From Paper and Pencil to Reality Through Collaboration

One of the last two projects I worked on while at Cubellis Ecoplan (now Environetics) is currently under construction (below).  The other project I was fortunate to design was the Delaware Welcome Center (featured here).  I was only involved in the design and design development of both projects (not the construction) but they were fun to work on with the other team members.  As the lead Project Manager I collaborated with others because I feel that through collaboration the best product can be delivered to the client.  The sketch below was the result of about a work week worth of sketching with various people around the office.  Every line and every curve was meticulously thought out and designed to be exactly where it needed to be (sort of like when Kahn said, What does this brick want to be?).  Although it was unfortunate that the timing of my departure occurred before I could be involved with wrapping up the construction drawings and overseeing construction, it is still rewarding to see the progression of the construction of this 45,000 SF project at one of NJ’s largest Universities.  There is no feeling like the one you get watching the lines you drew on a piece of paper become reality right before your eyes.  Although I’m not involved in construction I quietly admire all the contractors and design team members that are helping my design become a reality.  Without the collaboration of many this vision would have never been able to be executed.

Finley Hall – Under Construction

Finley Hall – Design by Frank Cunha III

Finley Hall

Click Here to Read More about this building.

Also Check Out:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Architecture of Hope #ilmaBlog

Everyone loves when new project is conceived.  The designs that are imagined in collaboration with an Architect and an Owner is magical – it is one of the rare opportunities in life when we have some control about creating something meaningful.  An architecture project offers hope and meaning to a world filled with complexity, anxiety and chaos. 

When a project is developed there is a sense of hope that the world will be a better place.  Great architecture allows people’s lives to change for the better addressing the programmatic needs of the client while offering beautiful, harmonic spaces for the occupants.

When an Architect envisions a space for a client, they are taking a wish and making it a reality.  The new spaces that make up the built work will become treasured by those who are able to experience it.  The building itself will shape the lives of the occupants and allow them to do the things they could not before.  Great architecture is more than just a shelter or a place that addresses the client’s need.  Great architecture transcends time and space and connects us in various ways: literally connects us in real time when using the space but also interacts with the occupants as experiences are etched into the memory of the building.  There is a feeling you get when you are in a great building.  It is difficult to describe but the space itself is more than the sum of its parts.  It is a spiritual experience.  An example of such a building for me is the Guggenheim Museum by Frank Lloyd Wright or the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts by Frank Furness.

Experiencing these buildings on various occasions exemplifies how Architects can design buildings in a way that epitomizes hope.  There are two definitions for hope: (1) a feeling of expectation and desire for a certain thing to happen and (2) a feeling of trust.  Indeed, experiencing these spaces and many others the occupant does have a strong desire for something to happen and there is a feeling of trust that something will happen.  When visiting these special places, it is easy to see that designing architecture of hope allows the visitor a chance to experience a space that otherwise would be unexciting and humdrum.

When starting out on a project it is important to address this inherent desire to create someplace distinctive and extraordinary by thinking about how we as great Architects can live up to the desires and hope of our clients, even when they may not clearly see or sense the hope in the vision they are trying to construct.  Our jobs as Architects is to offer hope to our clients through our exceptional and distractive skills, blending art and science and craft when practicing Architecture.   If we can do this then we can create an Architecture filled with hope.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

Suggested Reading:

My Architecture Manifesto: “Architecture Shall Live On” by Architect @FrankCunhaIII #Architect #Design #Theory #AvantGarde #ilmaBlog #DesignTheory #Architecture

Architects Vs. “Sculptor” Architects based on a conversation btw @WJMArchitect and @FrankCunhaIII

Ophiuchus: The Serpent Bearer (Playing With Numbers)


Design by Architectist @FrankCunhaIII #Architect #Artist

Thank you for all the support and encouragement over the years.  Here are some of our favorite blog posts about the design process related to the field of Architecture:

