Ask the Architect: How Will Technology Change the Way We Live in the Future? #ILMA #Architecture #Ideas #Design #Planning


What are some predictions about technologies that will shape our lives in the next 15-20 years?

  • High-rise farms
  • Lab-grown meats
  • Space tourism
  • The colonization of other planets
  • Robots in space and in the workplace
  • Electric vehicles and self-driving cars
  • Robot butlers
  • Roads over rivers
  • Flying cars
  • Solar panel technology
  • Hyper-fast trains
  • Augmented/Mixed Reality
  • Gesture-based computing
  • Wearable screens
  • Driverless Trucks
  • 3D printed food
  • 3D printed metal
  • Fridges and appliances that order for you
  • Smart toothbrushes that send data to your dentist
  • Smart mirrors that check your health
  • A toilet that analyses your deposits
  • 5G mobile connectivity
  • Light Fidelity runs wireless communications that travel at very high speeds. With Li-Fi, your light blub is essentially your router.
  • Exo-Skeletons
  • Recycling and re-engineering
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Robot soldiers
  • Healthcare Nanobots
  • Cloud gaming without machines

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


WELL Communities: Health & Wellness Lifestyle

Architects need to continue to consider healthy living when designing private and public spaces.  According to the sources cited below, the Well Living Lab aims to answer critical questions to make homes, offices and independent living environments healthier places. That means indoor environments could be altered to reduce stress and increase comfort, performance and sleep.

By understanding the interplay of elements such as sound, lighting, temperature and air quality, indoor spaces may be altered to address people’s specific and overall health needs. And by understanding how people’s behavior is shaped by their physical environment, facilities can be designed to maximize positive health habits and reduce negative influences. This ambitious three-year research plan is the start toward transforming human health and well-being in indoor environments.

(Source: http://welllivinglab.com)

Well-1

What is a WELL Community?

WELL community functions to protect health and well-being across all aspects of community life. The vision for a WELL community is inclusive, integrated, and resilient, fostering high levels of social engagement.

Air

Facilitates ambient air quality with strategies to reduce traffic pollution and reduce exposure to pollution.

Water

Encourages drinking water quality, public sanitation, and facilities provisions with strategies managing contaminated water on a systems scale and strategies to promote drinking water access.

Nourishment

Facilitates fruit and vegetable access, availability and affordability with policies to reduce the availability of processed foods and providing nutritional information and nutrition education. Also includes strategies for food advertising and promotion, food security, food safety and breastfeeding support.

Light

Supports maintained illuminance levels for roads and walkways and strategies for limiting light pollution, light trespass, glare and discomfort avoidance.

Fitness

Integrates environmental design and operational strategies to reduce the risk of transportation-related injuries, mixed land use and connectivity, walkability, cyclist infrastructure, infrastructure to encourage active transportation and strategies to promote daily physical activity and exercise.

Temperature

Facilitates strategies to reduce heat island effect with policies to deal with extreme temperatures and manage sun exposure and ultraviolet risk.

Sound

Facilitates noise exposure assessment with planning for acoustics, techniques to reduce sound propagation and hearing health education.

Materials

Supports strategies to reduce exposure to hazardous chemical substances in cases of uncontrolled/accidental release and contaminated sites and to limit use of hazardous chemicals in landscaping and outdoor structures.

Mind

Provides access to mental health care, substance abuse and addiction services and access to green spaces.

Community

Supports health impact assessments, policies that address the social determinants of health, health promotion programming, policies that foster social cohesion, community identity and empowerment, crime prevention through environmental design, policies and planning for community disaster and emergency preparedness.

(Source: https://www.wellcertified.com)

Further Reading: You Know LEED, But Do You Know WELL?

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


X Factor of Design

Better design, better experience

The design of physical space proves to have a significant, quantifiable impact on the quality of people’s experience.

Experience FrameworkEveryone is doing everything, everywhere

The traditional uses of space are blurring. People are working, eating, socializing, exercising, having fun, taking classes, and shopping everywhere.

Single-use spaces are becoming obsolete

People who do more than one activity in a place rate their experiences significantly higher and are more likely to report it as their “favorite place.”

Gensler-Hyundai-HQ

Gensler’s Hyundai HQ

Ignore social space at your peril

Places that support community and social connection perform better—from higher job satisfaction in the workplace, to a greater likelihood of recommendation for retail stores and public spaces.

In-between time isn’t wasted time

People who take time to reflect and unplug have better experiences, with direct business benefits: employees are more satisfied, and customers frequently end up making purchases despite not originally intending to do so. College campuses have a way of encouraging intellectual pursuits in different places by making better use of real estate by equipping in-between spaces. Adding wireless connectivity, comfortable seating, and room to spread out your work and almost any space becomes useful work space.

