Architect’s Sketchbook – Cape May, NJ (Sketches by @FrankCunhaIII, August 5, 2017)

A few sketches from my brief trip to Cape May after my triathlon race.

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Architect’s Sketchbook – Portugal & Spain (Sketches by @FrankCunhaIII, July 2017)

 


How to Be a Rock Star Architect by @FrankCunhaIII

Frank Cunha III, AIA, is a licensed architect in 9 states and has been a registered architect since 2003. He has worked on a multitude of project types over the years and offers some tips to aspiring architects getting started working with clients on design projects.

1) Do Your Homework
Even before you start you should do your background research on project location, preexisting conditions. At the very least check on the site on google maps. You have the internet. No excuses!

2) Listen to the Client
Even if the client isn’t always right, they may have some great ideas on how to make the design better. Ultimately, the space you design is for their use and they should feel like part of the process. It is our jobs to guide them to make the best decisions. Base those decisions on the uniqueness of your particular client since their needs will be very specific to them.

3) Be On Time
Your punctuality reflects your attention to detail and defines who you are. If you want to be valued by the client, you in turn should be respectful of their time. Whether it is a meeting or project deadline be sure to manage the client’s expectations.

4) Always Under Promise, Always Over Deliver
Try to work with the client on mutually agreeable deliverables. Whenever possible try to give yourself a bit of breathing room and when the opportunity arises try to beat those expectations. This will built trust between you and the client.

5) Check-In With Client
Be sure to work in periodic check-in points for approvals to avoid getting to far in a design only to find out that there has been some major revisions and you spent time working on design details that will be modified or deleted. Build these milestones into your contract agreement and avoid difficult conversations about extra compensation later on.

Drink Lots of Coffee (Optional)

Please share other ideas you may have with us!

Sincerely,

Frank


@FC3ARCHITECTURE – New Project Under Construction

Dear Readers,

We are sharing a recent project we completed the design and it is currently under construction.  As you can see it is quite an expansion to a modest home.  We are happy to see it is on schedule and on budget and should be completed this summer.

IMG_0612IMG_0616IMG_0611IMG_0610IMG_0614IMG_0615IMG_0613IMG_0618IMG_0621IMG_0619IMG_0617IMG_0620IMG_0609IMG_0608We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!

FRANKCUNHAIII


A’17 Presentation Preview

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Better Than a Selfie

cels-004-selfiecels-003-have-funEveryone likes to take a selfie (these days).  Only thing better is when someone else takes a selfie some place you helped design and build.

What: Center for Environmental Life Sciences

Where: Montclair State University

Who: Architect ; Photographer ; Builder ; Project Manager

Happy New Year!

Sincerely,
Frank Cunha III
I Love My Architect – Facebook
FC3 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN, LLC
e-mail: fcunha@fc3arch.com
mobile: 201.681.3551
direct: 973.970.3551
web: Business / Personal
Licensed in CT, DC, DE, FL, MD, NJ, NY, PA, VA


DE CHIRICO

Giorgio de Chirico (July 10, 1888 – 20 November 20, 1978), an Italian artist, who in the years before World War I, founded the scuola metafisica art movement, which profoundly influenced the surrealists. After 1919, he became interested in traditional painting techniques, and worked in a neoclassical or neo-Baroque style, while frequently revisiting the metaphysical themes of his earlier work.
De Chirico is best known for the paintings he produced between 1909 and 1919, his metaphysical period, which are characterized by haunted, brooding moods evoked by their images. At the start of this period, his subjects were still cityscapes inspired by the bright daylight of Mediterranean cities, but gradually he turned his attention to studies of cluttered storerooms, sometimes inhabited by mannequin-like hybrid figures. 

 

   
    
    
    
    
 
  
 
 

In autumn, 1919, De Chirico published an article in Valori Plastici entitled “The Return of Craftsmanship”, in which he advocated a return to traditional methods and iconography. This article heralded an abrupt change in his artistic orientation, as he adopted a classicizing manner inspired by such old masters as Raphael and Signorelli, and became an outspoken opponent of modern art.In the paintings of his metaphysical period, De Chirico developed a repertoire of motifs—empty arcades, towers, elongated shadows, mannequins, and trains among others—that he arranged to create “images of forlornness and emptiness” that paradoxically also convey a feeling of “power and freedom”. According to Sanford Schwartz, De Chirico—whose father was a railroad engineer—painted images that suggest “the way you take in buildings and vistas from the perspective of a train window. His towers, walls, and plazas seem to flash by, and you are made to feel the power that comes from seeing things that way: you feel you know them more intimately than the people do who live with them day by day.”

In 1982, Robert Hughes wrote that De Chirico “could condense voluminous feeling through metaphor and association … In The Joy of Return, 1915, de Chirico’s train has once more entered the city … a bright ball of vapor hovers directly above its smokestack. Perhaps it comes from the train and is near us. Or possibly it is a cloud on the horizon, lit by the sun that never penetrates the buildings, in the last electric blue silence of dusk. It contracts the near and the far, enchanting one’s sense of space. Early de Chiricos are full of such effects. Et quid amabo nisi quod aenigma est? (“What shall I love if not the enigma?”)—this question, inscribed by the young artist on his self-portrait in 1911, is their subtext.”

In this, he resembles his more representational American contemporary, Edward Hopper: their pictures’ low sunlight, their deep and often irrational shadows, their empty walkways and portentous silences creating an enigmatic visual poetry.

For more information on Giorgio de Chirico click here.

  
    
    
 

 

We would love to hear from you on what you think about this post. We sincerely appreciate all your comments.If you like this post please share it with friends. And feel free to contact us if you would like to discuss ideas for your next project!
-FRANKCUNHAIII