  1. Architecture Shall Live On (My Architecture Manifesto) by @FrankCunhaIII
  2. Timeless Architecture – Saying Good Bye to a Teacher/Mentor is Never Easy by @FrankCunhaIII
  3. Architecture in Motion by @FrankCunhaIII
  4. X Factor of Design by @FrankCunhaIII
  5. Creating High Performance Buildings through Integrative Design Process by @FrankCunhaIII
  6. Frans Johansson: “Act & Collaborate to Drive Change” by @FrankCunhaIII
  7. SPACE & PROCESS by @FrankCunhaIII
  8. Order, Formulas, and Rules by @FrankCunhaIII
  9. Mixing My Work With Pleasure (Design-Build, Modern House Using Legos) by @FrankCunhaIII
  10. The Blind Design Paradox in Architectural Design by @WJMArchitect
  11. Architects Vs. “Sculptor” Architects based on a conversation btw @WJMArchitect and @FrankCunhaIII
  12. Ophiuchus: The Serpent Bearer (Playing With Numbers) by @FrankCunhaIII
  13. From Paper and Pencil to Reality Through Collaboration by @FrankCunhaIII

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Our Exclusive ILMA Interview with Matthew B. Jarmel, AIA, MBA of @JarmelKizel

Mr. Jarmel is an Architect, Real Estate Developer, Renewable Energy Enthusiast, Entrepreneur and Owner of Jarmel Kizel Architects and Engineers Inc.

He received a Bachelors of Architecture from NJIT in 1990 and an MBA from Rutgers University in 1994. He can be found online at the following social media sites: LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.

About the Firm

Since the firm’s founding in 1975, Jarmel Kizel has worked its way from the inside out; originally concentrating on the interior design of corporate offices and since has grown into a full-service Architectural, Engineering, and Interior Design firm that provides a single point of accountability for all aspects of design services. The firm’s size and abilities enable it to handle a broad spectrum of projects while allowing the principals to put their seal on every one. With in-house Civil, Structural, Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing and Fire Protection Engineering, clients can look to Jarmel Kizel to have all aspects of their projects designed and managed by one firm.

Today the firm provides a unique service platform that provides a single point of accountability for architectural and engineering services formatted to assist clients with managing their project’s design needs from site design and land entitlements to building design through construction oversight.

ILMA INTERVIEW

When and why did you decide to become an Architect?     

I knew when I was in Junior High School that I wanted to become an architect.  I grew up in the industry in that my father is a commercial interior designer, he actually founded our firm in 1975, and I was exposed to design and construction at a very early age.  My dad totally remodeled our home and he had my brother Richard, who is a civil engineer and partner in our firm, and myself helping and working with tools. 

What were some of the challenges of achieving your dream?  

The architectural and engineering industry can be very rewarding.  There is tremendous emotional fulfillment to see your ideas first take shape on paper and then through construction.  I take great pride driving by a building our firm has designed and saying we did that.  Despite the rewards the business of architecture can be very difficult.  Our industry is first hit by a recession, hardest hit and usually the last to recover.   One of the greatest challenges of working in the profession is learning how to batten down the hatches and weather the economic storms when they come. 

Any memorable clients or project highlights?  

I have many projects I am proud of many clients that I respect and that have become good friends and even partners over the years.  Some of the more notable projects I have worked on include designing the Bear Stearns Campus in Whippany, NJ.  This project was developed over years and ultimately included approximately 700,000 sf of office and data center space in five buildings, two of which we designed and the rest we designed major renovations to.  Unfortunately Bear Stearns does not exist anymore but the campus is still there.  We also were fortunate to design the first major redevelopment project in Plainfield, NJ where we designed four buildings for the Union County Improvement Authority that included a 100,000 sf office building, two retail buildings totaling 40,000 sf and a parking structure.   This project acted as a catalyst for new development in the city.   Over the last several years the firm has been very active in NYC designing many mixed use large scale projects, we have a 17 story building under construction in Queens right now.   One of my most memorable clients is The Learning Experience.   The Learning Experience is a national and soon to be international brand of child development centers.  We designed their first center 16 years ago and have since completed over 200 projects throughout the country for them.  Because of the volume of projects we have completed for them, about 70 in NJ alone, I gained tremendous experience in land entitlements and have become an expert in land entitlement strategy.

