Augmented Reality Enables Children to Learn in the Real World #ilmaBlog #Education #VR #Technology #Classroom #MyUniversityArchitect #Architect

MBDs (Mobile broadband devices, or smartphones) allow students to access and collect additional information and clues. Students use EcoMOBILE activities developed with an augmented reality application, to navigate between “hotspots,” view information, answer questions, and observe virtual media overlaid on the physical pond.

Students can capture pictures, video, or voice recordings and take these back to the classroom to help make sense of school lessons. Through augmented reality we provide students with visualizations that would not otherwise be apparent in the natural environment (for example, virtual x-ray vision so that they can “see” a virtual carbon atom as it moves through the processes of photosynthesis and respiration).

These augmented reality experiences allow students to conceptualize and discuss processes and complex relationships that are otherwise difficult to describe or visualize.

We would love to hear from you about what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


The @FelicianoCenter’s @MIXLabDesign Design Charrette for “B.E.L.A.” Summer High School Program Entailing the Redevelopment of a Significant Urban Historic Site #UrbanPlanning #Redevelopment #Business #Entrepreneur #Education #HighSchool #DesignThink #Innovation #NJEd @MontclairStateU

On July 9, 2019, in the capacity of University Architect at Montclair State University (and Alumni of the Feliciano School of Business). I had the privilege of participating in a design charrette with a local high school. The project consists of an urban redevelopment site with a precious historical building at the site. I was invited by the people who run the Montclair State University MIX Lab (Feliciano Center for Entrepreneurship), an interdisciplinary hub for transformative innovation, and digitally mediated making.

M.I.X. stands for Making and Innovating for X, where X is the unknown, that which exceeds our grasp, the future, and the open-ended nature of creativity, good design and big problems. The co-directors of MIX Lab are Iain Kerr, associate professor of Innovation Design, and Jason Frasca, entrepreneurship instructor.

I graciously accepted Jason and Ian’s invitation to participate as a guest critic along with another fellow professional, Frank Gerard Godlewski of Fellsbridge Studio LLC, who specializes in historic preservation in the area where the redevelopment project is located.  The format for the design charrette, hosted by the MIX Lab for the high school program led by high school teacher, Kevin Richburg, included: (1) The students, in groups of 4-5, presented their concepts for the redevelopment of the site (there were 5 teams); (2) the guest critics gave suggestions and further thoughts on how to further explore and develop the student’s ideas; (3) the guest critics summed up their thoughts for all the students with key take-aways.  The following is a recap of what I learned from the students (in so far as what is the most significant to them) and the key take-aways I offered the students (in no particular order of importance) from my perspective as an Architect who has been involved in the planning, design and construction of projects over the past 20-years.

What the Student Teams Focused on as Key Ideas for their Projects:

  • Historic preservation of the existing building
  • Connecting with local community
  • Local and state pride
  • Affordability
  • Sustainability
  • Celebration of diversity and inclusion
  • Love of the arts
  • Focus on the user “experience”
  • Spaces for families to enjoy
  • Entertainment
  • Accessibility to quality food and goods
  • Mixing of “Bright and Bold” historic and modern elements
  • Transformative
  • “Modern” vibe

Proposed Amenities of the Re-Development Site:

  • Supermarkets (one group proposed a two-story whole sale supermarket)
  • Open-air markets (farmer markets, etc.)
  • Retail, restaurants, food trucks
  • Open space, a square or plaza
  • Parking for visitors (possible tunnel or bridge)
  • Parking at perimeter

Types of Buildings (Programmed Spaces)

  • Main historic building’s exterior appearance
  • Main historic building’s exterior appearance
  • Explore modernization of existing historic building interior to suite new uses
  • Mixed use buildings with green roofs and roof top patios
  • Modern, light and transparent
  • Restaurants and sports bars
  • Entertainment – bowling alley, arcade, movie theater
  • Arts – Museum showcasing tradition and innovation
  • Grocery stores
  • Food trucks
  • Retail
  • Technology/electronics-based retail
  • Main historic building’s exterior appearance
  • Explore modernization of existing historic building interior to suite new uses
  • Mixed use buildings with green roofs and roof top patios
  • Modern, light and transparent
  • Restaurants and sports bars
  • Entertainment – bowling alley, arcade, movie theater
  • Arts – Museum showcasing tradition and innovation
  • Grocery stores
  • Food trucks
  • Retail
  • Technology/electronics-based retail

Types of Exterior Spaces

  • Open spaces with green lawns and fountains
  • Places to reflect and remember
  • ·Field with stage and seating
  • Outdoor seating for restaurants
  • Areas to relax

Key Take-Aways & Ideas for Further Exploration:

  • Site plans – Delineate site elements separately from building elements (so easier to comprehend) using color or graphics (Example)
  • Floor plans – Delineate building areas/rooms with designated color so it is easier to understand program of spaces (i.e., circulation vs apartments vs retail vs support spaces, etc.) (Example)
  • Work together as a team – commemorate each other’s strengths but give everyone credit even those whose work may be behind the scenes
  • Focus on one main idea (let other ideas support the one main theme)
  • Context and Scale – Observe and learn from the surrounding community; apply those elements to the proposed project so that it complements the adjoining communities
  • Materials – Understand how the new materials can complement the historic ones (let the original historic building stand on its own and celebrate its historical significance)
  • Consider “big box” retail versus the Local “pop ups” (gentrification good and bad)
  • Parking/Transportation – As mass transportation has changed from ships to locomotives to buses and cars; look to the future as the world heads to autonomous vehicles (particularly China).  If parking is required think about how a parking lot or parking garage can be transformed in the future.  Example
  • Sustainability is important but do not forget to consider W.E.L.L. as well.  LEED/Sustainability concepts Resource 1 ; Resource 2 also check out the following link for ides about other program types for the redevelopment project Resource 3
  • Consider more technology in your projects, for instance: Smart CitiesAR/VR, and other innovate concepts, like: Immersive Experience and Virtual reality in theme park attractions. Also consider utilizing QR Codes as a teaching tool.
  • Consider developing a pedestrian mall by converting an existing street into a pedestrian friendly zone like they have done in Jersey City, NJ or Times Square, New York City, NY or Fremont Street Experience in Downtown Las Vegas, NV, the taking cars, trucks and buses off the street and giving the spaces back to the pedestrians who can enjoy it (also it would make the entire site one big site instead of two separate parcels dived by thru traffic).
  • Lastly, and not least important, when considering injecting modern elements with historic architecture, it must be considered whether the original is to remain intact or be altered.  There are interesting examples of tasteful alterations, however, the older I get the less comfortable I am with injecting new with old for the sake of “shock” value (where as a student of architecture 20 years ago the concept was more appealing).  I reminded the students of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France, and the ensuing debate that is going on whether or not the renovations/upgrades should be true to the original or whether the new design should be bold and innovating and perhaps less true to the original.  Whether the designers choose to go in one direction or another much thought should be given to preserving the historical elements of our precious structures because they are irreplaceable (think Grand Central Station in New York City, NY, which acted as a catalyst for the preservation movement).  Click here to read about the history of the Preservation Battle of Grand Central Station.

Overall, I was impressed by the talent and creativity of all the students and I was pleased with the quality of their presentations. I hope I was able to contribute in some small way to the success of their respective projects.  The high school student participants’ contributions to the build environment would be welcomed by the design and construction industry, since the students are willing to understand and develop their skills in the area of deep thought, innovation, design, construction and socio-economic concepts at an early age.  I gladly encouraged each and every one of them by letting them know that if they choose a career in architecture, engineering, real-estate development, construction or related field that they would certainly all be able to achieve their goals based on their willingness and eagerness to learn and present their visions and concepts.   I hope my involvement was as rewarding for the students as it was for me.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


@FrankCunhaIII Speaking at EAST COAST GREEN on June 21, 2019 About Sustainability at College Campuses #UniversityArchitect #Campus #GreenArchitect #Eco #ilmaBlog

Network, Learn, & be Inspired by the Living Building Challenge certified Willow School, hosting AIA-NJ’s 9th annual East Coast Green conference 6/21.

Want to see a rainwater catchment system that flushes all toilets, solar energy that provides 100% of a building’s power, healthy materials, design for optimal daylight and fresh air and a sustainable managed site that includes a man-made wetland to treat all waste onsite and a lush variety of gardens instead of lawn?

4 Education tracks in Energy, Human Experience, Materials, and Certifications provide continuing education credits throughout the day. Join us and mingle with Architects, Interior Designers, Engineers, Building Owners, Contractors and related industry professionals.

Local/organic breakfast, lunch and evening reception with open bar (beer/wine) included! www.eastcoast-green.com Sponsorship and registration available!

Click on the links below for more information about East Coast Green

Speakers: https://eastcoast-green.com/speakers 

Schedule of Events: https://eastcoast-green.com/schedule/


New Jersey Higher Education Partnership for Sustainability Point of Intervention Tour

The Point of Intervention Tour (POI) hosted by the Post-Landfill Action Network (PLAN) is challenging our consumption economy and spreading the message that “Nobody Can Do Everything, But Everybody Can Do Something.” Learn more about the Post Landfill Action Network’s Point of Intervention at several upcoming campus events.

POI will be visiting Montclair State University (Friday, April 12th),Ramapo College (Monday April 15), and Kean

University (Tuesday April 16). At these locations, you’ll find zero-waste workshops and educational presentations about how to get involved in the zero-waste campaign.  

Montclair State University’s 2019 Earth Day event, themed “Passport to Sustainability,” is partnered with the New Jersey Higher Education Partnership for Sustainability (NJHEPS) and PSEG Institute for Sustainability Studies (PSEGISS). This event is aimed to inspire a student led zero-waste movement and collectively realize individual skills in order to solve our Linear Consumption Economy issue. During the event we will celebrate Earth Day with a fair involving campus-wide clubs, organizations and departments, educational workshops and guest speakers.
Together we can take action on the waste issue with sustainable, replicable initiatives!