Technology matters, but not in the way you think

Technology may be more about impression than direct engagement— people see it as a powerful symbol of innovation.Gensler's Experience Framework Wheel

The multipurpose space should be able to handle several forms of technology, just like any large lecture hall or classroom. Video, data, and electrical outlets should be spaced along the perimeter of the space, as well as at the edge of the stage. A sound system, video projection system, and cable and satellite capability also should be available. Also, operationally, users will need to know how to use the equipment properly.

Every place and space today is ultimately competing on the experience it delivers. As a new generation of consumers shifts spending and attention toward experience-based consumption, the need to deliver a differentiated experience has never been stronger. The human experience must be the driving force behind every element of a space—from the design of physical space to the qualities of interaction, expectation, and intention.

(Source: https://www.gensler.com/uploads/document/552/file/Gensler-Experience-Index-2017.pdf)

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Internet of Spaces

SpaceThe connectivity concept resonates way beyond the mobile device and the digital screen; it transcends all kind of environments: body, home, city, industry and the environment. If we chose, the connectivity phenomenon could take us to a far more interesting place: connected spaces.

Consider everything that can be connected in a space: it’s far more than connecting wearable devices and phones to a few gadgets or screens. It is about a fundamental change in the information flow direction. Most of us have some kind of device, most of them with some level of connectivity capability. Environments can detect our devices and react to them on many different levels. The more connected spaces are, the more information is available, and so devices can react better, faster and more accurately.

The beauty about this fundamentally different way of thinking about connectivity, is that it makes our environments, our urban spaces, work harder for us. It can power completely new ways to interact with our environment; interactions that go beyond the screen, wearables and simple connected “things”.

Connected spaces can truly change the way we interact with our world. As the intersection between the digital and the physical continues to blur, our environments could really start to create more accurate, engaging and useful experiences. Buildings detecting our presence, querying our phones for details we want to publicly share, tapping into public services and welcoming us with the right information. Stores could completely change the way they serve their customers. Restaurants could provide the correct menus to people according to their diet preferences or known allergies.

201603-raman-figure1
Here is where the power of information and data will make a real difference. Adaptive environments will be able to retrieve and use contextual, relevant, timely and accurate information to interact with us. Spaces will adapt to people, from groups to individuals, contextually and appropriately. The experience a brand can provide to their consumers from this angle exceeds anything that we currently have through the digital screen and the mobile device. A good example of this approach is 2014 Coachella Music Festival, where Spotify partnered with organizers to create connected space experience with the #WeWereThere campaign.

Connected spaces will rely on a myriad of connectivity protocols, platforms and technologies. Native applications, web experiences, lighting, sound, environment, architecture – all will be a part of the connected experience. As a result, agencies and brands will need to diversify and work with interdisciplinary teams across different environments, platforms and technologies.

Sources & References: 

https://www.theguardian.com/media-network/2015/feb/05/connected-spaces-should-be-the-next-step-for-the-internet-of-things)

https://iot.ieee.org/newsletter/march-2016/the-internet-of-space-ios-a-future-backbone-for-the-internet-of-things.html

https://www.virgin.com/entrepreneur/how-internet-things-will-change-our-spaces

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Not ready to start using Building Information Modeling? Try AutoCAD 2013 Free Trial

Not ready to start using Building Information Modeling?

Autodesk provides several native Mac products for 3D modeling, rendering, and animation, visual effects, and digital imagery.

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Design and shape the world around you with AutoCAD® for Mac® software. Explore your ideas and share data seamlessly while working in a native Mac environment.
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Download AutoCAD Trial of design and documentation software for 2D and 3D CAD
Download a 30-day trial of AutoCAD® design and documentation software for 2D and 3D CAD

  • Document— Speed projects from concept to completion with documentation capabilities that create your designs faster than ever before
  • Connect—Import and aggregate models from a variety of applications, and access your designs from almost anywhere with Autodesk 360 cloud computing platform
  • Customize—Customize your AutoCAD experience with a programming interface and Autodesk Exchange Apps
  • Unlock the power of AutoCAD when used as a part of AutoCAD Design Suite, the optimal solution to create and showcase your designs

Free Trial Details

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First Name:
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FAQs

What are some of the new features of AutoCAD 2013?
The latest AutoCAD version offers new tools for design aggregation, connectivity with Autodesk 360 cloud computing platform, and access to hundreds of apps.
 AutoCAD 2013 Product Brochure

What are the key capabilities of AutoCAD Design Suite?
AutoCAD Design Suite enables you to do more with AutoCAD software with tools to capture scanned documents, sketch design concepts, and showcase designs with amazing 3D renderings.
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How do I know which AutoCAD Design Suite is for me?
AutoCAD Design Suite is available in three editions—standard, premium, and ultimate—to fit your workflow. Compare the functionality of each edition.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