How does your family support what you do?    

The creative process can be very time consuming, running a business and being creative magnifies the time required to be an architect.  Some days I leave the house at 7 and if I have a hearing don’t get home until midnight.   Other times I am hopping on an airplane and away overnight.   My family is supportive in that they understand the taxing requirements of the job.   With that said everything I do is for my family.  So I make sure my wife and children get the attention they need from me and we plan as much quality time as possible.

How do Architects measure success?     

Some might say you measure the success of an architect by the quality and aesthetic of the buildings he or she designs, or by how much wealth and fame they have obtained.  To me a successful architect you have to be a strong leader, a strong communicator and be able to balance the aesthetic and technical issues of a building’s design all while understanding the functional and economical goals of your client.  The architect that can achieve this can become successful.  Ultimately success is measured by obtaining the respect of your peers, clients and even contractors in the industry.  

What matters most to you in design?      

Achieving my clients goals of function and budget while creating a building that is safe and attractive.   

What do you hope to achieve over the next 2 years? 5 years?  

Our firm has developed strong skills in real estate development which include land entitlements and real estate economics.   Many times we set the strategy for how to present a project to planning and zoning boards, explain the process to our clients and even their attorneys, advise on PILOT and other incentives, building valuation and assist in making introduction to equity investors and lenders.   These skills make us stand out from our competitors but not necessarily obtain higher fees.  Our goal for the next 2 to 5 years is to expand our Real Estate Advisory services to create additional revenue as a “Fee Developer” and on our own development account.

Who is your favorite Architect? Why?     

I respect the design styles of many current and historic architects.  I am a big fan of the Chicago School and of those architects Louis Sullivan is probably my favorite.  I like this style for the buildings of the time were the first commercial buildings and first to break away from using ancient detailing by employing and emphasizing technology in design.

Do you have a coach or mentor?

I do not have a specific coach or mentor but I like to bounce ideas off of my team, clients and friends.  

What is your favorite historic and modern (contemporary) project? Why?  

My favorite historic building is the Roman Pantheon.  It was built around 113 AD and has the largest unreinforced concrete dome ever made which has a giant hole in the center that allows the sun and the moon to shine in along with the rain.  It still stands 2000 years later.  The Romans were great builders, they invented concrete, experimented with reinforcing concrete with brass chains and even developed zoning rules and regulations.   As far as contemporary buildings there are so many that I love.   I lean towards high rise sky scrapers

Where do you see the profession going over the next few decades?

Although new technologies are implemented in the profession and we go through these stages where we preach design build vs a separation between design and construction professionals the industry has not changed much in my career.  I find it interesting that Ayn Rand’s “The Fountainhead” which was written in the 40’s and takes place in the 20’s and uses the architectural industry as a back story to promoting her political views speaks to many of the same type of players and issues in the industry today.  There are developers, contractors, politicians and architects.  There are residential, public and commercial buildings and she even tackles issues such as affordable housing.  All the same issues we deal with today.   I do not see major changes in the business of the profession.  Although I do see major technical influences which will affect the way we design and build buildings.  There is a robot that lays brick now.  I think as the world gets smaller through technology building codes and licensing laws will become more standardized.

What type of technology do you see in the design and construction industries?

The use of BIM is becoming the most prevalent tool used in the design of buildings.  It allows architects and engineers to work in 3 dimensions, quickly and efficiently to improve coordination and actually see the building take shape on the screen.  Despite my comment about the brick laying robot above most construction is still done with heavy machinery and by hand.  However, technology has taken over the management of projects from creating schedules, to tracking financing and creating a database of information.  

Who / what has been your greatest influence in design?      

