Recording Device (Part 2)

The Architectist Records the City.


Recording Device, NYC Pier (1996) (This project was about recording an “image” or in my case “movement” and “image.” After visiting the given site and completing a thorough analysis of how a photographic lenses and shutter work, the idea that evolved was to record the movement of the adjacent traffic. The movement (speed and weight) of the passing automobiles and other vehicles that drive over the adjacent roadway would be translated to the recording device in the Hudson River which would in turn sculpt the pier accordingly. These are slides taken by the professor of the models I built to fit into the class site model.)


Recording Device, Image #4
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Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III


Recording Device, Image #5
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Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III

Recording Device, Image #6
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Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III – Architect & Visual Artist

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Recording Device (Part 1)

The Architectist Records the City.


Recording Device, NYC Pier (1996) (This project was about recording an “image” or in my case “movement” and “image.” After visiting the given site and completing a thorough analysis of how a photographic lenses and shutter work, the idea that evolved was to record the movement of the adjacent traffic. The movement (speed and weight) of the passing automobiles and other vehicles that drive over the adjacent roadway would be translated to the recording device in the Hudson River which would in turn sculpt the pier accordingly. These are slides taken by the professor of the models I built to fit into the class site model.)

Recording Device, Image #1
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Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III


Recording Device, Image #2
Architectist-0015.jpg
Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III

Recording Device, Image #3
Architectist-0016.jpg
Copyright © 2010 Frank Cunha III

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III – Architect & Visual Artist

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What is the Thinking Hand in Architecture (and why we, as architects, must defend the natural slowness and diversity of experience) #ilmaBlog #Discourse #Theory #Architecture #Design

ILMA The Thinking Hand 01

2009 Book, The Thinking Hand written byArchitect Juhani Pallasmaa

In The Thinking Hand, Architect Juhani Pallasmaa reveals the miraculous potential of the human hand. He shows how the pencil in the hand of the artist or architect becomes the bridge between the imagining mind and the emerging image. The book surveys the multiple essences of the hand, its biological evolution and its role in the shaping of culture, highlighting how the hand–tool union and eye–hand–mind fusion are essential for dexterity and how ultimately the body and the senses play a crucial role in memory and creative work. Pallasmaa here continues the exploration begun in his classic work The Eyes of the Skin by further investigating the interplay of emotion and imagination, intelligence and making, theory and life, once again redefining the task of art and architecture through well-grounded human truths.

Pallasmaa notes that, “…architecture provides our most important existential icons by which we can understand both our culture and ourselves. Architecture is an art form of the eye, the hand, the head and the heart. The practice of architecture calls for the eye in the sense of requiring precise and perceptive observation. It requires the skills of the hand, which must be understood as an active instrument of processing ideas in the Heideggeran sense. As architecture is an art of constructing and physical making, its processes and origins are essential ingredients of its very expression…”

Linking art and architecture he continues, “…as today’s consumer, media and information culture increasingly manipulate the human mind through thematized environments, commercial conditioning and benumbing entertainment, art has the mission to defend the autonomy of individual experience and provide an existential ground for the human condition. One of the primary tasks of art is to safeguard the authenticity and independence of human experience.”

Pallasmaa asserts that,

“Confidence in future architecture must be based on the knowledge of its specific task; architects need to set themselves tasks that no one else knows how to imagine. Existential meanings of inhabiting space can be articulated by the art of architecture alone. Thus architecture continues to have a great human task in mediating between the world and ourselves and in providing a horizon of understanding in the human existential condition.

The task of architecture is to maintain the differentiation and hierarchical and qualitative articulation of existential space. Instead of participating in the process of further speeding up the experience of the world, architecture has to slow down experience, halt time, and defend the natural slowness and diversity of experience. Architecture must defend us against excessive exposure, noise and communication. Finally, the task of architecture is to maintain and defend silence. The duty of architecture and art is to survey ideals and new modes of perception and experience, and thus open up and widen the boundaries of our lived world.”

(Source: https://www.wiley.com/en-us/The+Thinking+Hand%3A+Existential+and+Embodied+Wisdom+in+Architecture-p-9780470779293)

We would love to hear from you about what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments – and – if you like this post please share it with friends.

Feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

Sincerely,

FRANK CUNHA III
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