These events are free and open to the public.
When and Where:

  • April 12, 2019 – Montclair State University
  • April 15, 2019 – Ramapo College of New Jersey
  • April 16, 2019 – Kean University

Help share the word by forwarding this email to others who may be interested in this engaging event.

We would love to hear from you about what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook


Immersive Experience in Architecture

VR-HeroPotential uses for VR and AR in architectural design are not science fiction fantasy.

New VR devices allow designers and clients inside conceptual designs. We simply load a VR device with a three-dimensional rendering of a space, and let the user experience it virtually. These VR experiences are far more effective than two-dimensional renderings at expressing the look and feel of a design. VR allows our clients to make better-educated assessments of the total sensory experience and the small details of our design. VR is helping us bridge the divide between our ideas and our clients’ perception of them, letting us effectively simulate our designs before a single nail is driven, part is molded or footing is poured. Our existing modeling programs let us render views in VR devices that are single point-of-view. The user gets to look around from that point and immerse themselves in 360-degree views. Needless to say, the ability to experience spaces before they’re paid for and built increases clients’ peace of mind about their investments.
(Source: https://www.archdaily.com/872011/will-virtual-reality-transform-the-way-architects-design)

While conversational interfaces are changing how people control the digital world,
virtual, augmented and mixed reality are changing the way that people perceive and
interact with the digital world. The virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) market is currently adolescent and fragmented. Interest is high, resulting in many novelty VR applications that deliver little real business value outside of advanced entertainment, such as video games and 360-degree spherical videos. To drive real tangible business benefit, enterprises must examine specific real-life scenarios where VR and AR can be applied to make employees more productive and enhance the design, training and visualization processes. (Source: https://www.gartner.com)
VR-Architect
Mixed reality, a type of immersion that merges and extends the technical functionality of
both AR and VR, is emerging as the immersive experience of choice providing a
compelling technology that optimizes its interface to better match how people view and
interact with their world. Mixed reality exists along a spectrum and includes head-
mounted displays (HMDs) for augmented or virtual reality as well as smartphone and
tablet-based AR and use of environmental sensors. Mixed reality represents the span of
how people perceive and interact with the digital world. (Source: https://www.gartner.com)

VR has already excelled in one area of the travel industry, in what’s been termed as ‘try
before you fly’ experiences – giving prospective tourists a chance to see their potential
destinations before booking their trip. Virgin Holidays have created Virgin Holidays
Virtual Holidays using VR and have seen a rise in sales to one of their key destinations.
In terms of creating these experiences from a design perspective, technology is both a
help and a hindrance. It’s allowing designers to get to know their audiences better, but
it’s also making it easier for businesses to lose track of the users who will eventually
own or experience the product. (Source: https://www.virgin.com/entrepreneur/how-internet-things-will-change-our-spaces)
VR-Virgin

Immersive Architecture

“Visualization matters. It’s really, really critical that people understand what they’re looking at and can contribute meaningfully to the dialogue. You want experts and non-experts to be able to derive actionable insight from what they’re seeing.”

–Matthew Krissel, Partner at KieranTimberlake

More Information:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
FRANK CUNHA III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

 


The 10 most unusual things we’ve been asked to design so far, What About You? by @WJMArchitect and @FrankCunhaIII

Hope you are enjoying your day,

Every designer has been given some unusual things to design – Here are some of our favorites.

-Bill & Frank

UpsideDownHome

10) “Man –cave” type room for woman called an “Estro-den”.  Like a home office room for sewing, knitting, wet bar, 3 DVR mega video storage with disappearing TV in sewing cabinet.

9) Elevator that took you straight up to the attic “man-cave” from the first floor family room.

8) Office with an exterior door to a Japanese garden at the end of an airport runway.  So quiet you could hear a plane drop.

7) Powder room with mirrors covering every inch of wall surface including the floor and the ceiling.

6) Complete kitchen inside master suite.  Door to master suite could only be opened with a key from either side.  Second marriage for man, first marriage for woman, He had custody of his previous kids.  Kids were hard on the new wife, thus the locking master suite.

5) Recycling chute to drop recyclables from upstairs bedrooms into the basement.

4) Kids fort in attic space above entrance.

3) Design screened room addition for the family cat, with cat door, grass, window shelves for kitty bird observation activities.

2) Underground tunnel from house to garage

1) Kevlar bulletproof glass at counter with shot-gun slot to shoot “would’be” criminals.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Exclusive ILMA Interview with Tara Imani, AIA @Parthenon1 (Part 2)

What better way to ring in the new year than to highlight one of our new designer colleagues discovered on social media?

Tara Imani, AIA, CSI, is a registered architect and owner of Tara Imani Designs, LLC, a solo practice in Texas, focusing on residential renovations, commercial space planning, and architecture. She has been blogging for over a year now, beginning with her debut blog post on AIA KnowledgeNet in October, 2010 where she explored what is now a commonplace question in the field of architecture: “Is the Architecture Profession in Need of a Makeover Despite the Upturn in the Economy?” (<—You can click on the highlighted title to link to the blog and join the conversation).