This answer may seem odd to most architects but my great influence in design arrives from an understanding of real estate economics tied to a building’s function and economics.   When a student at NJIT I took an elective in real estate development.  It was taught by a gentleman who ran the development arm of a now defunct savings and loan so we will allow him to remain nameless.  However, he was very influential in that he said he hated architects and found them to be a necessary evil in the process because the law forced them on him to use.  Obviously, this got most of the students in the class upset but I wanted to know why he felt that way.  He thought that architects only cared about what the building looked like and had no understanding or really care for what it might cost to build, what’s its function was to be or how it generated revenue for its owners.  He introduced me to the business side of why clients build in the first place.  This motivated me to go on and obtain an MBA with a concentration in real estate development and urban land use after architectural school.  I feel that the business education in conjunction with my architectural education make me a stronger architect and have been the most influential on my design.

Which building or project type would you like to work on that you haven’t been part of yet?     

I have been fortunate to work on almost any type of commercial project.  I would like to be exposed to more hospitality projects.

How do you hope to inspire / mentor the next generation of Architects?   

I hope to mentor the next generation of architects in a way that they can understand the business goals of the client and why they are building so that they can better respond to the client’s needs I also want to mentor them to be strong leaders and great communicators.

What advice would you give aspiring architects (K-12)? College students? Graduates?

I would advise them to not only pursue their dream of designing buildings but to learn about the profession as a whole, to learn about the process of becoming an architect and career choices in the industry.  When I was in school no one told me how to become a licensed architect I had to figure it out on my own.

What does Architecture mean to you?     

It is my profession, it is my life!

What is your design process?     

First understand the client’s program goals and budget, then study the site and zoning constraints, roll up my sleeves and dive in.

If you could not be an Architect, what would you be?     

A civil engineer and or real estate developer.

What is your dream project?     

A really tall building in a major city that becomes a landmark for years to come.  If I can be a partner in its ownership even better.

What advice do you have for a future Executive leader?     

Respect and care about the people you are leading, be kind but stern.

What are three key challenges you face as a leader in business today and one trend you see in your industry?     

All challenges revolve around people.  First finding qualified people, there is a tremendous shortage of qualified architects and engineers, second finding people that can see the big picture first before the crawl into the details and finally finding people that can communicate effectively.   As far as trends see my answer to where I see the industry going above

What one thing must an executive leader be able to do to be successful in the next 3 years?      

I am optimistic that we are at the beginning of a sustainable economic growth period.  This will provide many of us with significant projects to choose from and an even more challenging labor shortage.  An executive leader will need to be able to recruit talent and keep them motivated to stay.

What are some executive insights you have gained since you have been sitting in the executive leadership seat – or what is one surprise you have encountered as the world of business continues to morph as we speak?     

I do not know if I am any smarter today at 50 then I was when I got out of school in my early 20’s what I have gained is life experience.  The most important lesson is that people will surprise you. Some will impress you, some will disappoint you, some will be loyal and others not.  I have seen some crazy things happen some good and some bad.   Just when I think I have seen everything someone surprises me. 

Final Thoughts on How to Be Successful?      

Learn your trade, be good at and then learn to be a good communication and leader and business person.

For more exclusive ILMA interviews click here.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

Gift Ideas from ILMA


New Research Facility, Montclair State University

CELS Montclair_2011

Slide07 Slide12

My Role: Senior Project Manager for the Owner during the Programming, Design, Bidding/Procurement & Construction Phases of the Project

Owner: Montclair State University

Architect: SLAM

Contractor: T.B.D.

Construction Manger: T.B.D.

About the Project:

The new Center for Environmental & Life Sciences (CELS) project will include construction of 100,000 (plus mechanical penthouse) gross square feet of new academic and research space and associated site development on the site of McEachern Hall, located along the eastern ridgeline of MSU’s upper campus.

The CELS program identifies approximately 57,000 Net Square Feet of new space and is organized into four specific functional space categories:

Office:  departmental hub, private offices for all FT faculty offices, open offices for graduate students, adjuncts, visiting professors and technical staff.

Instructional:  departmental and CSAM assigned teaching labs, classrooms and support (i.e. prep / storage).