REVIT 2013

System Requirements

For Autodesk Revit 2013, Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013, Autodesk Revit MEP 2013, Autodesk Revit Structure 2013

Minimum: Entry-Level Configuration

Description Requirement
Operating System* Microsoft® Windows®7 32-bit

  • Enterprise
  • Ultimate
  • Professional
  • Home Premium

Microsoft® Windows® XP SP2 (or later)

  • Professional
  • Home
Browser Microsoft® Internet Explorer® 7.0 (or later)
CPU Type Single- or Multi-Core Intel® Pentium®, Xeon®, or i-Series processor or AMD® equivalent with SSE2 technology. Highest affordable CPU speed rating recommended.Autodesk® Revit® software products will use multiple cores for many tasks, using up to 16 cores for near-photorealistic rendering operations.
Memory 4 GB RAM

  • Usually sufficient for a typical editing session for a single model up to approximately 100 MB on disk. This estimate is based on internal testing and customer reports. Individual models will vary in their use of computer resources and performance characteristics.
  • Models created in previous versions of Revit software products may require more available memory for the one-time upgrade process.
  • /3GB RAM switch not recommended. Revit software and system stability can be affected by memory conflicts with video drivers when the /3GB switch is active.
Video Display 1,280 x 1,024 with true color
Video Adapter Basic Graphics:
Display adapter capable of 24-bit colorAdvanced Graphics:
DirectX® 10 capable graphics card with Shader Model 3 as recommended by Autodesk.
Hard Disk 5 GB free disk space
Pointing Device MS-Mouse or 3Dconnexion® compliant device
Media Download or installation from DVD9 or USB key
Connectivity Internet connection for license registration and prerequisite component download

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Value: Balanced Price and Performance

Description Requirement
Operating System* Microsoft Windows 7 64-bit

  • Enterprise
  • Ultimate
  • Professional
  • Home Premium
Browser Internet Explorer 7.0 (or later)
CPU Type Multi-Core Intel Xeon, or i-Series processor or AMD equivalent with SSE2 technology. Highest affordable CPU speed rating recommended.Revit products will use multiple cores for many tasks, using up to 16 cores for near-photorealistic rendering operations.
Memory 8 GB RAM

  • Usually sufficient for a typical editing session for a single model up to approximately 300 MB on disk. This estimate is based on internal testing and customer reports. Individual models will vary in their use of computer resources and performance characteristics.
  • Models created in previous versions of Revit software products may require more available memory for the one-time upgrade process.
Video Display 1,680 x 1,050 with true color
Video Adapter DirectX® 10 capable graphics card with Shader Model 3 as recommended by Autodesk.
Hard Disk 5 GB free disk space
Pointing Device MS-Mouse or 3Dconnexion compliant device
Media Download or installation from DVD9 or USB key
Connectivity Internet connection for license registration and prerequisite component download

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Performance: Large, Complex Models

Description Requirement
Operating System* Microsoft Windows 7 64-bit

  • Enterprise
  • Ultimate
  • Professional
  • Home Premium
Browser Internet Explorer 7.0 (or later)
CPU Type Multi-Core Intel Xeon, or i-Series processor or AMD equivalent with SSE2 technology. Highest affordable CPU speed rating recommended.Revit products will use multiple cores for many tasks, using up to 16 cores for near-photorealistic rendering operations.
Memory 16 GB RAM

  • Usually sufficient for a typical editing session for a single model up to approximately 700 MB on disk. This estimate is based on internal testing and customer reports. Individual models will vary in their use of computer resources and performance characteristics.
  • Models created in previous versions of Revit software products may require more available memory for the one-time upgrade process.
Video Display 1,920 x 1,200 or higher with true color
Video Adapter DirectX 10 capable graphics card with Shader Model 3 as recommended by Autodesk.
Hard Disk
  • 5 GB free disk space
  • 10,000+ RPM (for Point Cloud interactions)
Pointing Device MS-Mouse or 3Dconnexion compliant device
Media Download or installation from DVD9 or USB key
Connectivity Internet connection for license registration and prerequisite component download

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For Autodesk Revit Server 2013

Description Requirement
Operating System
  • Microsoft® Windows Server® 2008 64-bit
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 64-bit
Web Server Microsoft® Internet Information Server 7.0 (or later)
< 100 Concurrent Users
(multiple models)
Minimum Value Performance
CPU Type 4+ cores
2.6 GHz+
6+ cores
2.6 GHz+
6+ cores
3.0 GHz+
Memory 4 GB RAM 8 GB RAM 16 GB RAM
Hard Drive 7,200+ RPM 10,000+ RPM 15,000+ RPM
100 + Concurrent Users
(multiple models)
Minimum Value Performance
CPU Type 4+ cores
2.6 GHz+
6+ cores
2.6 GHz+
6+ cores
3.0 GHz+
Memory 8 GB RAM 16 GB RAM 32 GB RAM
Hard Drive 10,000+ RPM 15,00+ RPM High-Speed RAID Array
100 + Concurrent Users
(multiple models)
VMware® and Hyper-V® Support (See Revit Server Administrator’s Guide)