The Parthenon ruins in Athens. "For complex visual and psychological reasons, it's an extremely powerful building."

The Parthenon ruins in Athens. “For complex visual and psychological reasons, it’s an extremely powerful building.”

Architect Q&A:

11)   Who / what has been your greatest influence in design?

This is a very interesting question because I try not to be defined by a certain style- I consider myself eclectic.  In thinking more deeply about this, I have to say it was my formal education at Ohio State that has by far been the greatest influence on me.  Sub-consciously when I sit down to design, I think about how we would go about solving various design studio problems and what would Professors Doug Graf, John Regan, Ben Gianni or Mas Kinoshita say about “that idea!”  It is incredible to think what an indelible imprint our design professors make on our creative thought processes.  Not to mention the influence of seeing how other students handle certain design problems.  We learn from each other.

Aside from my background, I draw inspiration and learn new ways of doing things by reading various architecture magazines.  But each client and project is different and it is important to respond to the immediate context, specific program needs, and design based on those parameters while addressing the required jurisdictional planning, building, and ADA codes (which are baseline requirements and should be exceeded).

“Every new project is essentially a blank canvas.”
~ Tara Imani, AIA

ILMA-001

12)   Which building type would you like to work on that you haven’t been part of yet?

There are so many building types I have not yet worked on.  I would like to take existing programs and improve them such as Student housing at universities, solving urban and suburban decay, revitalizing neighborhoods, redesigning and adapting existing facilities to new uses.  All of these projects excite me.

I would love to be part of a think tank team that tackles big problems.  I like a challenge and to work with people who want to make a difference and aren’t afraid to try something new.

I’m very entrepreneurial and loved being part of my family’s start-up, creating everything from marketing materials, the company logo, branding our image, hiring new people, determining our core services, implementing new software systems and setting up the daily operations.  Every day was an opportunity to wear many hats.

13)   How do you hope to inspire / mentor the next generation of Architects?

I was asked to co-author a book on how to become an architect for emerging architects.  This was in August 2011 and I have yet to complete it.  I was gung-ho about the project and had actually been waiting for an opportunity to write such a book.  However, it has proved more difficult than originally anticipated—due to the rapidly changing A/E/C industry (with Revit, a move to BIM, IPD, and changes to LEED including a new International Green Building Code, etc.).  I was concerned that my lack of certain credentials would impede the book from being read.

The industry has changed so much due to technological advances that “seasoned architects” are in a reverse position of needing to be mentored and re-trained ourselves.

It is impossible to lead others without leading one’s self.”
~ Tara Imani, AIA

I get my inspiration and compass directions from architectural thought leaders such as James Cramer, founder of The Design Futures Council and Design Intelligence whose website and publications offer cutting edge information: www.di.net.  And staying active in social media also helps stay current on what other firms are doing- such as Tweet chats hosted by the AIA or reading posts on www.aia.org ‘s Knowledge Net forum—a place where mostly architects go to ask questions and share hard-won wisdom with one another.

And I look to outside sources in other arenas such Twitter where you can interact with such innovative leaders as Tom Peters, Vala Afshar, Lolly Daskal, and Frank Stephens whose thoughts and ideas can inform architecture in ways our otherwise insular profession has not had in the past.

The Louve Museum in Paris featuring IM Pei's glass pyramid at night

The Louve Museum in Paris featuring IM Pei’s glass pyramid at night

14)   What does Architecture mean to you?

This question reminds me of an ongoing conversation/debate we had on AIA’s Knowledge Net site a few years ago where we all tried to define “What is good design?”  Many of us easily fell back on Vitruvius’s Firmness, Commodity, and Delight (my favorite definition to date) while others said “modern” and still others wanted to focus solely on sustainability which, to me, is an underlying aspect that runs through all areas of design and is a pre-requisite consideration in the earliest stages of the design process.

When I hear the world ‘architecture’, I think of beautiful buildings like the Louvre museum in Paris or the Pantheon in Rome.  Architecture is synonymous with Aesthetics and cannot exist without a parti (French word for concept/diagram); a unifying concept/idea that makes sense of the project’s many parts.  This is what sets mere functional buildings with true architecture—that unspoken feeling of sublime awe when you experience a Gothic Cathedral (or so I’m told… I haven’t been to one- yet).

15)   What is your design process?

My design process is iterative.  It starts with meeting with the client and listening to their needs.  Vetting clients is very important and sometimes (even though as they say “beggars can’t be choosers”) it is best to turn down a project if the client refuses to understand the legal requirements of certain tasks or doesn’t have an adequate budget—unless you can assist with a creative solution to help them find a way to build it for less cost or come up with a way to assist them in raising the necessary funds.

“The client needs to respect the design capabilities and experience of the Architect.”
~ Tara Imani, AIA

Once the project goals, budget, scope of services (what I will do), and the fee (most important) is determined and agreed upon, the next step is to get a signed contract and a retainer fee.  Then, it is appropriate to begin to solve the design problem.

