Recording Device (Part 2)

The Architectist Records the City.


Recording Device, NYC Pier (1996) (This project was about recording an “image” or in my case “movement” and “image.” After visiting the given site and completing a thorough analysis of how a photographic lenses and shutter work, the idea that evolved was to record the movement of the adjacent traffic. The movement (speed and weight) of the passing automobiles and other vehicles that drive over the adjacent roadway would be translated to the recording device in the Hudson River which would in turn sculpt the pier accordingly. These are slides taken by the professor of the models I built to fit into the class site model.)


Recording Device, Image #4
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Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III


Recording Device, Image #5
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Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III

Recording Device, Image #6
Architectist-0018.jpg
Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III – Architect & Visual Artist

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Recording Device (Part 1)

The Architectist Records the City.


Recording Device, NYC Pier (1996) (This project was about recording an “image” or in my case “movement” and “image.” After visiting the given site and completing a thorough analysis of how a photographic lenses and shutter work, the idea that evolved was to record the movement of the adjacent traffic. The movement (speed and weight) of the passing automobiles and other vehicles that drive over the adjacent roadway would be translated to the recording device in the Hudson River which would in turn sculpt the pier accordingly. These are slides taken by the professor of the models I built to fit into the class site model.)

Recording Device, Image #1
Architectist-0014.jpg
Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III


Recording Device, Image #2
Architectist-0015.jpg
Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III

Recording Device, Image #3
Architectist-0016.jpg
Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III – Architect & Visual Artist

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Recording Apparatus

This is a scan of “real” film negative my professor took of my studio design project.  The idea for my project is that as the traffic crosses the West Side Highway in Manhattan, the movement sparks the “recording device” to carve away at the pier revealing a work of art based on the movement of the vehicles.Recording Apparatus

Recording Apparatus

Photo of the Day – August 12, 2010

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Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III.
Frank Cunha III – Architect & Visual Artist
Registered Architect, NJ, NY, PA, CT, DE
PO Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
E-mail: fc3arch @me.com
Tel: 973.970.3551
Fax: 973.718.4641

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The Paradox of Design: How to Balance Innovation and the Comfort of the Familiar

Innovation Vs. the Familiar

As a designer there is always a strong urge to want to innovate and create something brand new.  However, as much as most people think they want to be different they also want to cling to the familiar, i.e., favorite brands, clothes, cars, sneakers, etc.  Even foods, coined comfort foods, are based on the familiar.  The familiar has the power to help one reminisce and conjure up past images, one of happy feelings and desires, joy, anticipation, and bliss.  Maybe that’s why 85% or more of our houses look identical.

So how can we as designers balance the “old” or the familiar with the “new” and the innovative?

It is important to design creatively while providing the sensation of “memory.”  This is not a new concept. Here is a quote discussing such dispositions from an article entitled, Science Studies How Architecture Affects the Brain:

“Architectural experience is recorded in what Antonio Damasio calls “dispositions” — records in our brain of a combination of sensory inputs, memories, emotions and any related muscle memories. Just below the surface of consciousness these dispositions wait for the next experience with which they can be paired. For example, each time we enter the office in which we work we are recalling a dispositional record of our last visit — including any emotional experiences we may have had. When we leave our office at the end of the day, our brain creates a new dispositional record that updates the one we came with that morning.” (Recording Device 1) (Recording Device 2)

Design with this in mind – the space should allow the occupants to capture the past and allow them the ability to record future memories.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
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Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Augmented Reality Enables Children to Learn in the Real World #ilmaBlog #Education #VR #Technology #Classroom #MyUniversityArchitect #Architect

MBDs (Mobile broadband devices, or smartphones) allow students to access and collect additional information and clues. Students use EcoMOBILE activities developed with an augmented reality application, to navigate between “hotspots,” view information, answer questions, and observe virtual media overlaid on the physical pond.

Students can capture pictures, video, or voice recordings and take these back to the classroom to help make sense of school lessons. Through augmented reality we provide students with visualizations that would not otherwise be apparent in the natural environment (for example, virtual x-ray vision so that they can “see” a virtual carbon atom as it moves through the processes of photosynthesis and respiration).

These augmented reality experiences allow students to conceptualize and discuss processes and complex relationships that are otherwise difficult to describe or visualize.