Research:  shared and dedicated research space, including both traditional “wet” and dry labs, to support computational and equipment-intensive activities.

Other:  includes common spaces such as multipurpose rooms, lobbies, lounges and support.

The CELS building will be focused on trans-disciplinary research.  Key components of the proposed CELS program include:

  • 7 trans-disciplinary research lab group suites (accommodating as many as 148 faculty and students)
  • 6 core research labs, accommodating as many as 44 faculty and students
  • 150-seat lecture hall
  • Earth & Environmental Studies Department
  • 4 institutes & centers office suites (+ 1 lab group)
  • College of Science and Mathematics Dean’s Suite
  • Lounges and study/breakout areas for students

Planning/Design Objectives:

  • Create a new identity for the Sciences thru the building and landscape design (Formation of a Science Quad).
  • Consolidate the Sciences and promote better adjacencies.
  • Utilize program density to create a building with activity and a sense of place for the sciences.
  • Design the building to compliment the campus context with the Quad to the west and the distant views to the east (New York City skyline).
  • Reinforce with campus mission-style architecture.
  • Design to LEED certification level of Silver.
  • Design to accommodate trans-disciplinary research thru flexible/adaptable lab configurations.
  • Plan to allow for future expansion of the Sciences with a possible connection to the existing Buildings.

Also Check Out:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


New Years Resolutions for Our Clients by @FrankCunhaIII

2013 is going to be great ~ Sending you lots of love, hope, peace, health, happiness and prosperity! Sincerely, Frank & the I.L.M.A. Team

2013 is going to be great ~ Sending you lots of love, hope, peace, health, happiness and prosperity!                               Sincerely, Frank & the I.L.M.A. Team

1) Pay more for design

Benefit to client:          Save more money on construction

Usually, given more time and money designers can provide Owners with a higher level of detail.  Ultimately, more detailed construction drawings result in less unknowns and contractor change orders.

2) Spend money upfront on construction

Benefit to client:          Save more money on monthly bills

Spending money upfront on higher-end, premium energy-efficient items can ultimately reduce operating costs.  Work with your Architect to see where you can get your highest return on initial investment.

3) Be flexible with the look and feel

Benefit to client:          Get what you pay for

Some times clients have preconceived notions on the outcome of their projects, which is fine (I like to collaborate), it actually helps us narrow down the look and feel of the project.  However, the professional has undergone many years of training in most cases 8-10 years before earning a license to practice Architecture.  If you are serious about your project you should stay flexible and strongly consider your Architect’s suggestions to help work toward achieving the best design possible. 

4) Engage your Architect for Extended Construction Administration Services

Benefit to client:          Only the Architect can interpret the construction drawings to ensure that the design intent of the project is being met; The additional cost for the Architect will likely result in overall savings to the Owner

Whether it’s a small project or a large one and whether it’s a new build, repair and restoration, or alterations and renovations it is important to have the continuous support of your Architect.  The money you spend on professional services will likely pale in comparison to the change orders that may result if the Architect is not involved.  Since the Architect has liability, the Architect will be the strongest advocate for the Owner while working with the Contractor to ensure that the intent of the design is upheld.

 5) Be Creative

Benefit to client:          Stand out from the competition

Sometimes it’s OK to blend in and sometimes it is not.  If you want to stand out and be noticed, try to let loose and work with your Architect to come up with something fresh and exciting.  Great design doesn’t necessarily have to cost more money.

6) Build a Team and Have “Charrettes”

Benefit to client:          Conventional design build methods creates tension between the Owner, Contractor, and the Design Team

Teamwork is extremely important in design and construction because getting a high-performance project requires that builders challenge conventional ways of doing things. Integrated design focusing on a holistic design approach can include what Builders and Architects call a “charrette,” a meeting or series of meetings bringing together the designer, builder, and subcontractors to discuss the project and swap ideas.  This approach is much more successful and can save the Owner money since the team is working towards a common goal instead of protecting each entity’s own interest.