Sometimes, it is not possible to accomplish what I just wrote in the above paragraph as clients might be trying to decide if a particular site or lease space will work—in those cases, I can provide the client with a feasibility study for an agreed upon fee.

A lot of factors come into play that some clients might not be aware of—building codes differ by jurisdiction, fire codes are critical to comply with, occupancy loads are determined by square footages and use, construction budgets will be stretched.  It’s not a matter of merely “drawing up a set of floor plans”.  It’s a matter of orchestrating a confluence of design factors and meeting client expectations.

photo 2

16)   If you could not be an Architect, what would you be?

This is another intriguing question.  For years I was driven by a need to make others around me happy.  This led to being at everyone else’s beck and caw while ignoring my own needs.  It’s a delicate balance to pursue worthy goals without being selfish.

To answer your question more directly: I would like to be a writer or an actor.  I also enjoy dancing and the performing arts, so being an entertainer or speaker would be fun.

I feel I can do anything I set my mind to.

I’ve already mentioned some of my pursuits in play as a child; some of the other interests I had were creative writing, espionage, and organizing messy rooms/drawers/closets (even if it was someone else’s house).

Funny fact about me: At age 34 or so- when I was having a moment of frustration in the family business- I decided I would pursue my hidden desire to be a spy, so I called the FBI and asked them if they were hiring. LOL!  I really did that.  They said yes, they were but that the maximum age to train a new agent was 36.  I did the math and thought that it was too late to do that.  Naturally, I thought of the next thing: being a private detective.  So I opened the Yellow Pages and called a few (there are only a few listed anyway) and got an interview with one.  He was an older, handsome man much like the TV character Matlock.  Without looking at my resume or discussing anything, he looked directly at me across his big wooden brown desk and simply got right to the point and said, “Miss, you don’t want to want to be a Private Detective.” Insert uncomfortable pause. “Trust me.”

Of course, I was not satisfied with his answer. I needed to know specifically why:  Would I have to carry a gun?  Was he ever shot at? I think I asked him if the job required having to sneak around dark alleys at 3:00 a.m.

Well, he wasn’t specific in his responses other than to shake his head yes to all of the above and more.  I could tell his mind was made up so I took his advice and forsook any notions of suburban espionage.

17)   What is your dream project?

I would love to work on a Hollywood set although I’ve heard the pace is maddening.  My dream project is actually writing a book about Julia Morgan and having it made into a screenplay that I would get to co-direct.  I envision it as an epic period piece along the lines of ‘Titanic’ spanning her whole life- like a series- and showing to the finest detail what life was like for women in 1893 Paris when Julia was accepted on her third attempt into the L’Ecole des Beaux Arts.  I’ve envisioned various actresses playing her role from Julia Roberts to Angelina Jolie.  I think John Goodman or Brad Pitt would make a great William Randolph Hearst (Julia’s lifelong client).  So, it sounds like a match made in Heaven!

Click here to read Part 1 of this interview.

Tara’s Contact Info:

Tara Imani Designs 10333 Richmond Avenue, Suite 150 Houston, Texas 77042 Ph: (832) 723-1798 Fax: (832) 300-3230 Email: Tara@TaraImaniDesigns.com

The Villa Almerico-Capra (The Rotunda) by Palladio

The Villa Almerico-Capra (The Rotunda) by Palladio

Also Check Out:

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

2013 is going to be great ~ Sending you lots of love, hope, peace, health, happiness and prosperity! 

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Most Innovative Companies – #Architecture by @FastCompany

by Linda Tischler (additional reporting by Zachary Wilson)

1. Diller Scofidio + Renfro
The New York-based firm transformed public space in Manhattan last year with the renovation of Alice Tully Hall, the master plan for the redevelopment of Lincoln Center, and the opening of the High Line, a collaboration with Field Operations. DS+R beat out several high-profile architects for its next project, Rio de Janeiro’s $31 million Museum of Image and Sound, on Copacabana Beach. Top 50: No. 32

2. MVRDV
Netherlands-based MVRDV has been preaching radical theories of vertical living for years, and they’re now beginning to catch on. Current projects include the Rotterdam Market Hall, which will house more than 200 apartments and a large public market; the firm’s daring Gwanggyo Power Center, a set of hill-like structures for 77,000 residents in South Korea, is in the final planning stages. Top 50: No. 44

3. SHoP Architects
Winners of the 2009 Cooper-Hewitt award for design, SHoP collaborates with material manufacturers and trade contractors during the design phase to reduce client spending and ensure that buildings get built. The firm’s upcoming projects include Brooklyn’s Barclays Center (the sports stadium in the controversial Atlantic Yards project) and the Fashion Institute of Technology’s C2 tower in Manhattan.

4. Shigeru Ban
In his quest to get rid of material prejudices, Japanese architect Shigeru Ban has used everything from steel and plastic to paper and cardboard in his work. Case in point: the sweeping, netlike roof of the Metz Centre Pompidou in Metz, France, with its 1,800 unique steel beams (scheduled to open in May), or the 72-foot-tall paper tower installation made from hundreds of compressed cardboard tubes at London Design Week in 2009.

