My Number Three | 03111211371151 — Collaboration by @FC3ZMD @Zorlone @FrankCunhaIII

Photo taken by Lorenzo Bernardino – Philippines (using iPhone) | Re-Edited by Frank Cunha III in Photoshop – USA.

The original photo taken by my friend and international collaborator, Lorenzo Bernardino, inspired me to talk about the #3 and why I think it is such a fantastic number (besides the fact that it is my name).

Here is link to other projects we have worked together on and click here to see other posts about numbers.

Original Photo taken by Lorenzo Bernardino – Philippines (using iPhone).

The following is borrowed from Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia:

The #3 in Mathematics

In Numeral Systems

It is frequently noted by historians of numbers that early counting systems often relied on the three-patterned concept of “One- Two- Many” to describe counting limits. In other words, in their own language equivalent way, early peoples had a word to describe the quantities of one and two, but any quantity beyond this point was simply denoted as “Many”. As an extension to this insight, it can also be noted that early counting systems appear to have had limits at the numerals 2, 3, and 4. References to counting limits beyond these three indices do not appear to prevail as consistently in the historical record.

Evolution of the glyph

Three is often the largest number written with as many lines as the number represents. The Romans tired of writing 4 as IIII, instead using IV, but to this day 3 is written as three lines in Roman and Chinese numerals. This was the way the Brahmin Indians wrote it, and the Gupta made the three lines more curved. The Nagari started rotating the lines clockwise and ending each line with a slight downward stroke on the right. Eventually they made these strokes connect with the lines below, and evolved it to a character that looks very much like a modern 3 with an extra stroke at the bottom. It was the Western Ghubar Arabs who finally eliminated the extra stroke and created our modern 3. (The “extra” stroke, however, was very important to the Eastern Arabs, and they made it much larger, while rotating the strokes above to lie along a horizontal axis, and to this day Eastern Arabs write a 3 that looks like a mirrored 7 with ridges on its top line): ٣[2]

While the shape of the 3 character has an ascender in most modern typefaces, in typefaces with text figures the character usually has a descender, as, for example, in . In some French text-figure typefaces, though, it has an ascender instead of a descender.

A common variant of the digit 3 has a flat top, similar to the character Ʒ (ezh), sometimes used to prevent people from falsifying a 3 into an 8.

In Science

Anatomy

  • A human ear has three semicircular canals.
  • A human middle ear has three ossicles.
  • Most elbows consist of three bones, the only joint in the human body where three articulations are surrounded by one capsule.
  • Humans perceive white light as the mixture of the three additive primary hues: red, green, and blue.

Anthropology

Georges Dumézil developed the Trifunctional Hypothesis which divides prehistoric Indo-European society into three classes: priests, warriors, and commoners.

Astronomy

Biology (specific and general)

Chemistry

Physics

In Religion

Main article: Triple deity

See also: Third day in the Bible

Many world religions contain triple deities or concepts of trinity, including:

Abrahamic religions

The Shield of the Trinity is a diagram of the Christian doctrine of the Trinity

Christianity

Islam

  • During wudhu, the hands, arms, face and feet are each washed three times.
  • According to the prophet Muhammad, there are three holy cities of Islam (to which pilgrimage should be made): MeccaMedina, and Jerusalem.

Judaism

In Hinduism

In Buddhism

  • The Three Jewels (or Triple Gem) in which Buddhists “take refuge” are the Buddha, the Dharma (the Buddha’s teachings), and the Sangha (the community of enlightened beings).
  • The Triple Bodhi (ways to understand the end of birth) are Budhu, Pasebudhu, and Mahaarahath.
  • The Buddha has three bodies.[citation needed]

Other religions

In esoteric tradition

In Philosophy

Main article: Trichotomy (philosophy)

As a Lucky Number

Three (三, formal writing: 叁, pinyin san1, Cantonese: saam1) is considered a good number in Chinese culture because it sounds like the word “alive” (生 pinyin sheng1, Cantonese: saang1), compared to four (四, pinyin: si4, Cantonese: sei1), which sounds like the word “death” (死 pinyin si3,Cantonese: sei2).

Counting to three is common in situations where a group of people wish to perform an action in synchronyNow, on the count of three, everybody pull!  Assuming the counter is proceeding at a uniform rate, the first two counts are necessary to establish the rate, but then everyone can predict when three” will come based on “one” and “two”; this is likely why three is used instead of some other number.

In Vietnam, there is a superstition that considers it bad luck to take a photo with three people in it; it is professed that the person in the middle will die soon.

There is another superstition that it is unlucky to take a third light, that is, to be the third person to light a cigarette from the same match or lighter. This superstition is sometimes asserted to have originated among soldiers in the trenches of the First World War when a sniper might see the first light, take aim on the second and fire on the third.

The phrase “Third time’s the charm” refers to the superstition that after two failures in any endeavor, a third attempt is more likely to succeed. This is also sometimes seen in reverse, as in “third man [to do something, presumably forbidden] gets caught”.

Luck, especially bad luck, is often said to “come in threes”.[4]

The Rule of Three is an American superstition in which celebrity deaths tend to occur in threes.

In Technology

  • The glyph “3” may be used as a substitute for yogh (Ȝ, ȝ) or Greek xi (Ξ, ξ) or ze (З, з) when those characters are not available.
  • Three is the minimum odd number of voting components for simple easy redundancy checks by direct comparison.
  • Three is approximately pi (actually closer to 3.14159) when doing rapid engineering guesses or estimates. The same is true if one wants a rough-and-ready estimate of e, which is actually approximately 2.7183.
  • “3” is the DVD region code for many East Asian countries, except for Japan (which is Region 2) and China (which is Region 6).
  • 3 is a brand of 3G mobile phones.
  • Channel 3 is the television channel traditionally associated with ITV in the UK, and, since 1990, the broadcaster’s legal name.
  • The television VHF channel most often used in North America for hooking up VCRs and/or video game systems. If it is otherwise occupied by a local broadcaster, then channel 4 is used instead.
  • Some may use “3” as an alternate to the letter “E“, often in jest or when using Leetspeak, to denote being experienced in certain technology related fields.

In Music

In filmography

In Games

The game rock-paper-scissors involves three hand shapes. Rock, paper, and scissors.

In Literature

Artwork: Lorenzo Bernardino & Frank Cunha III

If you like this post please share it and spread the love to my collaborator by liking the post here as well.

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook

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