7) Don’t Panic: Assign Accountability not Blame

Benefit to client:          Integrated design will help achieve greater results

Things can and usually do go wrong in any relationship. When a crisis arises the primary need is to correct the problem, not to affix blame. “Accountability is important—but the most important thing is to find the solution first. It’s best not to panic.”

Also Check Out:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Conrad J. Schmitt Hall Renovation, Montclair State University



MSU Finley - 07.26.2007_OLD_Page_1 MSU Finley - 07.26.2007_OLD_Page_2 MSU Finley - 07.26.2007_OLD_Page_3 MSU Finley - 07.26.2007_OLD_Page_4 MSU Finley - 07.26.2007_OLD_Page_5

Role:                     Senior Project Manager – Concept through design development.

Owner:                  Montclair State University

Architect:              Cubellis Ecoplan

About the Project:

Formerly named Finley Hall, Conrad J. Schmitt Hall has been renovated and now houses several departments within the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

The project consisted of a complete renovation of 37,000 S.F. of an existing two story building down to existing structural elements and the addition of a third floor. The total area of the building has been increased to 52,700 square feet. There are new classrooms on the first floor, faculty offices on the second floor, and general purpose classrooms and additional office space on the third floor. The project also included construction of a new entrance tower, a new elevator on the south side of the building and a new exterior wall system. The cost of this project was $18M.

For more information about tis project click here.

Also Check Out:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Frank Sinatra Hall, Montclair State University

Photo of Sinatra Hall Exterior
View a panorama of the Sinatra Hall exterior.

Photo of Sinatra Hall Interior
View a panorama of the Sinatra Hall interior.

My Role: Senior Project Manager for the Owner during the Construction Phase of the Project

Owner: Montclair State University

Architect: Fletcher Thompson Architects & Engineers

Contractor: Brockwell & Carrington

Construction Manger: Skanska

About the Project:

Frank Sinatra Hall is Montclair State University’s newest residence hall, which opened in the Fall 2010.  Located along Clove Road on the western edge of the campus, Sinatra Hall is a six story residential facility containing 303 beds.

  • A lounge area on every floor
  • Laundry facilities on floors 2 through 6
  • Elevators
  • Community Kitchen
  • Card access to suite doors

Suite setup:

  • Suite Style living
  • 6 to 8 residents per suite
  • Suites are a combination of single, double and triple bedrooms
  • All suites contain a full bathroom, powder room, and shower room, so as to provide three comfort opportunities simultaneously

All Suites in Sinatra Hall are:

  • Fully furnished
  • Carpeted
  • Have heat and air conditioning capability
  • Completely wireless
  • Wired for cable TV with 78 channels

Bedroom Features:

  • Multi-position single beds
  • Desk with chair
  • Wardrobe Closet
  • 3 Drawer dresser

And click here for more info.

Also Check Out:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Ophiuchus: The Serpent Bearer (Playing With Numbers)

Whether it is because I have OCD or because I was raised Catholic and am fascinated with numbers, take for example the number 13 which is the number of letters I have in my name: FRANK CUNHA III (without the spaces); Some say that the concept of Friday 13 being an unlucky day is linked with events that occurred in the Christian Bible, and they interpret that these events occurred on a Friday. Examples include the great flood during the time of Noah, the confusion of languages at the Tower of Babel, the day Eve tempted Adam with the apple, and the day Jesus Christ died.   But I digress, the point of this post is to memorialize my ability to finally record (albeit partially) the shadow of Ophiuchus cast onto the concrete pad at a popular sculpture located at Montclair State University.  I first heard about the sculpture from a studio professor at NJIT (Don Wall, friend to John Hedjuk).  I believe Don Wall was trying to stress the importance of context, spatial relations, and the memorialization of event in the design of Architecture.  I was finally able to capture the shadow after more than 10-years (I simply kept missing it as life passed by).  But here it is…..finally! 
(Click Image to See Larger Version)


Ophiuchus: The Serpent Bearer” sculpture by former professor Mac Adams is located adjacent to Finley Hall and Sprague Library. It is a fusion of art and science. “Technically, the shadow sculpture is made of steel wedges, bars and disks that seemingly mean nothing sensible,” Rodriguez explained. “However, the breathtaking image emerges when the summer sun casts the shadow of the work from noon to approximately 1:15 p.m. between May and July of each year.  (See other sculptures located at MSU.)