5. Office dA
This Boston-based design duo won two major projects last year: one with a sharp, razorlike design for the University of Melbourne architecture school, in Australia, and another for the University of Toronto’s Daniels architecture school, which uses high-performance environmental elements in the facade and aims for LEED Gold status.

6. Olson Kundig Architects
Shortening its name from Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects in January reflects the firm’s approach to architecture: keep it down-to-earth and sustainable. The Seattle-based firm received the AIA Architecture Firm Award from the American Institute of Architects in 2009 for a decade of work. Current projects include the offices for steel fabricator T Bailey Inc., which appropriately uses large pipes as architectural elements, and the Lightcatcher building for Bellingham, Washington’s Whatcom Museum, a 180-foot-long building that captures sunlight and is the state’s first LEED Silver building.

7. Adjaye Associates
The 43-year-old Tanzanian-born architect beat the likes of Henry Cobb and Norman Foster with his stacked stone walls and skylight-heavy design for the new National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.; the museum is scheduled to open in 2015. His Moscow School of Management in Russia will be completed this year, although students started using the complex in 2009.

8. KieranTimberlake
The environmentally minded Philadelphia firm partnered with LivingHomes to design module-based prefab homes that are manufactured in a factory and can be assembled on-site in one day. The homes are LEED-certified and feature solar panels, recycled wood-and-bamboo siding, and automatic ventilation systems, among other features.

9. Santiago Calatrava
His World Trade Center Transportation Hub in New York has been scaled back for budgetary reasons, and the proposed 2,000-foot Chicago Spire has been stalled for lack of funding, but in 2009, the Spanish architect opened a swooping transit station in Liege, Belgium, and the Samuel Beckett Bridge, in Dublin.

10. Field Operations
James Corner’s New York-based landscape architecture firm led the design team that transformed the High Line, an abandoned elevated railway track on Manhattan’s west side, into a wildly successful public park. Up next: revitalizing Philadelphia’s Race Street Pier.

Click here to see the rest of the story.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Sophia is Fine (Art) – @SophiaFine

I wanted to share one of my dearest Twitter supporters and friends, Sophia Fine who is a Fine Arts graduate.  She successfully completed her independent studies in Florence, Italy and was recognized and awarded for her contributions to Literature and Drama. Now she is well-respected in the art-community and is involved in various art shows, solo expositions, and selling her original artwork both in America and overseas.  Click here for more on Sophia and how to contact her online if you are interested in her artwork.

Can You tell us about Your Process.

I came from a Beautiful World, which presented itself to me early in life. Art was always within me, in so many ways, in everything I saw and touched. I feel like a creator of Expressive Beautiful things, as if God Touched me.

Creativity! Yes! Art is a great Gift! I aim to transform my visions and feelings into my Art.

I create happiness. I can’t wait to go to my studio, express myself, and make things happen. Sometimes I pour the Colors on an Empty Canvas and before me I see all the things I had in my mind.

I like to create themes, with enchanted realities, dream-like, and with absurd beauty. But never losing the soul communication with the viewer when jostling together colorful compositions that are as jolly as kitsch Postcards from Heaven!

I like to immerse the viewer in the false immobility of life’s turbulence and to render the animated presence of Joy!

Everyone has a space within them that waits to be filled with new, yet unknown excitement.

Read the rest of this entry »


Exeter Library by Louis Kahn

The Phillips Exeter Academy Library in Exeter, New Hampshire, U.S., with 160,000 volumes on nine levels and a shelf capacity of 250,000 volumes, is the largest secondary school library in the world. It is part of the Phillips Exeter Academy, an independent boarding school.

When it became clear in the 1950s that the library had outgrown its existing building, the school initially hired an architect who proposed a traditional design for the new building. Deciding instead to construct a library with a contemporary design, the school gave the commission to Louis Kahn in 1965. In 1997 the library received the Twenty-five Year Award from the American Institute of Architects, an award that recognizes architecture of enduring significance that is given to no more than one building per year.

Kahn structured the library in three concentric square rings. The outer ring, which is built of load-bearing brick, includes all four exterior walls and the library carrel spaces immediately inside them. The middle ring, which is built of reinforced concrete, holds the heavy book stacks. The inner ring is a dramatic atrium with enormous circular openings in its walls that reveal several floors of book stacks.

Footage from “The Third & The Seventh” project for illustrating Mundos Digitales 2009 conference using 3dsmax, Vray, AE and Premiere.

Main theme soundtrack it’s The Divine Comedy’s “Laika’s Theme” from “Absent Friends” album.