We would love to hear from you about what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Drone Technology

Drone-Technology-02Drones—also called unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or unmanned aerial systems (UAS)—are most simply described as flying devices that do not carry a human pilot. They can be remotely piloted or they can pilot themselves based on pre-programmed instructions. They can be equipped with GPS, on board computers, hardware, electronics, sensors, stabilizers, auto-pilots, servo controllers, and any other equipment the user desires to install. Drones can resemble fixed-wing airplanes but more commonly take the form of quad-copters, that is, rotor-wing aircraft that can take off and land vertically. Most people know that drones can be equipped with infra-red cameras (still and video), license-plate readers, “ladar” (laser radar that generate three-dimensional images and can be seen through trees and foliage), thermal-imaging devices, or even sensors that gather data about weather, temperature, radiation or other environmental conditions. All of this can be used to generate images, recordings or data that design professionals eventually will want to use in their business.

Drones could be a valuable tool in construction, widening the spectrum of what’s possible in architecture, according to architect Ammar Mirjan.

“We can fly [drones] through and around existing objects, which a person couldn’t do or a crane couldn’t do,” explains Mirjan. They can be programmed to weave simple tensile structures in the air, for example.

Sources & References:

https://www.dezeen.com/2017/05/04/mark-dytham-interview-drones-uavs-bring-profound-change-architecture-cities/

http://www.theaiatrust.com/architects-guide-using-drones/

https://www.dezeen.com/2018/05/25/10-ways-drones-will-change-the-world/

How are aerial mapping drones helping architects?

Architects are exploring the many benefits of mapping drones for improving and expanding their businesses. Here are just a few examples:

The most popular application for small drones is aerial photography and video capture to track and share “before and after” progress over time.

Ability to securely collaborate on specific areas of interest with your team, contractors, and customers.

Tell the story of your project.  Show current and potential customers before and after fly-throughs of your job site so they can experience and appreciate the scale and impact of your work.

3-D point clouds with centimeter grade accuracy on progress, so you can get the precision updates you need to keep project approvals on time, without physically traveling to the site.

Get context for your project, plan your architecture with a full view of the surrounding area.

See 3D volumetrics so you know what you’re building on and can track progress.

Uses for Drones

  • Project documentation
  • Presentation + marketing
  • Architectural cinematography
  • Site analysis
  • Topographic mapping
  • Construction observation
  • Educational tool
  • Lead generation (working with Realtors)

Conclusion

According to an interview in Dezeen.com with Mark Dytham, architect and co-founder of Tokyo-based Klein Dytham Architecture, “Drones will transform the way buildings are designed, the way they look and the way they are used.

One way in which drones are proving to be a useful tool in architecture is through surveying. Due to their small size and relative ease of maneuverability, drones make an easy task of accessing difficult to reach places.

According to ArchDaily.com, “While using satellite imagery for site planning is common among architects, these visuals are often available in low resolution and produce less accurate data. Data collected by drones can completely eliminate the need for hiring land surveyors for creating topographic surveys. Instead, architects can use this information to build accurate 3D models of the terrain and site and import them directly into drafting and modeling software like Rhino.” In the past, architects would have relied on planes, helicopters, or satellite imaging for aerial footage.

Sources & References:

https://www.identifiedtech.com/blog/construction-drones/how-aerial-mapping-drones-can-help-architects/

http://residencestyle.com/the-use-of-drones-in-architecture-soars-to-new-heights/

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


My Number Three | 03111211371151 — Collaboration by @FC3ZMD @Zorlone @FrankCunhaIII

Photo taken by Lorenzo Bernardino – Philippines (using iPhone) | Re-Edited by Frank Cunha III in Photoshop – USA.

The original photo taken by my friend and international collaborator, Lorenzo Bernardino, inspired me to talk about the #3 and why I think it is such a fantastic number (besides the fact that it is my name).

Here is link to other projects we have worked together on and click here to see other posts about numbers.

Original Photo taken by Lorenzo Bernardino – Philippines (using iPhone).

The following is borrowed from Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia:

Read the rest of this entry »


Attention Deficit Disorder – Designing Every 2 to 3 Minutes

A.D.D. may be over diagnosed these days (especially in schools), but during Architecture School one of my professors wanted my friend to see how long I could stay at my drafting table (remember those? I’m dating myself here, although my class may have been one of the last to use them).  After a few minutes I would get restless, now with social media I can work on several things at once which satisfies the A.D.D.

What we discovered (after several all-nighters) was a direct link between where I lived and the airplane “noise” I would hear subconsciously (after living under the flight zone my entire life my consciousness had completely tuned it out).  I used the timing of the flights (every 2 to 3 minutes) to help inform my Architectural design theories.  For example;

Recording Apparatus

New York City Recording Apparatus

Here is a map of where I grew up:

Where I grew up and lived for close to 30-years

A Closer Look

Perhaps this helps shed some light on how I operate!

Sincerely,
@FrankCunhaIII