Because of the partial overlap of the constellation Ophiuchus and the Sun’s path upon which zodiacal longitude is based, Ophiuchus is sometimes mistakenly referred to as the ’13th sign of the Zodiac’. This is an inappropriate reference since the zodiac is a division of the ecliptic into twelve equal parts, initially originated for calendrical purposes. This makes the notion of a ’13th sign’ a mathematical impossibility. It is only correct to refer to Ophiuchus as one of the constellations which cross the zodiac; which does not constitute a zodiacal sign, of which all historical records acknowledge only twelve.


New Delaware Welcome Center (Interstate 95)

My Role: Senior Project Manager for the Architect during the Schematic Design Phase.

Owner: HMS Host  Corporation

Architect: Environetics

About the Project:

This project is a new 42,000 SF Travel Plaza building housing food and beverage as well as retail concession, restrooms and tourism center. The project incorporates numerous energy and water savings techniques. The project is registered with the USGBC and will be seeking LEED certification when complete.

More information available at Architect’s website and the Owner’s website.

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If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Babbio Center, Stevens Institute of Technology

My Role: Project Manager – Involved in the project from concept design through construction.

Owner: Stevens Institute of Technology

Architect: Cubellis Ecoplan

Contractor: Terminal Construction

About the Project:

The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center for Technology Management is one of the world’s preeminent institutions in the education of professionals who lead and manage technological innovation in businesses in America and around the world.  Educating managers who use technology to create extraordinary value for the societies in which they live, it offers education programs designed and delivered by leading industry practitioners who are important contributors to the creation of new knowledge in the field.   The Howe School also conducts worldclass research in several focused areas of Technology Management, especially in the domain of Technology Innovation, Commercialization and Entrepreneurship.  Research is applied in orientation and grounded in Technogenesis®.   Technogenesis is Stevens’ educational environment where students, faculty and industry collaborate to turn innovation, invention and discovery into marketplace success.Opened in the Spring of 2006, the Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center for Technology Management, a six-story, 95,000 square foot structure serves as the new signature headquarters for the Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management at Stevens Institute of Technology.  On the lower four levels, a vibrant mix of classrooms, laboratories and research library are united by an atrium lobby.  Externally, the lecture hall volume is used expressively to evoke the energy of the activity within.  Above, students, faculty and visiting business representatives work together in an office environment that is the antithesis of the “traditional” faculty office suite.  A glass-enclosed conference and open teaming area seems to hover within the top of the atrium lobby enclosure and offers a suitable environment to foster the kind of corporate partnerships that form the basis of the program.

The Center is blessed with amazing contextual opportunities. On one side is a rich and vibrant urban landscape of 6-8 story buildings of a variety of materials and historical styles. On another it faces campus buildings, gates and pathways leading to more campus-like areas of the Institute. Finally, sitting atop the cliffs to the Hudson, the site offers panoramic views of the river and the Manhattan skyline. The entrepreneurial drive and spirit of the Howe School of Technology Management was a catalyst for developing a vocabulary that highlights the contrast between a contextually-responsive primary form and vigorously sculptural and modern forms. The primary form of the building takes cues from its neighbors for materials, setbacks and various alignments of both mass and detail.  A round, tapering, metal-clad form housing lecture rooms, intersects the primary volume aggressively and helping to form a high arcade that very loosely recalls the crenellations of the adjacent gothic gateway to the original campus area. Finally, a very simple glass-clad atrium form, engages the primary form at it’s center to unite a variety of interior areas and to afford to many within the building the incredible view of the Hudson River and Manhattan skyline.  The atrium’s angled alignment acknowledges the configuration of adjacent pedestrian walkways, using this prominent site to unite the urban and more traditional landscapes of the Steven’s campus.A four-story parking garage built into the side of the promontory edge of the campus forms the base of the building.  When completed, the garage will extend toward the river, its roof top forming an expansive plaza entrance for the Babbio Center and an important new campus landscape asset.