ILMA of the Week: I. M. Pei

20130626-193853.jpg

Ieoh Ming Pei (born April 26, 1917), commonly known as I. M. Pei, is a Chinese American architect often called a master of modern architecture. Born in Canton (Guangzhou) and raised in Hong Kong and Shanghai, Pei drew inspiration at an early age from the gardens at Suzhou. In 1935, he moved to the United States and enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania’s architecture school, but quickly transferred to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was unhappy with the focus at both schools on Beaux-Arts architecture, and spent his free time researching emerging architects, especially Le Corbusier. After graduating, he joined the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) and became friends with the Bauhaus architects Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer. In 1939, he married Eileen Loo, who had introduced him to the GSD community. They have been married for over seventy years, and have four children, including architects Chien Chung “Didi” Pei and Li Chung “Sandi” Pei.

MIT’s architecture faculty was also focused on the Beaux-Arts school, and Pei found himself uninspired by the work. In the library he found three books by the Swiss-French architect Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris, better known as Le Corbusier. Pei was inspired by the innovative designs of the new International style, characterized by simplified form and the use of glass and steel materials. Le Corbusier visited MIT in November 1935, an occasion which powerfully affected Pei: “The two days with Le Corbusier, or ‘Corbu’ as we used to call him, were probably the most important days in my architectural education.” Pei was also influenced by the work of US architect Frank Lloyd Wright. In 1938 he drove to Spring Green, Wisconsin, to visit Wright’s famous Taliesin building. After waiting for two hours, however, he left without meeting Wright.

Le Grand Louvre

20130626-193810.jpg
Pei was acutely aware, as he said, that “the history of Paris was embedded in the stones of the Louvre.”

When François Mitterrand was elected President of France in 1981, he laid out an ambitious plan for a variety of construction projects. One of these was the renovation of the Louvre Museum. Mitterrand appointed a civil servant named Emile Biasini to oversee it. After visiting museums in Europe and the United States, including the US National Gallery, he asked Pei to join the team. The architect made three secretive trips to Paris, to determine the feasibility of the project; only one museum employee knew why he was there. Pei finally agreed that a reconstruction project was not only possible, but necessary for the future of the museum. He thus became the first foreign architect to work on the Louvre.

20130626-193750.jpg

The heart of the new design included not only a renovation of the Cour Napoléon in the midst of the buildings, but also a transformation of the interiors. Pei proposed a central entrance, not unlike the lobby of the National Gallery East Building, which would link the three major buildings. Below would be a complex of additional floors for research, storage, and maintenance purposes. At the center of the courtyard he designed a glass and steel pyramid, first proposed with the Kennedy Library, to serve as entrance and anteroom skylight. It was mirrored by another inverted pyramid underneath, to reflect sunlight into the room. These designs were partly an homage to the fastidious geometry of the famous French landscape architect André Le Nôtre (1613–1700). Pei also found the pyramid shape best suited for stable transparency, and considered it “most compatible with the architecture of the Louvre, especially with the faceted planes of its roofs”.

Biasini and Mitterrand liked the plans, but the scope of the renovation displeased Louvre director André Chabaud. He resigned from his post, complaining that the project was “unfeasible” and posed “architectural risks”. The public also reacted harshly to the design, mostly because of the proposed pyramid. One critic called it a “gigantic, ruinous gadget”; another charged Mitterrand with “despotism” for inflicting Paris with the “atrocity”. Pei estimated that 90 percent of Parisians opposed his design. “I received many angry glances in the streets of Paris,” he said. Some condemnations carried nationalistic overtones. One opponent wrote: “I am surprised that one would go looking for a Chinese architect in America to deal with the historic heart of the capital of France.”

20130626-193711.jpg
Pei decided that a pyramid was “most compatible” with the other structures at the Louvre, complementing their roofs’ faceted planes.

Soon, however, Pei and his team won the support of several key cultural icons, including the conductor Pierre Boulez and Claude Pompidou, widow of former French President Georges Pompidou, after whom another controversial museum was named. In an attempt to soothe public ire, Pei took a suggestion from then-mayor of Paris Jacques Chirac and placed a full-sized cable model of the pyramid in the courtyard. During the four days of its exhibition, an estimated 60,000 people visited the site. Some critics eased their opposition after witnessing the proposed scale of the pyramid.

To minimize the impact of the structure, Pei demanded a method of glass production that resulted in clear panes. The pyramid was constructed at the same time as the subterranean levels below, which caused difficulties during the building stages. As they worked, construction teams came upon an abandoned set of rooms containing 25,000 historical items; these were incorporated into the rest of the structure to add a new exhibition zone.

The new Louvre courtyard was opened to the public on October 14, 1988, and the Pyramid entrance was opened the following March. By this time, public opinion had softened on the new installation; a poll found a fifty-six percent approval rating for the pyramid, with twenty-three percent still opposed. The newspaper Le Figaro had vehemently criticized Pei’s design, but later celebrated the tenth anniversary of its magazine supplement at the pyramid. Prince Charles of Britain surveyed the new site with curiosity, and declared it “marvelous, very exciting”. A writer in Le Quotidien de Paris wrote: “The much-feared pyramid has become adorable.”. The experience was exhausting for Pei, but also rewarding. “After the Louvre,” he said later, “I thought no project would be too difficult.”. The Louvre Pyramid has become Pei’s most famous structure.

