byzantine Museum in Greece, and in Chapman University’s private collection.[citation needed]
In 2009, Against the Stream Buddhist Meditation Society commissioned Ando’s piece, “8-Fold Path,” which consists of a grid of four steel square canvases measuring 4 feet each. The work was featured in a July 2009 article for Shambhala Sun for its “meditative” nature and “spiritual” influence. Also in 2009, Ando created “Fiat Lux” (“Let There Be Light”), a grid of 144 individual 5″ x 5″ steel canvasses for the meditation room in Brooklyn’s St. John’s Bread and Life Chapel. Ando was next commissioned by president Jay Davidson of The Healing Place Non Denominational Chapel to produce an installation for its women’s facility. Ando’s forty-foot, phosphorescent-coated steel piece, “Shelter[Meditation 1-2],” collects sunlight during the day and radiates blue at night. Ando’s latest installation commemorates the tenth anniversary of the September 11 attacks on New York City’s Twin Towers. Commissioned by the 9/11 London Project Foundation as a permanent addition to Potters Fields Park in London, England, Ando’s sculpture stands eight meters tall and is crafted from polished World Trade Center steel. Ando has also completed public commissions for Safdi Plaza Realty, the Thanatopolis Exhibition, San Francisco General Hospital, and CalFire. In 2011, Ando worked on commissions for the Haein Art Project in Korea and the Fist Art Foundation in Puerto Rico.

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Ando became an advocate and public ambassador for Element Skateboards’ 2010 International print and media campaign[citation needed] and won the Thanatopolis Special Artist Award and Public Outdoor Commission in 2010. Ando also received grants from the Puffin Foundation and Gilbert Slomowitz Foundation in 2010 and 2011.[citation needed]
Ando donated 100% of sales from her limited edition 2009 series to the Indigo Youth Movement, a non-profit organization that provides art supplies, books, and school supplies to children of the Isithumba village in South Africa. Ando actively participates in a wide variety of philanthropic collaborations to benefit causes ranging from environmental preservation to humanitarian aid.

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Miya Ando currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Ando’s two- and three-dimensional works reference American minimalism and Zen Reductivism in its exploration of reflectivity and luminosity. According to Rural Intelligence, Ando’s “works on steel canvas are post-minimalism at its very best.”

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We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in CT, DE, FL, MD, NJ, NY, PA.


Art And Poetry By My Friend Sophia Fine @SophiaFine

I wanted to share one of my dearest Twitter supporters and friends, Sophia Fine who is a Fine Arts graduate.  She successfully completed her independent studies in Florence, Italy and was recognized and awarded for her contributions to Literature and Drama. Now she is well-respected in the art-community and is involved in various art shows, solo expositions, and selling her original artwork both in America and overseas.  Click here for more on Sophia and how to contact her online if you are interested in her artwork.  Click here for our last ILMA post on Sophia.

AMOURS SOUS LE CIEL  48X60

AMOURS SOUS LE CIEL  48X60
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/A/Amours_Sous_Le_Ciel_Bleu-big.jpg

“Because the blue of day and night is the perfect setting for dreams
and mystery.
Because it is where great adventures begin.
Learn to feel the sky, the wind, and the desire to soar and keep going!”
S.F.

ARDEN MESSENGER  54X54
ARDEN MESSENGER  54X54
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/A/Ardent_Messenger-big.jpg

“Secret life with the same thought:
In our ferocious lives under these skies we desperately want to be loved…
I am airlifted to raging happiness, thrills, and… fears.”  S.F.

Bilderberg

BILDERBERG  48X60
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/B/Bilderberg-big.jpg

” Chock full of lively! They weave magic spells but can also be
mischievously playful! All these thematic fairies daringly
complimenting each other.
I lived with them when they invaded my privacy of thought.
And one by one escaped from Dream to Reality, creating their utopia
and the tangible. Dreams are made of this.
Need not define their abstraction.
Have no control of that.” S,F.

Le Ciel Provocador

LE CIEL PROVOCADOR  48X72
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/L/Le_Ciel_Provocador-big.jpg

“I am shaken under the skies in my essential solitude, running for
cover under the cottony cumuli… intergalactic warriors grouping
against the soft blue that is dotted here and there with balls of
clouds.
I exhale…
Learn to feel the sky, the wind, and the desire to soar and keep going!”  S.F.

SOLO MATADOR  54X54

SOLO MATADOR  54X54
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/S/Solo_Matador-big.jpg

“The sky is ending the night and
I follow, only follow to charge my dream

Invitation to instant exoticism…
A fantasy performed free from evocation.

In front of my eyes the endless silhouette of a Matador
becomes elegance in motion.

Before me his face suspended from his golden locks
eyes brilliant, reading my soul, rushing my heartbeat…

My trembling voice reveals my aim…
If I only could…

—let yourself go with the wind.” S.F.

Parlement

PARLEMENT  50X50
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/P/Parlement-big.jpg

“The Gray of Mystery..The Gray of revolt of Fear..The Gray echoes
melodies played on a white piano..
These scores are the musical transcriptions of the image..of Parlement!” S.F.

ELECTRIC BALADE  48X60

ELECTRIC BALADE  48X60
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/E/Electric_Balade-big.jpg

“The smash hit of the evening was the Electric Ingénue and her music.
More naked than dressed in her flowing glow, wrapped in a powdery
flower scent and thigh high jeweled boots..she caught the breathless
desire of everyone in the room..
Her entrance signaled the presence of a New Generation..” S.F.

Thinking of You

THINKING OF YOU  48X48
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/T/Thinking_of_You-big.jpg

“A sun ray caressing my face brought you in to me..
loss of thought now..

..in the essence of intimacy
the right moment..

“For members only” space of mind now is yours…
How do I go about?

My essence of intimacy fractured…
Am I at a loss?

Spirits of beasts want my soul..
fading the rush in eyes wide open..

Your magic wand can change seahorses to dragonflies..
I don’t want to change..

only let your destination become my own…

Colormusic my constant reference creates my thoughts..

…and through the looking glass
i see -you- now..

.. and hear the echos from the walls of Palazzo Grassi:

“Where are we going?” S.F.

RENCONTRES  30X40

RENCONTRES  30X40
http://sophiafine.com/paintings/R/Rencontres-big.jpg

“Setting the tone.That is my vocation. A wonderous job. It is veering
from the extreme concentration of the moments, meticulous as measuring
the right amount of coloring for the total freedom to create.
But it is such a place to be! This immersion in color, that midway, in
the journey, I know the expression.. I see the final stage! Dazed and
befuddled..coraled out, this moment is all mine!
In my studio…” S.F.

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We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.