For more information about the management program click here.

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We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III, AIA
Registered Architect
Licensed in CT, DC, DE, FL, MD, NJ, NY, PA, VA
I Love My Architect – Facebook
FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
web: http://fc3arch.com


Music School, Montclair State University

My Role: Senior Project Manager for the Owner during the Construction Phase of the Project

Owner: Montclair State University

Architect: RMJM / Hillier

Contractor: Brockwell & Carrington

Construction Manager: Gilbane

About the Project:

The John J. Cali School of Music is an adaptive re-use project that transforms a former dormitory and classroom building into a state-of-the-art teaching, practice and performance facility, and creates a new “gateway” building for the campus.

Built in 1928 in the Spanish Mission Style, the building originally known as Chapin Hall served as a dormitory until a later renovation transformed it into a classroom and departmental office facility. In 2005, the University commissioned RMJM Hillier Architecture to renovate and expand the original structure to establish a new home for the John J. Cali School of Music.

The program calls for a 250-seat recital hall; teaching studios; music practice and rehearsal rooms; and faculty offices. Another goal of the project is to comply with a Certification Level according to the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) Rating System.

To accommodate the program, the design proposes a new 23,000-square-foot, 2-story addition to the original 5-story, 29,000-square-foot structure, for a total of 52,000 square feet. The need for superior acoustics required the design team to overcome several challenges posed by the building’s existing tight floor-to-floor heights and older mechanical systems. Practice rooms and teaching studios are designed as a “box within a box” for acoustic isolation from other rooms. Innovative HVAC design accommodates the low floor-to-floor height (9’8”) of the building for superior soundproofing and optimal humidity and temperature control.

Exterior renovations to the building reorient the main entrance to face College Avenue, a major thoroughfare on campus, rather than the quadrangle, where the original entry was located. The new façade offers a picturesque interpretation of the original Spanish Mission Style and provides a formal gateway to the campus.

Check out the Photos from the opening event and a multimedia tribute to the Calis, who donated $5M towards the School of Music.

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We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Student Recreation Center, Montclair State University

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My Role: Senior Project Manager for the Local Architect – Involved in the project from concept design through construction and post occupancy.

Owner: Montclair State University

Architect:  RDG Sports / Ecoplan

Contractor: Controlled Construction

Construction Manger: Gilbane

About the Project:

Montclair State University’s Student Recreation Center has been selected as a winner of the Innovative Architecture and Design Award by Recreation Management, a magazine that features and recognizes distinguished sports, recreation, and fitness facilities. The May 2010 issue of Recreation Management recognized the Student Recreation Center as one of nine unique recreation centers across the country that showed outstanding design, and led in solving design problems in innovative ways.

The facility features 78,000 square feet with 10,000 devoted to fitness space, multipurpose court space, jogging/walking track, two multipurpose rooms, two racquetball courts, an indoor six-lane 25-yard pool, locker rooms and administrative offices. Eric Kocher, one of the judges and design principal/sport and recreation specialist with Hastings & Chivetta Architects, says that “exterior architecture within context of the existing campus architecture is excellent. Lobby image is fantastic and departs from most traditional student recreation centers. Views to the city are terrific.”

The second award from this magazine, the Montclair State Student Recreation Center received its first award in 2009 from New Jersey Recreation Association for its “uniqueness in design.”

Read what Recreation Management had to say about Montclair State’s Student Recreation Center in their article.

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We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III, AIA
Registered Architect
Licensed in CT, DC, DE, FL, MD, NJ, NY, PA, VA
I Love My Architect – Facebook
FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
web: http://fc3arch.com


My Personal Architecture Portfolio


Babbio Center


MSU Student Rec Center


MSU Music School


Delaware Welcome Center

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We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.