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Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013 for Citrix **
Autodesk Revit MEP 2013 for Citrix **
Autodesk Revit Structure 2013 for Citrix **

Description Requirement
Citrix System
  • XenApp® 6.0 or 6.5
  • Citrix® License Manager
  • Citrix® Profile Manager
Authentication
  • Microsoft® Active Directory
    • Roaming Profiles supported
License Server Dedicated Autodesk license server for session-specific licenses
Client OS
  • Microsoft Windows XP SP2 (or later)
  • Microsoft Windows XP Professional x64 Edition SP2
  • Microsoft Windows 7 32-bit
  • Microsoft Windows 7 64-bit
Client Browser
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 7 (or later)
User Access Client computers should be bound to the network domain. Each client computer should have either the full Citrix® or web client plug-in installed. Users should use their domain logins to access both the Citrix web console and the LAN.

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*Learn more about using Autodesk® Revit® Architecture 2013, Autodesk® Revit® MEP 2013, Autodesk® Revit® Structure 2013, and Autodesk Revit® 2013 software with Boot Camp®, part of Mac OS® X that enables you to install and run Microsoft Windows (and Windows-based applications) on a Mac® computer or with Parallels Desktop®, a system utility available from Parallels, Inc. that enables you to run applications in each operating system without restarting your computer.

**Revit Architecture 2013, Revit MEP 2013, and Revit Structure 2013 software products are Citrix Ready™ Applications. Disclaimer: The Citrix application is network-based and performance of Autodesk Citrix Ready Applications may vary with network performance. These Autodesk Revit software products do not include the Citrix application, nor does Autodesk provide direct support for issues with the Citrix application. Users should contact Citrix directly with questions related to procurement and operation of the Citrix application.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


A Few Things to Consider While Designing

Most of the following items can be inter-related and juxtaposed.  This is not intended to be a comprehensive list or listed in any priority.  It is a list of things to think about (and talk about with your designer) when you find yourself designing your next project.

A.)      Program/Use  

  1. What are you designing?
  2. For whom are you designing?
  3. Are there any important relationships between the various “program” spaces?
  4. What are the project constraints – cost, site, schedule, users, etc.?
  5. Is there a defining thought – a certain look, feel, sense of place; that needs to be defined?
  6. The “space” created for the program informs the Form & Aesthetics of the space as well as the Context where it resides.

B.)      Context/Site

  1. Where is It?
  2. Think: Location, Location, Location (like City vs Rural).
  3. Solar Orientation – Where does the sun rise and set? Which way is North?
  4. What are some the adjacent natural and manmade site features?
  5. Where do the winds come from, the shade, the sun, water elements/features, are there existing trees and/or vegetation that need to be considered.
  6. Utilities – How are basic needs met? (Think: water, plumbing, electricity, sanitary waste, domestic waste, and connectivity to outside world, i.e., internet and other telecommunication).

C.)      Form/Aesthetics

  1. Scale, Proportion, OrderThoughtfulness of scale.
  2. Think outside the plan, elevation, and sections – How does the space look/feel in perspective, the way one moves through the space?
  3. Think: When you enter a traditional Roman Church the entrance (narthex) is typically low making the entrance into the vaulted nave more dramatic.
  4. Materials (inside and outside). Local materials indigenous to the project site?
  5. Texture – The texture and “feel” can define the interior and exterior of a space.
  6. Color – How does color or lack of color define the space.  Is the color applied or is it part of the natural materials?
  7. Image – What are the defining elements of the design?  The façade?
  8. Structure – How will the space be defined?  What type of materials will be used? What type of structure will be used (Bearing Walls vs Columns, etc.).

D.)      Other Factors

  1. The Client – Ultimately (right or wrong) the clients basic needs need to be met (especially if there is a written contract).
  2. Societal Benefits (Questions like are we doing the right thing are important!!!)
  3. The Earth/Environment

For example:

  • How does the program, site/context and Form/Aesthetics impact the local and global environment?
  • How do the decisions made above impact the environment?
  • Transportation – labor and materials.
  • Is there a way to reduce the size of the “space” or “spaces” – Smaller footprints and volumes result in less energy use (Think: HVAC, Electrical, Plumbing services/systems).

Click here for some more ideas on design.

Sincerely,
@FrankCunhaIII