20130626-193831.jpg
We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in CT, DE, FL, NJ, NY, PA.


Green Glass at Corning Museum

DSC_0002_MV_CNMVOHKWJXFE_cvppq6a4sedq DSC_0021_MV_GWYWIWYONJMI_yhmceocyxseh DSC_0045_MV_JUSCMHDIXUZZ_ptzsnas6bw8h DSC_0048_MV_VKZDNILBCSXM_cf91jvrkljb9 DSC_0059_MV_KRLACPVHRMSA_gxoe7n0i1ecq

The New York City practice Thomas Phifer and Partners have unveiled their design for the new 100,000 square foot North Wing expansion at the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, New York. The state of the art, “energy smart” building will provide the ideal interior environment for preserving the Museum’s unparalleled collection of glass art through natural lighting, an intelligent building envelope and sophisticated temperature and air quality controls. The $64 million North Wing is scheduled for completion in 2014.

Included in the expansion will be a 26,000 square feet of gallery space. This is the largest space anywhere dedicated to the presentation of contemporary art in glass.

Environmentally Sustainable Design Elements:

  • Insulated double glazed windows with high performance, low-E coating to reduce heat gain
  • Daytime illumination provided by natural light
  • Daylight harvesting system
  • Carbon dioxide monitors control volume of outside air intake
  • Enthalpy wheel recovers heat from building exhaust
  • VAV controls track occupancy and system performance to reduce energy consumption
  • Water economizer uses cooling towers instead of chillers to produce cooling in winter for pumps
  • Multiple valves on cooling coils reduce energy required for dehumidification
  • Commissioning of building systems maximizes equipment efficiency
  • Facility personnel training improves long-term maintenance and operation
  • Design of storm water retention reduces run-off and erosion
  • Site lighting is designed to meet Dark Sky standards

Click here to read more about this exciting project!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post.  We sincerely appreciate all your comments.

If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
P.O. Box 335, Hamburg, NJ 07419
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
fax: 973.718.4641
web: http://fc3arch.com
Licensed in NJ, NY, PA, DE, CT.


Who is Vassilis & What is “The Remote Posing Project”

First of all I want to thank everyone for supporting and subscribing to my Art & Architecture (and misc.) blog.  In less than one year we have gone from 100 visitors a day to nearly 1,000 and growing everyday.  Thank you, thank you, thank you!

I have met some really interesting people utilizing various social media sites.  Vassilis, aka “Vasvas” has some of the most intense portraits I have ever seen.  The interesting part is that he does his portraits remotely.  Read on to learn about his process and how he creates these intriguing images of people all around the world, many which he has never met in person.

Vasvas, your work is incredible.  Can you tell us about your latest project and how did you get started with this project?

Thank you very much! My project is called “Remote Posing Project”. I post in instagram and Flickr hi contrast and highly detailed portraits. My portraits are extreme close ups of people’s faces in order to get the required detail. After posting some of my photos on instagram, a guy with nickname @Nixxin (Ben Boyd from Mississauga, Ontario) sent me a portrait of him to edit.

The post was very successful and I thought that as my shooting process is very simple (put your iPhone close to your nose and shoot!), I could sent some simple instructions and people from all over the world will send me their photos for editing. The Remote Posing Project (the name sucks!) was born! So far I’ve made the portraits of 19 people from USA to Australia! 

Can you explain your artistic process?  Which artists if any are you influenced by?

The summary of my process is that I convert a color photo to a HDR black and white photograph. I use only my iPhone 4 for shooting and editing my portraits. The process was discovered by chance one day I was fooling around with some applications… The result was impressive and I perfected the process. My process enhances extremely the details of the skin making some people think  I shoot with an expensive DSL camera.. But it’s just an iPhone 4 or 4s and good lighting conditions! The comment I usually receive is that although I make people look ugly I capture their soul in my photos. Some others say that I make people look like coal miners, which I think, is true! Also women avoid sending me their faces!!! In my opinion I make some very interesting detailed portraits and that is all…. I don’t have have any influences, I never thought that I will be shooting portraits…. But I’m sure there are some great photographers who made this style of photography before me….

So far beside the people participating in the project, I had the pleasure to cooperate with some great instagrammers like Evren Dede (@evrendede) from Greece with who I made my most popular photo and Serhan Keser (@serhankeser) from Turkey who donated a great face to my collection!

Self Portrait by Vassilis This is my ugly face...! I use this photo for my avatar in Instagram. The original caption is "Vassilis Segos, Marriage Counselor". I try to use humorous or intriguing captions in my photos...."

Self Portrait by Vassilis This is another photo of me, previously unreleased. I posted this in a dating site with no success at all...!

Read the rest of this entry »


FC3 HAITI – Now on LinkedIn


Please join us at our new LinkedIn Group and please spread the word about our efforts to raise money for Architecture for Humanity!

If you have any questions or suggestions regarding this effort please contact me.

Thank you!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III – Architect
PO Box 335 Hamburg NJ 07419
973.970.3551 / fc3haiti@me.com

Share/Bookmark